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It's a weird year!

Posted by konrad___far_north 3..just outside of E (My Page) on
Sun, May 25, 14 at 22:03

Have you noticed, ..some things are not normal this spring...well, maybe my brain is not normal anymore? lol

Like,..Dragon flies seen several day's ago already!
My Apricot is flowering, [very little] in the same time as plums...usually apricot first! I can only guess, apricot flower buds got some winter damage and have a hard time opening.

Anything you find weird?


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: It's a weird year!

  • Posted by beegood Zone 3 Alberta (My Page) on
    Sun, May 25, 14 at 23:23

I thought yesterday I saw dragon fly fly past but figured it couldn't be . Guess it might have been.Weird


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RE: It's a weird year!

It definitely is a weird spring. It snowed in early May. Then we hit the 30 degree mark on May 22 - a mark that we have failed to reach even in June for the past four summers. The ground is still frozen deep.


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Same here. Maybe they are just UFOs. :) And it most certainly has been a strange year. As I was saying on the bird thread, I was having dinner with a Junco yesterday. Not a usual sight at this time of year. And the dogs are not blowing coat either......* queue alien music* ......feels like winter out there now!

Ginny


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We also saw a dragon fly today. On the flip side, the fruit patch seems to have severe winter damage.

I have some sour cherry, plum and apple trees that appear to be dead. Others are leafing out 1st in the top half of the tree, and others on the bottom half. Very weird.

Even my Carmine Jewel all seem to have some top damage. Nothing was fertilized passed the end of June, if at all, last year. None had any lush growth that didn't have time to harden off.

Most, but not all, had like 3 inches of wood chip mulch around them. This had not decayed enough to add any nitrogen though.

Some Blueberries and Raspberry primocanes also had damage.

All varieties are supposed to be able to handle (and in the past have) zone 3 winters, except maybe the Honeycrisp apple trees.

Definitely my worst year for winter damage.


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northernmn, sorry to hear of the damage to your fruit trees, most of my U of S cherry collection did not fare well, the large bushes are looking sparse and are very slow to leaf out, The one sitting on a bit higher ground is in great condition in comparison. Most all roses were hard hit and died back to the ground.

Terrance


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I agree twrosz , almost everything that survived has been very slow to leaf out.

I've been trying to figure out why the winter damage was so bad. The ground had moderate to normal moisture content when the ground froze.

I think that I may have read that the U of S cherry collection like a fairly dry soil going into winter. But other trees like it damper. Something should have like the soil conditions.

The culprit may have been how soon the cold came. We had 30 below zero by mid December. Those temps don't usually hit until January. Maybe the wood chip mulch kept the soil from freezing as quickly as it should have? However, one of the dead trees is a young MacIntosh that had no mulch.

I wish that I could figure it out so I can minimize this kind of damage in the future. Any ideas?


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Actually the plums are about 2-3 days ahead of the apricot in terms of flowering here. What was odd is that we have already had a 31C day and it really dried stuff out. The later plants put out small amounts of new growth then stopped in the heat. I am very nervous the wild plums I've been nursing since they were plugs four years ago stopped budding. I hope they did not bite the bullet. I had oak seedlings that did this, and I hope I am wrong.


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Terrance, it's kind of odd that the one on higher ground fared better. It would have had less snow cover, more windburn, more freeze-thaw cycles, etc. Very strange.

northernmn,

I don't know if you experienced the same weather but the weather pattern up here in the Prairies was very odd this winter and created the perfect conditions for very deep ground frost. November and December were extremely cold with sparse snow cover. Then what little snow there was melted in January during a record-breaking thaw. This was followed by more bitter cold and sparse snowfall in February and March.

This was in contrast to the previous winter, which was also quite cold and long, with the difference being that snowfall was heavy. The ground frost that winter was actually less deep than normal.


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The cherries do seem slow, maybe winter was harder on them than I thought. My Evans has lots of buds but only one bloom so far. Last year it was in full bloom on May 28. Romance cherries vary -- Juliet reached full bloom a couple days go which I think is about normal, but bloom was kind of sparse. Romeo is faring best, covered in buds/blooms, at about 50% bloom. Cupid is the worst, lost of buds but only at about 10% bloom and leaves still very small, whereas last year it hit full bloom on May 22 (very thin bloom) and in 2012 it peaked on May 27 with heavy bloom, even though that never ended up producing many fruit.


