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Daylily Rust survey

Posted by maryl Z7 Okla. (My Page) on
Mon, Oct 22, 12 at 16:10

A friend of mine and I are doing a little research on rust this year. Hoping that you may be able to contribute your experience by answering a few questions: The answers need not be simply yes or no, but please limit your explanations somewhat:

A. Did you experience rust this year in your garden?
B. Have you ever had rust before in your garden?
C. Do you spray for rust on a regular basis?
D. Did you bring in any new daylily plants this year?
E. How would you rate your overall rust experience this year:

1=No rust at all
2=Less then 10% of the daylilies infected
3=Under 50% of daylilies infected
4=Most daylilies affected somewhat
5=Serious rust issues on most daylilies this year.

Hope you all can help us out.....Maryl


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Daylily Rust survey

A. No rust at all
B. No rust at all
C. No
D. Yes
E. Didn't have it so no experience with it.

:-).

Julia


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RE: Daylily Rust survey

A = Yes
B = Yes, every year since around 2001
C = Yes, from Feb-March to June-July. Sometimes in Oct-Nov.
D = Yes
E = Not a bad year for rust, no prolonged periods of excessive wetness.
Good luck, Ed


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RE: Daylily Rust survey

A. Did you experience rust this year in your garden?
Yes.

B. Have you ever had rust before in your garden?
Yes. I started buying daylilies in 2010, and have had rust off and on since Spring 2011.

C. Do you spray for rust on a regular basis?
Sometimes, and only in some parts. I've been trying to allow rust as much as I can tolerate so I can use it as a selection factor.

D. Did you bring in any new daylily plants this year?
Yes.

E. How would you rate your overall rust experience this year:
4=Most daylilies affected somewhat

Nate


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RE: Daylily Rust survey

  • Posted by ruthz 8a dfw texas (My Page) on
    Mon, Oct 22, 12 at 22:44

A. Did you experience rust this year in your garden?
Yes, but only saw it on 1 plant


B. Have you ever had rust before in your garden?
No, just started buying daylilies in 2011. Before that I only had 3 NOID's and Ming toy

C. Do you spray for rust on a regular basis?
Never have sprayed

D. Did you bring in any new daylily plants this year?
yes

E. How would you rate your overall rust experience this year:
any rust is bad, but I only saw it on 1 plant so that's good


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RE: Daylily Rust survey

No, Have never had rust in anything.

jean


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RE: Daylily Rust survey

A. No rust at all
B. Yes, but only because I received a couple in trade once that already had rust that spring. They looked bad that year, but the rust didn't overwinter & were fine the next year
C. No
D. Yes
E. No rust at all


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RE: Daylily Rust survey

A. Yes
B. No
C. No
D. Yes, but that wasn't where the rust was
E. 2


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RE: Daylily Rust survey

A. Did you experience rust this year in your garden?
Yes.
B. Have you ever had rust before in your garden?
Yes.
C. Do you spray for rust on a regular basis?
No.
D. Did you bring in any new daylily plants this year?
Yes.
E. How would you rate your overall rust experience this year:
not noticeable to a casual observer, but still a 4
Kathy


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RE: Daylily Rust survey

A: Yes

B: Possibly, but not aware until this year

C: Have never sprayed but will next week

D: Yes

E: 5


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RE: Daylily Rust survey

  • Posted by maryl Z7 Okla. (My Page) on
    Tue, Oct 23, 12 at 15:28

Very interesting so far. I may have some additional questions for those who have posted later on. We certainly appreciate the input and hope it continues.....Maryl


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RE: Daylily Rust survey

One thing that would be intereseting to see asked, if possible, is if the plants folks are buying/receiving have been treated with any chemicals by the shipper. OR if the buyer/receiver has treated the plants before planting in their garden.
I use the term buyer/receiver because many folks are trading or getting freebies from friends versus just buying.
Just a thought.

