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Weekend Trivia -- Sunday

Posted by midnightsmum 4b ON (My Page) on
Sun, Sep 16, 12 at 10:02

Good Sunday Morning, Cottagers!! It is cool and clear here, but should warm up a bit later!! Gorgeous fall day.

Well, we have talked about music in the past, but mostly about songs and bands and musicians. Shall we go back to the basics? I actually did take piano lessons as a child - made it to Grade 8 before boys and rock n'roll took hold!! lol. Also, Grade 8 is where you begin to learn 'Theory', which gets into the nuts and bolts of music, e.i. to a 13-year-old girl, b-o-r-i-n-g!!!! Make no mistake, the world did not lose a musical genius when I walked away from the piano, and began playing the radio!
So, today we are looking for a natural phenomenon that has been referred to as the "basic miracle of music", the use of which is "common in most musical systems". Hmmmm....it is a part of most "advanced musical cultures", but is far from universal in "primitive" and early music.

Any guesses? Is this easy? I knew what this was, but didn't understand how basic a premise it was...now I find it kind of sexy. Maybe I should go back and take Theory!!

Back later with clues~~Nancy.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Weekend Trivia -- Sunday

I have two thoughts, but neither seem particularly "sexy" unless it is a particular form of one of them used for a particular purpose.

I will be back looking for clues after I fill the bird feeders and move the hose which has been running for two days. Looking forward to possible rain on Tuesday!

Cynthia


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RE: Weekend Trivia -- Sunday

Sexy may just be in my view!! Not sure others would have the same perspective.

After unison, this is the simplest interval in music. The languages in which the oldest extant written documents on tuning are written, Sumerian and Akkadian, have no known word for "_ _ _ _ _ _". However, it is believed that a set of cuneiform tablets that collectively describe the tuning of a nine-stringed instrument, believed to be a Babylonian lyre, describe tunings for seven of the strings, with indications to tune the remaining two strings an "_ _ _ _ _ _" from two of the seven tuned strings. Or the Moody Blues 9th album!! Hmmm...again!!

Nancy.


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RE: Weekend Trivia -- Sunday

Well, no more comments yet - hmmm indeed. Well, I'm off to a baby shower, back in a couple of hours to add more clues!!

Nancy.


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RE: Weekend Trivia -- Sunday

Does it take a fairly big stretch to produce this on a piano?
Is there a connection to an early form of the periodic table of the elements? (chemistry trivia!)

TM


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RE: Weekend Trivia -- Sunday

Well, I was going in a completely different direction. I was thinking of birdsong or the music rain makes (natural occurrence threw me). I was not thinking of a term. So, going back to the storage vault that is my mind (a leaking sieve actually-that is redundant isn't it? See what I mean!), I have another idea, but only thanks to the Moody Blues reference.

Cynthia


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RE: Weekend Trivia -- Sunday

Well, TM - depending on the size of your hands, it could be a stretch!! I know when I was young it was for me. As to the elements, well.....it could be represented by a 2-letter code - P8, because it is considered perfect, rather like a Pythagorean interval!! Ha, how's that?? When several of these notes are played together, they "ring" together, adding a pleasing sound to music. The word can also be used in the Catholic liturgical sense.....whew, so many uses. And yes, Cyn, if the MB's reference got you there, good. The more I learn about their music, the deeper it becomes!!

Nancy.


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RE: Weekend Trivia -- Sunday

It was one of those things where "...Lost Chord" came to mind, but immediately was replaced by another due to the number of letters you want and your use of "an"!

Cynthia


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RE: Weekend Trivia -- Sunday

After unison, which would be a 1:1 ratio of frequencies, I think that the next simplest ratio would be 1:2, which would stretch about 6 1/2 inches on a piano keyboard. It seems appropriate that Nancy learned this in grade 8. :)

Does this make sense?

TM


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RE: Weekend Trivia -- Sunday

It makes PERFECT sense. Now, my source says the ratio is 2:1, and I'm not sure why that would make a difference from 1:2. For example, if the first were 220 Hz, the next in sequence would be 440 Hz, then 880 Hz, and so on.

Nancy.

Here is a link that might be useful: Closing tune on the album


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RE: Weekend Trivia -- Sunday

Lower to higher = 1:2
Higher to lower = 2:1

Same relationship, different points of view, right?