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Hmm, looking at the University of Saskatchewan site tonight, I see they say Cupid is a late bloomer, flowering a week later than the other Romance cherries, so perhaps my apprehension is over nothing. All of my U of S cherries, plus the Evans, have survived to the tips of the branches, so that's a good sign at least.


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>>Terrance, it's kind of odd that the one on higher ground fared better. It would have had less snow cover, more windburn, more freeze-thaw cycles, etc. Very strange.<<

The higher the better with fruit trees in our zone, they harden off better, less water to feed. Low spots are the worst because too much green wood is going into winter, cold settles in low spots first. I get no cherries in low spots, trunk on apples get frost splits and bark kill on the side facing downhill,..cold settles there first, eventually, down the road the bark peals and looks like fire blight but isn't.

Last year I killed about 10 Evans Trees with roundup in low spots because they never produced in close to 20 years!


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I only have about a 3 ft elevation change throughout the fruit patch. All of the cherries are on the highest ground.
It looks like I lost my Northstar and Evans trees, and the top 1/3 of 4 of my 6 Carmine Jewel.

The Evans has a sprout coming out about 2" above the ground. Since Evans are on their own roots, and the truck was less than 1.5" in diameter, I may cut the trunk off just above the new bud. Should this be an angle cut to help rain drain off?


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Northernmn, wow, that sounds like terrible winter damage! Years ago I lost a Meteor cherry, and years ago I lost about half the growth on an Evans (which caused me to cut it down... I needed the space for other things anyway). But in the 3 wintersmy Romance cherries have seen, I've never seen any tip kill.

I don't think your winter chill should have been enough to hurt these... they are supposed to be able to take -40 no problem. BTW, when you say it hit -30, do you mean F or Celsius? ie -30F = -34.5C. I looked at our weather data for the downtown weather station, and on Dec. 6 and 7 we dropped to -30.6C (-25F). On Dec. 6 the maximum temp was -25C (-13F). On Dec. 22 we hit -33 C (-27F). That was some of the coldest weather this winter and it came early, and I don't see any of the damage you are talking about, so I don't think it is primarily related to cold.

Did you have any extended very warm spells, especially in late winter, followed by extreme cold? If so, that could have softened dormancy in the trees, then the subsequent cold would hit them harder than expected?

As for you Evans, yes, I would cut it on an angle, but I doubt it really matters as any sitting water would be quickly absorbed by the wood.


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Konrad and Slimy_Okra, last autumn was very dry, there had been several months without rain and I think that this has caused the damage, as the soil is chalky and free draining. These trees are very protected from winter winds and are not situated in a low lying frost pocket. In their six years, they have never before had any damage and the 'Pembina' plum and two 'Prairie Splendor' Norway maples are thriving right next to them. But, the good news is that most of them are slowly looking better from day to day, though the tree shown is very pokey, but even its buds seems to be waking up a bit and the oncoming rain and some heat should help. From here on, I'll always give these trees a good drink in the fall if required.

This post was edited by twrosz on Wed, May 28, 14 at 14:50


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This U of S cherry is looking the way it should, It was situated to hide the compost pile and had been deeply mulched and apparently is benefiting from the better moisture and nutrients.

This post was edited by twrosz on Wed, May 28, 14 at 19:35


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Terry, I think you may have hit the nail on the head! I didn't think I'd watered my cherries last fall, but then I found a garden photo from Oct. 23 where it's clear that the ground is wet around the cherries and blackberry and dry everywhere else, so obviously I did do a watering-in before freeze-up.

Here's that row today. Seems watering-in may be far more important to winter survival in dry years than I thought. The slow plant here is Cupid, which U of S says is a week slower to bloom than the rest of the series.
 photo May2814Cherries.jpg

Here's a close-up of Romeo, my most vigorous plant.
 photo IMG_9012.jpg

This post was edited by don555 on Wed, May 28, 14 at 16:31


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Don ... I had thoroughly watered all other trees and shrubs, though hadn't bothered with these cherries and we did receive a very warm and dry late summer / early autumn. In comparison, your trees are doing very nicely indeed.


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Don, It was 30 below F that we had in early December. I think that our micro area is a cold pocket. There were a couple of thawing days during the winter, so that may have been a factor.

Based on the last 2 posts, I am going to start watering in better in the fall.