Julia


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RE: Daylily Rust survey

  • Posted by ruthz 8a dfw texas (My Page) on
    Wed, Oct 24, 12 at 0:10

Julia, how would we know that information? Does the companies list it on their website? I've only placed a few orders, but didn't notice anything about chemical treatments.


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RE: Daylily Rust survey

ruthz: Ask them if it is not listed on their website, ad, etc.

Julia


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RE: Daylily Rust survey

No, I've never had rust before. But I'm relatively new to daylilies. Only had 24 as of early this year. I'm over 200 now, and bought &/or traded from over a dozen different sources.

Hope I never see rust in person. The stories can scare your socks off.

Rena'


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RE: Daylily Rust survey

Rena, since we are in the same zone, just let me sound a note of warning--we never had rust until possibly last year, when my husband said he thought he saw it then--I didn't, so I missed it, but I sure didn't miss it this year. Since our winter was mild, I can only guess that there were spores that overwintered and then came out in full force this growing season. Without a doubt, the rust came from some passalong plant, because all the daylilies I ordered were unaffected until the rust was taking over everything that was suspectible--these had been planted at least a year of more and that's most of our DLs. I just dug out over 50 DLs that are passalongs or proliferations, and I probably should have taken out fifty more, but I wimped out when it came to some of the seedlings that I raised. Next week I am cutting down all the foliage on the rest of the DLs and my husband will spray with Daconil. We will wait a couple of weeks and then re-spray. By then we should be getting close to our first frost/freeze date. You can imagine we are hoping for a COLD WINTER that could kill any spores, but if not, in spring, we will be spraying again and also using a systemic spray, alternating with Daconil. I will not accept any more plants from unknown sources, and I will question every source I do purchase plants from as to whether or not they have had rust, and if so, how do they deal with it. One thing I noticed here is that the tetraploids seem to be the first affected. Some of the diploids have it, but there are several of the older dips that look to be clean. Regardless, they are all going to be sprayed. Avedon


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RE: Daylily Rust survey

A. Did you experience rust this year in your garden?

No

B. Have you ever had rust before in your garden?

Yes, one year only, over six years ago. Technically, I've never had rust in this garden, as we moved after that one time.

C. Do you spray for rust on a regular basis?

No


D. Did you bring in any new daylily plants this year?

Yes

E. How would you rate your overall rust experience this year

1 = no rust at all


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RE: Daylily Rust survey

Well, y'all have heard me groaning about rust already this year.

Here are my answers:

1 Yes
2 Yes, but was able to zap it with Nickel Plus in the past
3 No, but am doing it now! We did spray regularly this
spring, but gave up as it seemed to do no good.
4 Yes, but I don't blame vendors - it's the climate!
5 Worst I've ever seen it. We are spraying with Cabrio +
Nickel Plus, and alternating with Heritage.

So far, I see little improvement. Also battling crown rot, the real killer.

I didn't have any problem with rust at our new location until after the landscapers brought in hundreds of Stellas and planted them at the entrance. But...the Stellas look good. (?)

We won't be cutting them back until the weather looks like it is going to get cold and stay cold. After that, we'll add 2% fish oil emulsion to Heritage.

Here's an interesting study for those of you who have to deal with the problem - it's about the effectiveness of fungicides on daylily rust:

http://www.chaseagriculturalconsultingllc.com/resources/pdfs/articlesPdf/51UpdateonRustDiseasesandTheirControl .pdf


Nancy


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RE: Daylily Rust survey

Well, y'all have heard me groaning about rust already this year.

Here are my answers:

1 Yes
2 Yes, but was able to zap it with Nickel Plus in the past
3 No, but am doing it now! We did spray regularly this
spring, but gave up as it seemed to do no good.
4 Yes, but I don't blame vendors - it's the climate!
5 Worst I've ever seen it. We are spraying with Cabrio +
Nickel Plus, and alternating with Heritage.