TM


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RE: Weekend Trivia -- Sunday

Aha, thanks!! That does make sense!! Interesting that music and science have a correlation!! The Pythagorean connection blew my mind, cause the only thing I have used his triangle for since high school has been to square the corner of a deck! Like I said, I am finding all of this very sexy, and would like to be able take it up again.

Nancy.


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RE: Weekend Trivia -- Sunday

Duh, this is all greek to me all I could think of was from 'C' to 'C' it looks like I'm out in left field again.

Annette


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RE: Weekend Trivia -- Sunday

Well, Annette from C to shining C indeed - I was looking for "octave". Not my favourite Moody Blues album, but it was the one that got them back together and recording after a 4 year hiatus!! It was also keyboardist Mike Pinder's last album, and if you watch the video at the end, it's interesting how he enters the 'light', but doesn't come out the other side.

In music, an octave or perfect octave is the interval between one musical pitch and another with half or double its frequency. The octave relationship is a natural phenomenon that has been referred to as the "basic miracle of music", the use of which is "common in most musical systems". It may be derived from the harmonic series as the interval between the first and second harmonics. notes an octave apart are given the same note name in the Western system of music notation - the name of a note an octave above A is also A. This is called octave equivalency, the assumption that pitches one or more octaves apart are musically equivalent in many ways, leading to the convention "that scales are uniquely defined by specifying the intervals within an octave". The conceptualization of pitch as having two dimensions, pitch height (absolute frequency) and pitch class (relative position within the octave), inherently include octave circularity. Thus all C♯s, or all 1s (if C = 0), in any octave are part of the same pitch class.

Monkeys experience octave equivalency, and its biological basis apparently is an octave mapping of neurons in the auditory thalamus of the mammalian brain and the perception of octave equivalency in self-organizing neural networks can form through exposure to pitched notes, without any tutoring, this being derived from the acoustical structure of those notes. Studies have also shown the perception of octave equivalence in rats (Blackwell & Schlosberg, 1943), human infants (Demany & Armand, 1984), and musicians (Allen, 1967) but not starlings (Cynx, 1993), 4-9 year old children (Sergeant, 1983), or nonmusicians (Allen, 1967).

FYI, for TM, a Pythagorean interval is a musical interval with frequency ratio equal to a power of two divided by a power of three, or vice versa. For instance, the perfect fifth with ratio 3/2 (equivalent to 31/21) and the perfect fourth with ratio 4/3 (equivalent to 22/31) are Pythagorean intervals. Am I the only one getting hot?? lol. I really do need to get back into this!!

So, for TM, Cyn and our last minute entry, Annette:
PhotobucketPhotobucketPhotobucketPhotobucket

Thanks for playing all! I've given you some pretty songs from Octave, the album. Some of the Blue Jays music was folded into the album. This one's a rocker, written and sung by John Lodge. I read a recent interview with him, about this song. He was talking about staying on a good path, and described the 'Slide Zone' putting you foot wrong in life - such an English thing to say!! Everyone please have a great week, see you next weekend.

Nancy.

Here is a link that might be useful: Steppin' in a Slide Zone


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RE: Weekend Trivia -- Sunday

LOL Nancy, I thought I had posted my answer before but must have not hit the submit button. Took 5 years of piano myself but didn't like it, I wanted to play the Sax. It's was TM's comment "stretch" that got me going in the right direction. I could just barely do it.

Annette


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RE: Weekend Trivia -- Sunday

That is funny Annette!! I really wanted to play clarinet!! I guess they thought we should all start with piano - sadly, we ended there too!

Just out of the shower and back from my garden. I have a bucket of tomatoes - lovely. Also harvested my seed CTT beans for next year. I should have been paying attention, as I pulled the rather sad looking vines, then realized there were a bunch of new flowers at the top. 8( Oh well, next year - at least I have seed.

Nancy.


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RE: Weekend Trivia -- Sunday

I have always loved The Day We Meet Again and that is a wonderful rendition. I sure do wish I knew more about music. No talent, but absolutely could not live without it.

Thanks for the undeserved stars. Good thing I am a Moody Blues fan, huh?

Cynthia


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