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Prinsepia sinensis - what the heck is it?

Posted by laylaa 7b (My Page) on
Fri, Mar 27, 09 at 16:15

I saw Prinsepia sinensis on the One Green World catalog and don't know this plant at all, can't find a lot on it. Does anyone grow it? I can not find any indication that it is invasive, which is important to me, or any solid info on what ph it likes. I'm interested in the Prinsepia for birds. It's not often I do non-natives but this one looks really interesting.

of course I was on the site ordering goumi, a great non-native bird plant. :D


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Prinsepia sinensis - what the heck is it?

I planted one last year and to my surprise saw flower buds yesterday, I got mine from One Green World and just put it in the ground and it seems to be doing fine so far, I also couldn't find any real info about this plant so time will tell.


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RE: Prinsepia sinensis - what the heck is it?

I ordered one as well, so I guess we'll just both have to come back in a couple of years and let everyone know. It looked pretty interesting, I very rarely impulse buy plants.


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RE: Prinsepia sinensis - what the heck is it?

I ordered one from One Green World last spring as well. I'll say one thing about it, it's the most precocious shrub I've ever seen here in my zone. Right now, when the grass is barely beginning to green, pussy willows and crocus are the only things in bloom, and daffodils are only poking about 2 to 3 inches above the ground, this dumb thing is leafing out quite noticeably. This is about 2 to 3 weeks earlier than anything else leafs out (the earliest thing I've found before this is Tartarian honeysuckle). I hope that we don't have a late artic snap that freezes it back, but I suspect it's a tough plant that would bounce back from it if it did happen.

Dennis
SE Michigan


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RE: Prinsepia sinensis - what the heck is it?

Dennis - loved your description. You'll have to let us know if it flowers and berries, please!


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RE: Prinsepia sinensis - what the heck is it?

A quick Google search yielded this info:
http://www.virtualplanttags.com/vpt.asp?pID=31869&co=410087&cID=671&pr=1

Fruit:
Color: Red, Orange, Purple
Season(s): Late Summer, Early Fall
[Michael) Dirr says: "Red, cherry-like, 1/2" long drupe that ripens in July, August and September and is effectively digested by birds. Color is actually more orange to purple than red. Supposedly edible, contains large amounts of ascorbic acid (Vitamin C). Less sugar than most cultivated fruit plants."

And this one:
http://www.ibiblio.org/pfaf/cgi-bin/arr_html?Prinsepia+sinensis

Edible Uses
Fruit - raw or cooked. Red and juicy. A pleasant sour taste, they can be eaten out of hand or made into jellies. The plum-shaped fruit is about 15mm long with one large seed.


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RE: Prinsepia sinensis - what the heck is it?

How are they doing now? Was wanting to get an idea the taste of the fruit and amount of fruit your getting after a few years?


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