So far, I see little improvement. Also battling crown rot, the real killer.

I didn't have any problem with rust at our new location until after the landscapers brought in hundreds of Stellas and planted them at the entrance. But...the Stellas look good. (?)

We won't be cutting them back until the weather looks like it is going to get cold and stay cold. After that, we'll add 2% fish oil emulsion to Heritage.

Here's an interesting study for those of you who have to deal with the problem - it's about the effectiveness of fungicides on daylily rust:

http://www.chaseagriculturalconsultingllc.com/resources/pdfs/articlesPdf/51UpdateonRustDiseasesandTheirControl .pdf


Nancy


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RE: Daylily Rust survey

  • Posted by maryl Z7 Okla. (My Page) on
    Fri, Oct 26, 12 at 16:39

Again, thank you for participating. The survey will be open until Sunday for those who use the week-end to catch up on the forums.
Kay: You said that you had rust but not from the plants you bought/got this year. What do you attribute the source of the infection to if not the new plants? Existing plants? Other neighbors garden daylilies? Curious...Maryl


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RE: Daylily Rust survey

Maryl, it started on a plant I had had for three years. There are no other daylilies in an area of at least a couple city blocks.

I attribute it's appearing simply to living in an area where the climate is perfect for it, and my luck running out. No idea what brought it to my yard. I originally flipped out and was very depressed.

Since I do live where I do, and I do not intend to quit growing daylilies, I will have to manage it as best I can, and accept that my garden is no longer rust free.

It seems likely that once it has reared it's ugly head, aggressive intervention may keep it in bounds, although it would take an abnormally cold winter to totally irradicate it now. I followed advice from Bill Maryott and cut infected plants as closem to the ground as possible, then sprayed them and the all of the daylilies. It worked very well.

kay


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RE: Daylily Rust survey

I just finished reading an article on rust by Mark Carpenter. He is the Region 6 rust liaison, and I think most people would find his report very good reading. He has certainly given us things to think about as we try to determine the best way to handle this rust situation in our garden. I had planned to cut back the DLs this coming week and then my husband would spray with Daconil to set us up for next year, but we may actually have a frost so now we don't know just what to do. We may decide to simply ride it out for now and wait until next growing season to start an eradication program. The Carpenter report can be accessed at www.lilyfarm.com/rust.html Avedon


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RE: Daylily Rust survey

A. No
B. Yes in 2005, 2006, and 2007
C. I did in 2007
D. Yes
E. NONE

After 2007 I altered my buying habits. I do not bring anything in from the South in the Spring, and I ask any of the Northern people I buy from to send my plants before they begin receiving new plants from the South. Since I have adopted this policy I have not had rust reappear here. By receiving plants from the South in the fall winter will kill it off, of course the sellers should not be sending plants showing signs of rust.

In 2007 I sprayed with Daconil and thought it was a waste of time since when I stopped spraying the rust came back. I may have been controling it but it would not go away.

I did see it at a Garden Center 2 years ago and told them about it, they told me that there was nothing wrong with the plants and they didn't need to be sprayed. I called the USDA which made them move them off the property and treat them. The next time I went there I was asked bluntly if I had called and answered them honestly, I was asked to leave. I had no problem with that if they didn't care that they were selling contaminated plants. They closed last fall for good. They were grossly over priced on everything anyway.


