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Planting in Pots

Posted by annieg13 Z5MI (My Page) on
Sat, Apr 7, 07 at 18:35

I've been following the post on the sting of losses. Most of the plants that were lost seemed to have been planted in pots. Can anyone tell me why they plant in pots versus in the ground. From the major losses some of you had, I would think planting in the ground is better - what are the advantages to planting in pots?

Annie


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Planting in Pots

Hi Annie,
My advantage to planting in pots is that I can keep my new arrivals out of my established gardens for a year to avoid spreading rust throughout my gardens. As soon as I get a box of daylilies I pot them up straight away and to the back field they go way far away from my established gardens. Last year a lot of my new arrivals had rust, it was much easier to control having them all potted up and grouped together. There is no way I would have had time to fight this in my established gardens! Course winter took care of the rust and 130+ potted plants died even with mulch piled up around the pots....which was my way to make them think they were in the ground.....LOL! I have approx. 500 potted up so I guess 130 out of 500 ain't bad.....NOT!
I find the daylilies recover better for me in a pot of potting soil rather than in the ground. When I first started collecting DLs years ago, I lost more to crown rot putting them straight into the ground, with the pots I can put them in the shade if needed or protect from too much rain, etc. Now that spring has rolled around what did survive in pots will be going into the ground as soon as this cold SNAP is gone!
Nancy


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Like Nancy, I pot up all my new arrivals and they spend one year in solitary so to speak. Last year I found rust on three of my new arrivals and it was much easier to move the pots a little separate from the rest, treat, and observe. I usually am able to get all of the potted ones in the greenhouse over the winter - minus any that showed signs of rust - and all is well. I then transplant them all during early spring to new locations - I dig the whole large enough to allow for all the potted soil/roots so the plant adjusts to be moved very easily - in some cases, not even the slightest wilt of a fan. I also notice that my new arrivals bounced back better in a pot than in the ground - just my personal experience -- probably because I pampered them more.
Have I lost a few this year -- yes.. but not all were in pots - some were in the ground and were not newbies to my garden - go figure.
Shelly


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I'm on clay here, and I have found that by potting new arrivals in 3 gallon pots with a good potting soil, by the end of the summer they have filled the pot with roots. Then I dig a big oversized hole and plant the whole thing with a couple of cups of milorganite in the hole. The plants do so much better that way. I have not had a plant heave even when I plant as late as Novemeber because of the huge root mass holding it down. The down side is I had about a dozen that didn't get planted, and lost 1, ARABIAN MAGIC. I did not cover them with anything, and the year I did I lost a lot of them to mice, which we never had a problem with before then. I built them a nice warm condo, and provided enough food for the whole winter, and then some. After reading some of the accounts, I would never cover them again. Moving them to a more protected area would seem to be a better idea.

Rust is another good reason, I got it in 2005 from some new arrivals, and it just spread to the potted plants that all came from the same source, and not the whole garden. I had one plant get it last summer, and I think I brought the spores home from a local garden center while I was bargin hunting for Coneflowers and Hostas. Their Daylilys were covered with rust and they had no idea what was going on with them until I told them. It was easy to move that one plant away from everything else, than to deal with a whole garden full.

This year I only purchased 1 plant from an area where rust can over winter. I will pot that plant and it will be kept away from everything else.


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I plant the bulk of my new arrivals in pots. Primarily because I don't have the room in established beds and I use a sterile mix to pot them up with. This allows time for wounds to heal and the plant to establish a root mass before I plant it.
I do keep a few plants in pots. Mainly miniatures, so I can move them to prominent places when they are in full bloom. Along walks and by doorways. Living in pots is very hard on the plant and you have to give them constant attention. Establishing a regular watering pattern is probably the most important thing to prevent rot, IMO. Cultivate the top surface so water penetrates evenly and doesn't just run down the sides of the pot. I use Nutricote Total 18-6-8 fertilizer which provides balanced, slow released nutrition for 365 days. About one tablespoon per gallon of pot size worked into the root zone. Most potting mixes contain very little nutrients.
I try to keep all plants potted in black plastic pots out of summer sun. I have a pot migration every year. They go into the shady areas in the summer and back to full sun in the winter time.
Air circulation is a very effective tool against daylily rust. Try to space your plants such that there is about a foot of air space between adjacent plant foliage.
When you receive new plants, wash them good. Pat Stamile published a procedure on preparing new plant arrivals to minimize the spread of daylily rust, and I've found it very effective. Essentially, pull the outer two leaves off on each side of each fan. Break them off down in the white area. Then cut all remaining foliage off about an inch above the crown.
Isolating new arrivals is a very good idea. Even keeping them 20 feet away from other plants is very effective against spreading rust.
There are several polls or trials to evaluate cultivars and their susceptibility to rust. The University of Arkansas, U. of Georgia and Rebecca Board's Poll, which is available through the AHS website. Some plants are pretty rusty but still are used as parents for new introductions. Or their converted versions are used.
Buying these plants means additional effort to control rust. My advice would be to choose another plant with better rust resistance with similar features.