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Pin cherries and Saskatoons are in full bloom here and it looks good weather wise, Carmine Jewel is going to be a progressive bloomer this year by the look of things.


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I never fall water in over 20 years,.. just because I can't..I let the cherries grow deep roots,..seems they got the message and behave pretty good. lol.

Nice flowers on that Romeo, Don!

Terrance,...what cherry you got there,..looks like a shy fruiter?


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Konrad, I do not know which of the U of S cherries this one happens to be, but the tree is now just beginning to bloom. What type of soil do you have Konrad? Mine is silty grey wooded and drains and dries fast. I do not think I've ever watered these cherries other than in their first year.

wayne61, it appears your tree has wintered well and without noticeable deer damage.


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Hey all, I'm brand new to the forum. From what I've read so far, it seems there is some wonderful information here!

I'm in Zone 3 Central Alberta. I have a the beginnings of a very small orchard that started in spring 2012 with one Honeycrisp and one Red Sparkle apple (neither of which I knew much about) It seems from my reading here that Honeycrisp could be problematic. Does anyone have experience with Red Sparkle?

Both trees survived well into 2013, at which time I added a Juliet Cherry to the mix. All 3 trees looked as if the may produce a modest crop for me in 2013, but I wasn't the only one to notice, the deer were all too happy to pick every last branch clean. A couple of page wire enclosures have hopefully solved that issue.

This spring so far my Red Sparkle looks to be in ok condition, the Honeycrisp not so much. I had to look hard to find any signs of life but there are a couple there. The Juliet seems to be reluctant to leaf out, but the signs are there also.

This year I bought a Brookgold plum. It was nicely leafed out when I got it from Canadian Tire in late April. I've been watching all sorts of you tube videos about grafting and decided to try my hand with the new plum. A friend of mine has a Mt. Royal that I took scions from. With the Brookgold still in its pot, I tried 3 saddle grafts and a t bud. Nothing seems to be happening yet. In my haste I'm sure I've made several key errors: not collecting the scions early enough, not sure if I cut the scions from last years growth or older wood (so hard to tell??), grafting to the Brookgold before it is established in the ground etc.

Unfortunately I live in the city and the trees are 45 minutes away on my father's farm, so I don't get to monitor their progress very closely. The Brookgold is still in its container in my backyard, I didn't want to damage the grafts in transport, but now it seems that is a moot point (is there any hope for them at this point?)

On the bright side, my backyard Saskatoons look good, which bodes well for the great patch of wild Saskatoons at the farm!

Anyway, there is my story, I look forward to everyone's comments and advice! I'm sure I'll learn a lot here!


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Terrance, the deer have never done severe damage yet, the tree gets a snow drift on it off the roof but the south side gets nibbled the most . That side is growing tall, now if I could just convince the robins to do their picking there... Scrub64, I planted 2 Honey Crisp trees two years ago, I caged them and put spiral wrap on the lower trunk but did not paint them and they got severe sunscald (which I knew about). I cut them off about a foot from the ground and they grew much smaller branches then what they originally had but it looks like they did not die back, need a few more days before the tips start to grow. I blew the snow away from the south and west sides this spring but did not paint them. So far so good.


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Scrub64, welcome to the Far North Forum, this is an active little group we've got going here with many eager and knowledgeable contributors.

I planted 'Honeycrisp' a few years ago, but the tree died back rather badly in its first winter, though had regrown and developed a vigorous new leader, then a nasty storm snapped that off and nothing was left remaining, I thought best to remove the mangled tree. Though, I might try again considering that some others are having reasonable success and I'd then situate the tree in my most protected location.

Using cleft grafting, I placed many grafts on my 'Brook Red' and after only four days, several were already breaking though the applied wax, others are now showing signs of life, but not all of them. For very best results, grafting requires cleanliness, speed and precision and this isn't always easy to accomplish by the amateur grafter such as myself. Of upmost importance is making clean cuts and preventing these from drying out, then being sure of tight contact between stock and scion and proper wrapping and sealing.

It sounds like your 'Juliet' is struggling a bit as are my U of S cherries.

wayne61, I do not have a fence and have been wrapping twine around my young trees to prevent the deer and moose from going at them and this has worked very well. Though, the bushes have now become large and "should" be okay without it.