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RE: Daylily Rust survey

  • Posted by maryl Z7 Okla. (My Page) on
    Sat, Oct 27, 12 at 16:21

Bambi: Good for you reporting the nursery. There's a deadly contagious virus of roses out there called RRD (Rose Rosette Disease), and I too got the run around from the owner when I spotted it at his nursery years ago. Never thought to call a government official. Score one for you.....Kay: You can't have a disease outbreak even if conditions are ripe without an active source of infection. Do you have any of the wildflower Patrina around per chance? I find your experience noteworthy however, and it may decide the fate of a few fairly rusty daylilies that I thought about keeping over winter (for the cold to kill the rust). May not take the chance now.....Avedon: The first daylily that broke out into rust at my previously rust free garden was the new bonus plant (Jealous Dancer) sent from Mark Carpenter's The Lily Farm. It was covered in pustules (much to my surprise as I'd never seen daylily rust before) 10 days after I received it. That would be just about the time that the anti-fugal spray they use would have been wearing off. From speaking with him about rust before I placed my order and from my experience now, I'd say he certainly knows about the disease.....Again, everyones experience is welcome even those who have never had rust. Please take the survey if you haven't already......Maryl


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RE: Daylily Rust survey

Well, I kind of hate to post this, but since so many of our passalong plants came from The Lily Farm, I am sure the outbreak came from those plants which are mostly planted in one area and that's when I first saw the rust. I also did a number of my crosses with the Carpenter freebies and the one I bought--"Mom's Seedling"---and all of those are infected. In fact, this stuff just took over almost everything rapidly, a real shock and eye opener for us. Since we will probably have a freeze tonight, and maybe tomorrow night, too, we are going to wait until next year before we start doing major cutting down and spraying. I am thinking from now on I will buy only from Northern growers who have their plants outside and have gone through a winter that should kill rust. To my knowledge, we do not grow any of the other plants that host the disease. Avedon


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RE: Daylily Rust survey

As far as I can tell, patrinia is not a plant that anyone grows intentionally in the US, nor does it grow wild.

Nate


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RE: Daylily Rust survey

Southern Oregon, no rust here.
A-1
B-1


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RE: Daylily Rust survey

  • Posted by maryl Z7 Okla. (My Page) on
    Mon, Oct 29, 12 at 15:03

Including myself we had 14 reports for this survey which I will pass on to the powers that be.

(A)Of the 14 reports, 8 had rust and 6 did not this year.
(B)There was not sufficient data in this report alone to suggest that more rust free gardens became infected this year then in previous years.
(C)Most people do not spray on a regular basis.
(D)All 14 reporters(myself included),brought in new plants to their garden.
(E)Of the 8 who reported rust half had over 50% of their plants affected.

Again, thank you to those who took the time to participate....Maryl

P.S. Nate, if only it weren't so about Patrina. At one time it was being touted as a low care perennial for garden use. A wonderful mail order nursery (no longer in business now) was touting it in its 1995 catalog (which I still have). I actually considered buying it, but thank the Lord I didn't. This nursery was not alone in singing it's praises and for several years it sprang up in the more "cutting edge" nurseries as a NEW perennial (brought over by the National Arboretum from Korea). The cut flower industry was also using it at that time. Anytime a new plant is called "low care" it sends my antenna up, the same with "pass along" plants. It may mean that these plants are invasive and spread like wildfire, whether by seeds, roots, tubers, rhizomes, it results in the same thing. Because it was a trendy new plant at one time, who knows how much Patrina is out there in the wilds now?.......Maryl


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RE: Daylily Rust survey

In our area of the country, I've neither seen nor heard of Patrinia, other than from claims on the net that it has to be the alternate host of daylilies. While it may be so, that may not be exclusive. I doubt seriously if it is a contributing factor in this area of the country. I also understand that while Patrinia is grown in Japan, they do not have the rust problem like we do here in the South.

The first plant that was infected with rust in our garden (2008) was a bonus from a well-known California hybridizer. After we moved here in the summer of 2010, we had an extremely cold winter with below-freezing temperatures for at least a week. We did not have any sign of rust during the next blooming season. It showed up in the fall of 2011 with a vengeance. I did buy some new cultivars at that time.

As I understand it from research, overhead watering, night-time watering (due to our water restrictions), and application of high-nitrogen fertilizers make matters worse.

I'd like to know if any Gulf Coast daylily growers here at the forum who use only organic fertilizers (such as seaweed, etc.) are having a rust problem.