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RE: Planting in Pots

I kept a lot in pots because:

1. I wanted to hybridize with them in the shade, so I put the pots under my carport and beneath trees. I get a greater number of seed pods when plants are shaded in the afternoon.

2. There was feral dog who thought my yard was his territory. He started digging plants up in the new raised bed I made. So I really didn't want to put expensive plants there until the dog problem was solved. It took us four months to catch him in a humane trap.

3. I bought more than I had room to plant last spring, so they stayed in pots. I made one new bed in the fall, and planted 18 there. But I ran out of time to complete two other beds and plant. So I still have about 40 in pots.

By the way, in Michigan you should not try to overwinter pots of daylilies. It's way too cold there. Plant yours in the ground. It's only fanatics who try to hybridize, buy more than their beds can hold, and southern growers who have rust worries who plant in pots. It's not standard procedure.

Shive


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Many Northern growers, of many types of plants, leave them in pots, all Winter. Not just Daylilies but most perennials are grown and over wintered this way at most Garden Centers and Nurseries. I don't know why so many of you say not to.... and that you can't grow Daylilies in pots up here. It works fine with a minimal amout of care. Even as the group (Photos) I showed you earlier (Left by Mistake) with no protection, they did fine. There are many things I think one could do to make it even easier if they choose too. I for one, don't leave them in any Terra Cotta type pots, due to drying out and changes in root/soil temps, more then any other reasons. A few I have done on purpose that did real well, were in 7-10 gallon pots. They multipied fast and got no other special attention. I think if you do a few things like place where they are not exposed to heavy winds or in areas of extreme temp fluctuation, they will do just fine....Up here in the North.. IMHO...:) I mulch the small pots with finely chopped leaf mulch, have no critter problems of excess moisture problems...at all.
Rick


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RE: Planting in Pots

Rick,
If I remember your photo, those pots were next to a brick wall, and maybe sitting on bricks or concrete too. Bricks retain heat, and I think that's why your pots did well.

I would recommend that anyone - be it in the Great White North or where I live in Tennessee - would be better off planting in the ground. I am gambling with my plants when I leave them in pots over the winter. After four years of overwintering some in pots, I've learned where they tend to fare the best. Some perennials and some daylilies are hardier than others and can overwinter in pots without much of a problem. But if someone can put them in the ground, they should. That's my position, and I'm sticking to it.

Shive


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Many of mine are in pots because I have only a limited amount of space left in the beds for daylilies. Much of the remaining space is shady to very shady. (I've reserved some prime garden real estate -- sunny, excellent, wonderfully well-draining soil) for any intros, the best ones, sevs, anything I think is the least bit tender, etc.) The problem's been that we've been planning to move, but, in the interim, the neighbor's shade trees have matured fully: the upside, I'm now into hostas. The downside: since I do not want to stop collecting daylilies, much of my collection has to live in pots, which I've placed along the side of the house that has a south and western exposure.

I fully agree: they'd do better in the long run in the ground. But it's either no daylilies, or daylilies in pots for me.


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RE: Planting in Pots.... Pots are Fine

Shive,
Please don't missunderstand me.....of course they would be better off, in the ground. All I am trying to say is that millions of plants are grown and wintered over in the North...in pots...without dying...Just because they are in Pots does not mean they can't live and be fine. Be them Daylilies or any of hundreds of Perennials/Shrubs/trees that are grown in pots. I agree, those had a stack of bricks next to them and concrete slabs beneath...in those pic's...and that may or may not have helped....I have also grown hundreds of pots sitting on top of 2b crushed stone with typar spread out on top too. There are just MANY ways to still have fine plants, without having to plant them in the ground, all the time.....I hope you understand now, what I meant. I also would add that if your soil/dirt were like it is in many areas...it would be far better to plant in pots then in ground like that, ground that has not been amended. I just do not and will not agree with anyone saying it can't be done or is not possible to do. IMHO and that is just the way it is....Up here in the North.