This post was edited by twrosz on Thu, May 29, 14 at 12:58


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Once again my Crimson Passion cherry has no flowers. Lots and lots of growth. Already 2+ inches of fresh growth but not a single flower. This plant has never been fertilized. And how is it I had both (planted) grapes survive but my potted wild plums have passed to the great beyond? How does that make any sense?


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Had stopped in a friend's place and his cherry trees are looking the same as mine.

Collin001, these cherries can take their sweet time to produce, many of mine are 6 ft plus and only started flowering in earnest last year. I often see small nursery grown plants flowering and fruiting away, I guess being restricted in pots must induce early fruiting. My friends in Edmonton have purchased many such plants and theirs have continued to produce at an early age, I'm jealous, lol.


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Colin, unless you sunk the plum pots into the ground last fall, the plum roots would have been subject to much more severe cold than the grape roots sitting in the ground.

Your cherry looks healthy and is building a strong framework for when it starts producing fruit. This will by my cherry plant's fourth summer, and all 4 or them have bloomed every single year including the year I bought them, but getting them to set and ripen fruit has been a problem. It was really only in year 2 that I got cherries (about a half-litre, after hail wiped out at least half the crop), and those were all from the Cupid. I was hoping for things to ramp up in year 3 but a very early onset of the previous winter meant most of the cherries had almost full leaf cover all winter, and although they flowered well in the Spring, I think the buds were all messed up and I only got 3 or 4 cherries in total. This year (year 4) they are flowering well and they went into last winter fully dormant so I have my hopes up, but who knows. Anyway, I figure a few years to wait for a fruit bush or tree to start producing is normal.

twrosz - did your cherries produce fruit for you last year? If so, how much?


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Don, my Carmine Jewel has always had it's leaves killed by frost and then eventually lose them over winter, I think the Evans does the same but so far it is a dud in my yard and I had planted it first. Soon it will be no more. Wayne


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Don, after having flowered very heavily last year, a scant total of about seven cherries had been produced in total on the ten large bushes. We had experienced nearly ideal weather throughout the entire season, including June, when much of Edmonton had received wet conditions. I have never fertilized the trees and they've always grown at a moderate healthy pace, now just hurry up and produce!


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Wayne,...you might try a very protected place for these, the higher the better, [better hardening off] I'm just
borderline for Evans out in the country,..more of a zone 2, the first 8 years or so I thought that it was pointless,..always freezing back but each year they got a little larger, as the stems grew larger I then got cherries.

My Evans is flowering now low to the ground, [under the snow line]


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Thanks Konrad, as some of my trees get bigger I'm getting more protection from the elements but right now it isn't great. I was thinking low wire, lay down and cover. I had tried Frontenac before Valiant and that plant lived through 2 winters than died. Last year the Valiant never produced much, was very nasty last 2 winters, not so much extreme temps but consistently cold. These Brianna came from Northern garden collection (card says -40c to -34c). Looked on line and nowhere could I find it being tested to zone 3. WE ARE THE TESTERS or ....I did a couple of quick grafts from Carmine Jewel to Evans yesterday, just picked dormant to dormant, won't take long to see fail or growth. Both grapes and Evans are near a slope that gently flows off my place.


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Sure,..it takes a long time to establish something.

This picture from today,..Evans flowering under the snow line,
above is some dead wood, some look better.


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Weird ...don't think I have harvested meadow mushrooms this
early!


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Konrad, did many of your Evans trees sustain such damage as the one shown?

mmmm, now I'm thinking I'd love to have some mushroom soup!


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Hi thought that I would add my 2 cents. Here in Brandon the pin cherries just starting to bloom in the last couple of days. Both Valentine and crimson passion have sparse blooms ( I took out the other 3 in the series as they were my least favorite in taste and texture). Norda apple, rosybrook crabapple are in full bloom. Morden 359, Morden Russett are coming into bloom. My honey crisp is just budding out( I have noticed that the Minnesota apples always bloom later)this is an off year for the Mn 449. As for the grapes- my brianna is several years old coming into bloom as is Swenson Red, montreal blues, kandiyohi, I lay them on the ground in the fall and snow cover keeps them alive. The original Brianna vine was at my parents place in Dauphin and has produced full crops for over 10 years. It was on the south side of their house. My valiant is budding out to the top. Tulips are in full bloom and the hydrangea are just budding out. I've never had such an overlap of blooming seasons.