Nancy


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RE: Daylily Rust survey

Nancy, I have never seen Patrinia at any nurseries or in any garden here either. If it isn't common, it won't be available here...in fact, if it isn't a common plat for this area it is very unlikely to be here.

Sorry my experience was outside what you were looking for Maryl. I can only tell you what happened here.
kay


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RE: Daylily Rust survey

  • Posted by maryl Z7 Okla. (My Page) on
    Tue, Oct 30, 12 at 2:32

Kay: Everyone's experience is valuable, and I count yours as such. After all I've never had rust before this year and, as I said in my previous post regarding your experience, it made me think twice about taking chances. So thanks for adding it to the survey...I don't know if I've seen wild Patrinia myself, but it is still for sale via mail order. One nursery, Plants Delight, has an excellent reputation as an "out of the norm" mail order perennial nursery (have bought from them myself a time or two). As you can see by their blurb about it in this catalog link, they post no caveat about its destructive potential when grown close to daylilies (also note its seed spreading capability). Now I can't personally verify if indeed there is a relationship between the Patrinia and Daylilies, I'm just quoting what I know from the AHS about the two. And naturally if Patrinia doesn't grow in your area it could not be a source for rust....Again, thanks for everyones input.....Maryl

Here is a link that might be useful: Plant's Delight Nursery Patrinia for sale


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RE: Daylily Rust survey

I may be too late, but here's my report.
A Yes
B Yes in 2008
C No
D Yes
E 2. Only showed up in bed with new daylilies
Val


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RE: Daylily Rust survey

Another late report:
A. Did you experience rust this year in your garden?
Amazingly enough, no!
B. Have you ever had rust before in your garden?
Yes, for several years, usually centered around one or two plants. I cut back the offending plants to ground level. When I identify definite rust buckets (for me, YMMV), they're dug up and disposed of.
C. Do you spray for rust on a regular basis?
Never sprayed & never intend to.
D. Did you bring in any new daylily plants this year?
Yes, from one trusted vendor.
E. How would you rate your overall rust experience this year: Great! Hope to be as lucky next year!


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RE: Daylily Rust survey

  • Posted by maryl Z7 Okla. (My Page) on
    Sun, Nov 4, 12 at 16:06

Thank you Val and Random. Better late then never. I don't know if I can still submit it or not, but it certainly is valuable to the rest of the people reading this post on rust........Personally (and I hope I don't get flamed for this), I think too many times the subject of rust is swept under the rug or only mentioned in passing. I'm an old hand at growing roses for instance, and the thought of recommending a rose to a friend without mentioning that I've had serious disease issues with it is considered bad form. I also mention that I spray occasionally when I recommend a rose. That let's them know that if they are spray free, they may have more disease then I do...To me it ought to be the same with daylilies. They certainly don't have the disease issues that roses have, so a truthful mention of this one problem (if known) should be natural among friends. Random Harvest: Your answer to D is mine too. I do enough disease maintenance with roses, I'm not going to buy new chemicals for rust and start with daylilies too.....Now I'm off my soap box. If any of you still want to fill in the survey please do so. At the very least the rest of us would like to know. This is a good group of daylily people. I feel like I know most of you and any information that we can share amongst ourselves may save someone from frustration and costly mistakes in the future....Maryl


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RE: Daylily Rust survey

The hardest thing (for me at least) is to decide how to tell new daylily people about rust -- I don't want to scare them away from daylilies, but I also don't want people to be disappointed later when they have already bought and planted a bunch.

Nate


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RE: Daylily Rust survey

Nate, to be perfectly honest, had I forseen the daylily rust and crown rot problems we've had, I would never have gotten so involved or spent so much money on them. If I didn't really love them, they'd be history.

I think anyone new to daylilies needs to know the pros and cons so they can make their own decision -- particularly those who live in our Gulf Coast area. Hopefully, a complete cure for rust will be found soon.