Rick


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Commercial nurseries don't winter container plants unprotected. They use special insulating blankets, hoophouses, mulches and still expect a percentage of losses. They are also looking at the over-all picture and aren't going to freak out at the loss of a few expensive new daylilies from Florida because they would, or should, be sticking with plants already known to be hardy in their location.

Wintering daylilies in pots that originate in your own garden versus new daylilies shipped from the south of unknown hardiness isn't the same thing; there's a big difference between winters in zones 4 and 5 compared to zone 6b which is bordering on tropical compared to somewhere like Michigan or Minnesota; standing the pots in the sun uncovered versus in the shade could make a difference because there'd be more freezing and thawing in the sun; the temperature around the roots in an uncovered pot is going to be lower than the ground temperature.

When plants are being wintered in unprotected pots they need to be hardy to several zones colder than the one they're winterng in.


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I garden in pots because of many reasons. I thought I was going to move for awhile so I starting saving my new arrivals in pots. First off all my garden space has irises. But then I learned that with our normally mild winters here, they did fine in the big pots that I use for most. They are about 16" across. Second reason I learned is that they don't get many weeds in pots and weeding is made much easier for me at my age. Some days bending over and weeding makes me dizzy, especially in the intense heat here. I make sure they get adequate water and food. Watering in summer here is brutal. You forget for a day and they are a goner. The big pots don't need watering as often I have found. So those are my reasons, it works for me.

Dot in Texas


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Excellent points, Daniel!


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For some of us, the reduced weeding requirement is a big selling point! Moving those 15 gallon pots around is lots of work though. :0)
Ed


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Bambi- I'm interested in your exp with "Zone 5 Rust."
I thought we in the northern zones didn't have to worry about it?
Did it kill your DLs, or just infect throughout the summer months and then go away with the harsher winters we have? Will you still have to worry about it anymore, or just with that one southern plant you just purchased?


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Thanks everyone for your response. I had thought about potting up some daylilies so I could move them around (I live in the woods so don't get all day sun) but now think I'll just stick with planting them in the ground. They do bloom and multiply for me just not as well/fast as if they have all day sun. Besides pots sound like just too much work for this old lady!!!.

Annie


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Annie I live in Minnesota zone 4 where believe it or not we do not have reliable snow cover in winter often times no snow for long streches of time. The temperatures get well below freezing and I personally don't know of anyone here that keeps daylilies over winter in pots unless they have a greenhouse where they keep them. Even with planting in the ground I put some extra mulch on mine over the winter to help the plants survive the freeze/thaw cycles common in my area. I want to protect my investment with a little extra help. The winter of 06 didn't get mulch put down because of a broken arm and we had more losses than ever before so it seems to me it helps at least somewhat.
Lol I am an old lady also and love my gardening great exercise. If you want to experiment with a cheap daylily it might be worth it to see if it would work for you.


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A few years ago I decided it would be a great thing to plant in pots until I got the ground worked at the farm. I bought a bunch of plants and potted them up. They looked grand until around January and the temps took a dive to below zero with wind chills in the minus numbers. By March I knew I was in deep doo. The only plants that came out of the mess were hard dormants. I guess I lost around 60 plants that year, most of them, not new intros but a year or two old. Certainly not five dollar models!

Asking around after that fiasco I found out that you can usually bet that a pot unprotected in winter will get about 1-2 zones colder than the region you're actually in. It makes sense since they are out of the ground. I found that people mulched and strawed and did whatever else necessary to insulate their plants.

I'm not saying it can't be done. I'm just saying that if I can help it I'm not going to hold another pot over the winter unless it's a plant I'm not going to cry over if I loose it.

Janet


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Sorry Daniel, Totally disagree....two of the largest Wholesale Commercial Nursiers in the east (Conrad Pyle/Dillers) have many plants/tees/shrubs that are not in Hoop houses, cold storage or given any more protection then mulched in pots. I don't see where you can make that statement that No Commercial growers use pots...sorry wrong answer....Many do. Having worked at one and seeing it for myself. I beg to differ with you. Again, I say if given the choice for the dollar...the ground is the answer. but when dealing with the Volume and dollar ...many grow and store in pots. I know what I see and have dealt with. When you say "Unprotected" is not what I have said. Mulching in pots or healing in shrubbery or trees is a form of "Protecting".....in POTS...plain and simple.