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Kayakcraig did your parents also lay down and cover Brianna, I would like to get an idea how cold hardy the plants are. My Valiants are just putting out growth at the head of the vine so far but there has been a lot of sap flow out of the canes. The Carmin Jewel cherry also looks like it will have a small amount of fruit this year, last year there was a lot. Thanks, Wayne


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Hi Wayne.
For the first couple years we took down the vines and depended on natural snow cover. After that the vines were left up all winter. Never seemed to have any damage. I did thin the crops in heavy set years so the fruit all ripened and the vine would still shut down for winter.


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>>Konrad, did many of your Evans trees sustain such damage as the one shown? <<

I find a little more then half.

>>My honey crisp is just budding out<<
kayakcraig 2b
WOW...for zone 2b you're doing pretty good!
I have a hard time getting it going here.


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Konrad, you have Evan cherries in the city too, correct? Are they doing OK? How late did they bloom?

In the city, my Evans (single tree) was very late, but did flower well. I've been away for the past week but when I returned today (June 7), the Evans was only a couple days past peak. It's still a young tree, but I have grown Evans in the past also, and I always think of them as flowering in late May. Here's my tree on June 7, first a whole-tree photo that is a bit washed out I think, then a closer shot of the blossoms.
 photo June714EvansJustpastpeak1.jpg

 photo June714EvansJustpastpeak2.jpg

And for the heck of it, here's a pic from today of my Cupid cherry (Romance series). This is the last of the Romance cherries to bloom for me, and it is quite a bit later than Carmine Jewel, Juliet or Romeo, but I think it is further past peak bloom than the Evans, maybe by an extra 2 days or so. In other words, it now has only about half the blooms that it would have at peak bloom.
 photo June714Cupidpastpeak2.jpg


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My Carmine Jewel is really taking it's time, no peak bloom, just a few flowers here and there constantly. The tallest part, south side away from the building is not looking great, it is pushing out some growth but looks like the top is dying, the bottom of that stem has good growth. It is not the first time that I have lost a part of this cherry.


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>>Konrad, you have Evan cherries in the city too, correct? Are they doing OK? How late did they bloom? >>

I used to, here in Beaumont but it died two years ago, never had a issue for around 20 years, we replaced it with another from people we know who claim it's a sweet cherry,..but looks like Evans and most likely is.

The Evans out on the orchard are in bloom right now,..looking back from 2012, this year, blooming about a week later, same with other fruits.

Put in a little Cupid and Crimson Passion two years ago but still little,...so they got some old manure! I can tell, not as vigorous then Evans.


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It is common for romance cherries not to produce until til year 4 cupid maybe year 5 Although they are said to be self fruitful I believe they set heavier with cross pollination.Years with over lap with my Evans seemed to produce heavier set. of the Romance series Cupid is said to be the genetically the most different from from the rest.I have not tried Rose cherries but I think they also may be good if bloom times overlap


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It is common for romance cherries not to produce until til year 4 cupid maybe year 5 Although they are said to be self fruitful I believe they set heavier with cross pollination.Years with over lap with my Evans seemed to produce heavier set. of the Romance series Cupid is said to be the genetically the most different from from the rest.I have not tried Rose cherries but I think they also may be good if bloom times overlap


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Okay, this is year 4 for me... fingers crossed!


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Your cherry trees look very good Don, if they don't set fruit this year I would say they need more neglect, LOL. Best of luck, they will still drop a lot , maybe half unless you have better pollinators then I get. Wayne


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enjoyed reading through all of these notes


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From snow the other day to summer temperature,..I'll take it!
Gosh...that deep freeze we had the other day makes trees loosing leaves, 2 weeks early. I was cocking at 29C. picking apples,..they're dropping like flies, and wasp like you wouldn't believe! ..Thank you Diane!


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Konrad, yes, the leaves have realllly colored and many are dropping fast since that severe killing frost ... but, now we're in a mini heatwave with near 30 C temps today, enjoy the heat while it lasts, it surely won't stick around for long.

In these parts, it was a very late start to spring and an abrupt end to summer, though pretty much ideal weather in between.


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Yes and,.. forgot to mention, on the weekend seen Dragonfly,...they at least had a long season!


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My Double Delight raspberries are just kick'n into gear, the forecast looks good for this week so far. I think that I will leave the canes and let them produce again next year to see how they do. Quite a variable taste to them so far, some I picked to soon. This is there second season in the ground.