Nancy


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RE: Daylily Rust survey

I just re-read that rust report by Mark Carpenter and I will be very interested to find out next season if he sprayed his DLs 5 times with Headline which is purported to kill rust. I very much wanted to get Carpenter's Palace Garden Beauty, but when I checked it out on the All Plants daylily data base, it showed that PGB is very susceptible to rust. I don't want to bring in anything else until we get some kind of grip on our rust problem, and that will be next year, too. Is planting Dls in pots well away from the other infected DLs an okay thing to do, or is that just wishful thinking? Avedon


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RE: Daylily Rust survey

  • Posted by maryl Z7 Okla. (My Page) on
    Wed, Nov 7, 12 at 16:16

Nancy: I think you gave an excellent reply to Nate. It does no good to ignore the problem or to pretend it is less then it is.... My first rose mentor told me that growing modern roses (particularly in the 80's) would mean in my climate that I almost certainly would have to spray. I made the decision that it was worth it. As my experience grew, and roses began to be bred more for disease resistance, my spray schedule decreased dramaticaly. But while I may have cursed a disease ridden rose a time or two over the years I have never blamed my mentor for pumping me up about roses, but failing to warn me about the disease potential.....My initial daylily mentor was also honest about the rust potential. Unlike roses that can get as much blackspot in New Jersey or New York as they can in Oklahoma or Texas, rust seems to be somewhat avoidable if you stick to buying daylilies from vendors that experience killing freezes over winter. I did that for years and years and never had a problem...But I still stand by the fact that I would never knowingly sell or give someone a daylily I knew to be a rust bucket without warning them about the potential problem. And if I spray for rust, so that perhaps I don't know what the cultivars resistance is, I would mention that too. It's not just the damage to that one plant, it's the fact that rust can and will spread to your other daylilies that makes it even more serious. I had to throw out daylilies I'd had for years because rust from the new daylilies spread to them. At the very least not fair. But it was my own fault for not sticking to the plan.........Maryl


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RE: Daylily Rust survey

Is planting Dls in pots well away from the other infected DLs an okay thing to do, or is that just wishful thinking?
This is a recommended procedure to prevent rust. Prepare new arrivals and pot them. Keep them quarantined through the bloom(rust) season. Inspect thoroughly before planting them into your beds.
Ed


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RE: Daylily Rust survey

Thanks, Ed, I am glad to know I can quarantine my new arrivals for next spring and keep a close eye out for potential problems. I already have three coming from the LA, and I plant to order from Blueridge pretty soon, but since these will come from areas that experience hard winters, I am not too concerned about rust---BUT I will examine every plant very thoroughly when it arrives, regardless of cold winters. Incidentally, the Palace Garden Beauty I want is offered by Blueridge, so I may take a chance and get it, hoping a very cold winter will kill any rust before it arrives here. It will be my duty to keep it well away from infected areas when it does arrive. Avedon


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RE: Daylily Rust survey

  • Posted by maryl Z7 Okla. (My Page) on
    Fri, Nov 9, 12 at 20:25

I'm starting to find out this year that with rust: "it ain't over 'til it's over". I grow most of my daylilies in pots, so now that winter is due any day now, I've begun to gather pots together for their "winter huddle". The ones that have experienced any rust at all are totally and completely separated from the non rusters. By this late date I thought I had it sorted out. So what do I discover today while gathering the last of the "herd" together? A "rust free" daylily that has been that way since spring, with the beginnings of rust. In truth it had been around some of the rusters out back, but until just now, November 9th, it had not had one single pustule on it. I really thought it was totally resistant. Surprise! Does it never end?.........Temperature wise we've had a couple of frosts (lowest 32)already, and then our normal ups and downs (a high of 61 on Monday - 79 this Friday)...... So I would offer this adivce to you Avedon and anyone else that is following this thread. Keep your eyes peeled. Until every bit of foliage is gone and you can strip the plant bare, it's not safe to assume that you have avoided rust if you've had it in your garden at all this year...My main aim in life now is to get back to the rust free garden I've had for years (if possible)....When it's finally over (as in a hard prolonged freeze that kills back all the green foliage, I'd like to share with you those varieties that have been exposed to rust, yet have remained clean or almost so. There have been some (thank goodness)...Again, let me add, while this thread is still front page, please contribute your experience on rust (even if you've had none) to the survey.....Maryl