Rick


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In 2005, it was the end of August, when I had it the first time, I was really stressed out over having to close down my business, and some other problems. The day I noticed it I was watering the potted plants. I stood there laughing like an idiot because,I had just been wondering what could go wrong next. I did nothing. I didn't cut them down, I didn't spray, I just let it run its course. I was at a point where I really couldn't have done much anyway. I don't think I lost a single plant to rust, or winter. I was forunate that it didn't spread around the entire garden. I did notice that while some plants were covered with it, some had a few spots , and some had NONE at all. I wish I would have been in a position to make notes. I think cutting them down, is nt the best thing for them because while you are removing the the affected foliage, you are removing the ability for the plant to make food for its self.

YUMA was the only plant that got it, I am nearly 100% positive I brought home the spores fron the garden center I visited that was very infected. Yuma was potted and next to my potting bench. When I brought home some Hostas and Coneflowers I put them on the potting bench. NO other plants got it, and Yuma was moved as soon as I noticed it to a spot behind the garage by its self. I did not cut it, or spray it either, and it looked to be fine before we got the foot of snow over the past week.

Its really no big deal here if you get it, it doesn't tend to show up until late August or early September. I am positive that our winter killed it.


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RE: Planting in Pots

Rick I think you are misunderstanding me a little. I didn't say "No commercial growers use pots", and I didn't say they all use hoop houses, but I did say some use mulch. I didn't intend to imply that the majority used all of the wintering method examples I listed combined.

If you want percentages see my link from Penn State comparing Western PA to nationwide methods of winter protection, survival and losses for container grown perennials. Note too that at least one of the commercial growers surveyed listed Hemerocallis as one of the perennials most difficult to overwinter in containers.

The wholesalers you mention are, like you, in zone 6/7 which is a far cry from zone 5 or less, and you said they mulch which is something I included in my list of protection methods. I didn't say anywhere that wintering in pots couldn't be done.

The point I was trying to make is that variables in our winters, the origin of the plants being wintered and several other factors influence the success of winterng perennials in pots. Even though it can be done people need to understand that there are risks involved so that they can make educated choices. I believe we are agreed on that.

It doesn't make sense to spend a lot of money on expensive new, hardiness untested, southern introductions and then try to get them through a zone 5 winter in a pot even if someone in zone 6b can do so successfully with plants that are already known to be hardy, perhaps to several zones colder.

If someone is going to winter perennials in pots the plants must at least be hardy to a few zones colder or be protected in some way because it's colder in an unprotected pot than in the ground. The size of the pot also makes a difference because a very large pot won't be as vulnerable to changes in temperature as a small one and also there are less likely to be circling roots on the outside of the pot where they'd get the most cold.

Here is a link that might be useful: Over-wintering herbaceous perennials - Penn State


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RE: Planting in Pots

Daniel and anyone else interested...LOL
I have read that, before, and many other studies and articles on the subject. I still find that "seeing and doing" with the actual plants, what they can and can't take (Conditions/Zones)...means alot more to me. I think that "This is the only or best way" things can or can't be done with plants is way over rated. I think trying things for ones self and seeing what will and won't work (With Common Sense) is the best method to find out. I also think that the Zone thing is way over rated. I find that it is much easier and less stressful on many types of plants, to be grown in zones like yours, then zones like 6. My reasons for that are ..example...The snow cover and more constant temps are much more forgiving and less stressful on plants...then the extreme "Up and Downs" of temps and other conditions...wind / water/ ice/ freeze/thaw. I think these "Tests" of a plants ability to cope are much harder on the plant then just the idea that a zone is colder in temps ...is harder or makes it impossible to grow something...IE Daylilies. I would find the examples that Peat/Petit do...the example of what I am saying....they grow them both in the Deep South and the Far North....Many do well in BOTH areas...Hardy in Both..so I guess what I am trying to say is the "Blanket" statements that so many make..that one can't grow this here or that there is Guide....but nothing more...it's a challenge to me..I like to push the edge and have found it can be done ...alot. Pot's are just a small example and folks should not Fear...trying them or many other things when gardening...that the "Rules" say you can't. IE My Southern Magnolia, my Crepe Myrtle, my "Non-Hardy" Azaleas...all that are not Supposed to grow here...well they do and they do so, very well....yes some need a few tricks but are worth it, and easy to do. Many things need no more then just a wind block, a certain planting exposure, a piece of burlap in some cases...my point being...Don't just read the "Rules" and think that all else Fails...it does NOT. Don't make all other cease to try and grow things in their areas, just because an article/ study or some "Expert" says it can't be done. My many Kinnebrews that so many told me won't grow in my area....grow very well. Even in the Stress of more extremes, then JUST Zone Cold....to many elements involved to not try and grow what you may want too....push the limits (Applied) and find out for yourself....make gardening what should be...Fun and Special....trial and error.....results that not all can achieve.....IMHO....Thats about all I got to say......about that.
Daniel, I am not trying to Argue with you, I just am trying to say that one does not need to just accept these articles or what you are saying as the "ONLY" way to grow. I hope you understand what I am trying to say...I am not one to articulate my points as well as you and others do....but I am one that would like to see more Open views and less "Expert Opinon" being used as Gospel...in the Daylily or plants world....IMHO.....
Rick
(Not responsible for Typing/Spelling /Grammer....just hard to understand...content...LOL

