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Y is for Yellow

Posted by FarawayFarmer 9a (My Page) on
Fri, Nov 8, 13 at 12:47

Our candlestick trees (cassia alata) have been blooming since early August, and they're just about done.

On the other hand, the fall-blooming cassias (cassia bicapsularis) are nearly at peak.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Y is for Yellow

sure wish you had a bigger and closer view of these blooms.Looks gorgeous, but I cant really see them good enough.I clicked on the picture thinking it would make it bigger, but it didn't help.

jean


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RE: Y is for Yellow

Sorry about the distance. Here's a close-up picture.

John


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RE: Y is for Yellow

Thank you john, That's really pretty.Thanks for sharing it.

jean


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RE: Y is for Yellow

  • Posted by maryl Z7 Okla. (My Page) on
    Sun, Nov 10, 13 at 14:41

Both are tender perennials in our zone, so most of the time they don't over winter here. But as your pictures show, they are really dramatic in the fall landscape. At our local botanical garden decades ago I saw a C. Bicapsularious which they had overwintered for a year in the greenhouse but had outside for its fall display. I didn't know what it was so I asked what I took to be a groundskeeper hoping I'd get more then just the usual common local name which can be hard to research. She rattled it off with ease. Believe me it's a mouth full the first time you hear it. Still wish I could grow it. As your pictures show, C. Bicapsulaius is so pretty come autumn. I'd forgotten how the flowers look on it up close. Thanks so much for posting this. It has jogged my memory banks......Maryl


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RE: Y is for Yellow

Here in N central Florida 9a, the cassia alata always die back, but they start growing again in the spring. As for the cassia bicapsularis, it depends on how cold it gets. Last winter, they didn't get killed to the ground, but the year before, they did.

It also depends on how protected the site is. The ones pictured are on the n side of our house, and we're on a somewhat windy hill. Years ago, I had a candlestick tree grow to house height, and survive most winters, mostly because it was on the south side of the house and only a couple of feet away.

Location, location, location.


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RE: Y is for Yellow

Very very pretty, John.
kay


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RE: Y is for Yellow

  • Posted by maryl Z7 Okla. (My Page) on
    Wed, Nov 13, 13 at 18:40

I grow a few tender perennials here, and wonder how tall B. Capsularius might get from say a 4 inch pot in 5-6 months time. It usually heats up by mid-May and doesn't get down to hard freeze time (in the 20's or lower) until mid November. Any guesses?...........Maryl


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RE: Y is for Yellow

I don't know about growing them in a pot. In the spring of 2012, after being killed back to the ground, they grew rather tall fairly quickly. But the fact that they were planted from one gallon pots the summer before might have been a factor. Absent knowing someone who's been there and done that, all you can do is try.


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