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RE: Daylily Rust survey

Thanks, Maryl, for the good advice. It's been really awful seeing how fast the rust took over once it began. Like you, we never had this stuff until last year, I guess, can't really say for sure since I did not personally see it, but perhaps it was just getting started and our mild winter did not kill the pustules so they were ready to pop this growing season. I can tell you that some of our old diploids did not show anything, such as Hyperion, but I keep looking just in case. I believe Siloam Double Classic is okay even though most of the other DLs around it are infected. We are supposed to have a hard freeze next week, should be in the upper 20's here, but it won't last long, probably only a couple of days and then back to mild temps. My husband and I will be out examining plants again after the cold to see how they look. Like you, we want to get back to the rust-free garden we had for so long. We will spray if necessary for as long as necessary, and I plan to dig out more of those passalongs and prolifs that I thought I might keep. I have decided it is better to get rid of as many as possible. I will keep coming back to this thread as long as people post their info on the rust experience. Avedon


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RE: Daylily Rust survey

Avedon, for what it's worth, Palace Garden Beauty has never shown rust in my garden.


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RE: Daylily Rust survey

  • Posted by maryl Z7 Okla. (My Page) on
    Fri, Nov 16, 12 at 16:25

For those of us who are hoping for a cold winter to kill the rust (as opposed to a warm winter like we had last year), the local weatherman has now given us the official Wooley Bear Catapillar report. The Wooley Bear predicts a cold winter this year. Kind of good news bad news for me as I grow mine in pots. Too cold and it may kill some, but not cold enough and the rust will survive and I will kill them next year. But there you have it. The official Wooley Bear report. Garden accordingly...Maryl


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RE: Daylily Rust survey

We have had at least four days below freezing, a couple of them including this morning were 28 degrees when we got up. Then, usually after lunch, my husband and I go out and look at the dayllilies, and say "I hope that cold weather killed a lot of the rust pustules!" LOL. We are definitely hoping for a prolonged cold period, probably have to be in the 20 degree range for some time to do the job. Fingers, eyes, and toes crossed that the weather people and caterpillars have it right. Oh, I did order Palace Gardeb Beauty from Blueridge, probably won't be shipped here until the end of April, or first of May. By then, we should have some idea of the rust situation here. Avedon


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RE: Daylily Rust survey

  • Posted by maryl Z7 Okla. (My Page) on
    Sat, Nov 17, 12 at 1:53

Avedon: I tried to post this, but I guess the website has expired. The most up to date Daylily rust survey I have (which includes some of the newer cultivars on it) shows Palace Garden Beauty with only a fair to poor resistance rating. So be extra careful when you get it. This survey was pretty accurate on those varieties that I had that were listed on it. And from hard experience this year I learned that daylilies that had been disease free for years were only clean because they hadn't been exposed to rust before.....Mark Carpenter told me that a grower told him that in her experience, the temperature must go below 18 degrees for a number of days to actually kill the rust. In other words not just the 20's or below freezing (32). Last year our temps never went below 18 degrees for more then a day at most. It'a a possibility that I may have had rust overwinter on daylilies that I brought in last fall thinking that, even though the nursery has rust issues, the cold would kill it. Also I hear that rust will overwinter on the dead foliage, so next spring I will be very sure to remove any of it from around the plants....Let's hope the wooley bears are right about the cold winter - just not too cold-lol....Maryl


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