PS....When any of you get a chance go up to Zone 3/4 (Elevation) included up near Pittsburg N. H. (A few miles North) (Along Route 3) I planted alot of Daylilies up there...the books said they wouldn't grow or even survive....well they look great around the Cabin....in unprotected conditions...and they are Dormants/ Semi-Evergreens and Evergreens...Spacecoasts can do very well in the far north....buried under snow...and protected....yet Hmmmmm those articles say they won't...LOL each to their own...I guess...:)
Last point and I'll bet off the bandwagon.....when I was a kid..I was "Told" that I couldn't transplant a Wild Dogwood from the woods and put it in my parents yard...and have it grow or even survive. I didn't listen then...I went and did it. It still to this day is growing and is Beautiful...I also grafted a nice branch of a Pink Dogwood onto the White...by trial and error. Everyone said that won't work, it will die. Well here it is 35 years later and that tree is beautiful a gorgeous mix of both pink and white, wild and commercially grown....Together...and doing well.....many neighbors have planted and lost many non-native ones from the Garden Centers and Nursery Centers....only to lose them later...But that old Wild one everyone said would not transpnat and live...well it's just doing fine.....
Folks this is supposed to be fun and enjoyed, push the envelope and try growing what you want, where you want and how you want....turn the "Rules" into "Guidelines" and have FUN! Pots or Not...LOL


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RE: Planting in Pots

I agree with much of what you say Rick and I'm not certain why what I said before was interpreted as some kind of dogma.

I am surprised that you've seen books saying daylilies won't grow in zones 3 and 4 because that's certainly untrue. I've seen many in such areas (not in pots though :-) I don't think I would classify Peat's location as "far north"! He isn't anywhere near as cold as zones 3 or 4 as far as I know.


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I have read all the posts with interest, and thought I would add the things I have observed over this past late winter/early spring.

Late last summer/early fall I bought more DLs (approx. 100) when I promised myself I would not buy at that time again because of heaving in the garden. I planted the late arrivals in 1 - 2 gal. black nursery pots, and sat most of them at the back of the house (facing east). My husband covered them with leaves, and I saw covered literally because I didn't see how deep the cover was until I uncovered them several weeks ago. It was to thick with leaves, but believe it or not I think I only might have lost Small Gesture. For some reason that DL will not grow for me in the ground or in a pot. There were also pots placed at the south end of the house with only leaves that the wind placed there and they seem fine also. Unless I go take a look I cannot tell you if they are dormants, semis, or evergreens. I did set some out two weeks ago that I kept in a wire kennel with a concrete floor layered with cardboard and they seemed to be sending up fans. They probably were not watered as much as they should have been, and we had some real cold temps since moving them so I am anxious to see how they fair. I guess what I am trying to convey is that DLs do seem very forgiving. I, too, believe that in the ground is the best for them, but like Rick and others, I agree that pots seem to do just fine here. This is my fourth year raising many DLs (probably 800 with this springs arrivals), and after reading posts here and reading books on the subject, I seem to be 'muddling' through okay, much to my surprise.

Thanks. Jane

PS: Rick, if you read this, is that landscape place where you get your pots near central PA, and do you think they would have extra that you will not need? I have checked at the garden centers/landscapers in my area and either no pots are available, or they have used ones for $1.00 each. I can send for new ones a little cheaper, inc. shipping. Thanks


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Hi Jane,
I'm glad you had so much success with your Daylilies in pots. I will check around with the landscapers I get the pots from this Spring. They usually have plenty once the Season starts and they start their jobs. I will keep a note here and contact you when I get hold of another large batch. I have enough to get me through Spring, but I also will be grabbing a few hundred for next season, this Summer. I usually grab 1, 2 and 3 gallon pots. I keep a couple of real large ones around for mass planting, but don't grab them real often. Just let me know what sizes you want and how many. I will do my best to get them for you. They will be "Dirty"....LOL nothing a bleach bath solution won't fix.... Yes, South Central Pa between Harrisburg and York. Again, Glad you did so well with your pots...even in the stress and extreme changes in temps and conditions it just goes to show ya, it can be done. Just a little common sense as you showed, East/South exposure out of winds and some leaf mulch...success...good for you!

Rick


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RE: Planting in Pots

Max- you guys got a cell tower up there yet? LOL!


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RE: Planting in Pots.....Cell Tower Service

MMqchdygg......
There are a few around...actually can even get internet service in a few locations...LOL I do know that if you hike to the top of Magalloway Mountain and climb the Fire Tower, my cell phone actually works very well..LOL just a heck of a hike...but hey the Moose are AWESOME! Don't seem to have either located the Daylilies yet, or have not developed tastes buds for them.....yet...LOL

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Rick


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RE: Planting in Pots

I believe a moose truly has a face only a mother could adore! Surely it's a cross between a cow and a horse???? What a great shot!

Janet


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Thanks Rick. I am looking for the 3 gal size. I figure that will give some room for growth.

Great photo of the cutest moose I have ever seen, and I can say that with all honesty since I have only seen a few up close. One knocked on our cabin door when we were staying in Yellowstone. I guess bumped would be a better word. We went to see who was there and a moose was turning away from the porch. Our daughter loved it. That was a good many years ago, and it is now time to take the grandchildren.

Jane


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I'll fill you all in on a Moose fact, if there is one in the middle of the road DO NOT honk your horn at it, just sit and wait. I saw one trash a car in Canada once.


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WOW great moose shot!!!

Dot


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Thanks Janet and Dot and Jane.....they are an amazing animal...I can sit in a blind in the woods and watch them for hours....They are all over the Northern Pittsburg area of NH...Also saw many in Vermont and Maine (Moosehead Lake area). I try and get decent pic's of them...hopefully this year with the new camera, they should be much better pic's....Hope so...anyway.
Jane I will get some 3 Gallons for you and holler when I have a bunch...:) I wouldn't answer that door when the Moose come a knockin...LOL. There Ears will always tell you there tempermant and warn you of there next move....:)

Rick

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I really had to go back and reread this post, since I'm running out of in-ground space for my daylilies, but I don't want to get rid of all the other plants I love already in the garden. I just got a sturdy 7-gallon black nursery pot from a tree planted at my church, and I planted two daylilies and a mini hosta in it as an experiment. I want to see if I CAN be successful with daylilies in containers. Rereading this post was very informative. I think I've gleaned some things to help me in my zone 5 garden:

- USE LARGER POTS, not the 1-2 gallon sizes
- DON'T PUT NEW PLANTS IN THEM, use ones already proven hardy in my garden for at least a year
- WHEN IN DOUBT, MOVE THEM TO A SHELTERED LOCATION (I have a nice south-facing stone patio where I put my winter sowing containers, but I'm sure I could squeeze some large pots in there too)
- DON'T ASSUME IT CANNOT BE DONE; obviously many people DO keep all sorts of plants in containers over the winter in colder zones; but DON'T RISK AN EXPENSIVE PLANT either

Thanks for the encouragement to try something new.

Laurel


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Just had to respond to this post. I purchased a number of daylilies from a daylily grower in the toronto area who grows a substantial number of his inventory in pots. He lives in the city and does not have the space to plant everything into the ground. His method of winterizing his pots is to wait until everything freezes solid, then he moves all his pots into an unheated garage. He stacks the pots one on top of the other. According to this grower his plants have no problem over wintering. Well I am about to try the same thing this winter. Will let you know what happens next spring. I know that potentillas and asiatic lilies left outside will over winter in pots from personal experience.

Mike.


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RE: Planting in Pots

Interesting thread, thought I'd bring it forward. I overwinter potted day lilies in the northwest, up at 1500 ft. I line them up against the southwest side of the house (cement-based siding) and put them up on feet to make sure they get plenty of drainage - we get winter rain and snow here. They seem to love it, and most have already come up by mid February.


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