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The weirdness extends into fall. Yesterday i noticed that some Shirley poppies have buds on them, and one of my daylilies has just thrown up two scapes!


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Severe killing frost struck my region in early September, while being a disappointment and shock to the system to have that snow and cold then arrive and take out the tender plants, still plenty of color and interest had remained and I was able to do an extra early clean up by ripping out those blackened annuals and proceed with moving perennials and shrubs around and have them re-establish plenty of new roots in the warmth that has dominated afterwards. At times, I've otherwise experienced somewhat poor results or even losses when transplanting late in the season, so I actually wasn't too disappointed with the previous cold snap ... today, it's gonna be close to 20 C and I'll be enjoying the fine weather while continuing the yard clean up.

BTW, if you already haven't begun to do so .... WATER in your trees and shrubs before the ground freezes, it's been soooo dry here! I also have a few more bulbs to get in the ground.

This post was edited by twrosz on Tue, Oct 14, 14 at 10:55


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Another weird thing was I had zero aphids this year.

Thanks for reminding us twrosz. Fortunately with all the growth I have had this fall I have had to keep on it.

My garlic, planted not even two weeks ago, is punching through the soil already...

Well out to do yard work....

SCG


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SCG, there had been tons of aphids here until late summer when the wasps and yellow jackets came out in droves and cleaned up on them. It was a very dry summer with hardly any storms passing through with heavy rains that otherwise would have helped to knock back the aphid numbers. The new growth on the plum trees and undersides of the leaves had been grossly covered in thick masses of aphids, though by late in the season, the trees were completely free of the pests as they became lunch for the wasps, mother nature does have her ways!


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Quite interesting twrosz as they forecasted a big year for yellow jackets but I have to say it was the best year I can remember. Maybe the freeze thaws that got the plants got them too!!!

I am amazed at the number of bees that are still showing up to my flower beds. The 'Bacopa' is going nuts this fall.

SCG


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I don't remember this many wasp in the past,...been trapping some because they killed one of my bees hives by cleaning them out of all their honey, I should have checked sooner.

These pictures from yesterday, honey bees cleaning up the honey from left overs when extracting, [some honey in the wax]
welcome food when the nectar source has ended over a month ago at the first frost.


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You see the mixed race, from Italian's to Carniolan black bees.


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Close up..


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Zero aphids here too. But I had (and still have) tons of grasshoppers.


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Nice pics Konrad. I am amazed at the number I have on my 'bacopa' flowers right now. Starting to think someone close has a few hives.

This was the best year I can remember for pests. I know I will pay next year LOL!!


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This is the first year that my Carmine Jewel cherry is changing color, usually the leaves freeze green, turn brown then stay on the tree most of the winter, they are changing color and dropping. I've noticed this with a few other plants also. Linden's were color less this year again.


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I've just dug out the last few things from the vegetable garden - leeks, some overlooked carrots, some carrots and beets that i planted in late July that never did much, and some little shoots of broccoli from plants that won't give up. Amazing. As i walk through the flower beds, i see new growth in a few places. Those plants are going to get a rude awakening in the not-too-distant future.... And next year, i think i'll plant one container with angelonia, lobelia and verbena and see how long it will keep going. All those things are still blooming in containers right now and i don't have the heart to dump them!


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Konrad, so had the wasps had entered the bee hives and eaten the honey? I had thought that the honey bees would have been able to fight them off?

Marcia, our weather is forecast to take a bit of a tailspin here after today, so we've also been busy pulling the beets and digging the carrots ... and one thing for sure, I had planted toooo many carrots and am not at all pleased with the 'Sweetness II' and wonder if we had received the wrong variety, cause these are very HARD textured and with an unremarkable flavor, definitely not good for fresh eating, though a decent cooking type. Thank goodness we have lots of 'Rainbow' carrots to enjoy.

Soooo, much to do yet before the snow flies, it's hard to believe it'll soon be November!


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RE: It's a weird year!

Wayne you should get some pics for us!

Marciaz3 I am in the same boat. I was surprised at how much growth has occurred in the past while. I am refusing to pull it all up until I have too. Next year I am going to due way more cool weather flowers AND more asters :)

Twrosz you are a far more diligent, hard working gardener than I. I try to get the most out of the least work possible!!! I also know I won't do everything I should have done before the snow comes before the snow comes. But really, what is gardening unless the ground is frozen and white?

SCG


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RE: It's a weird year!

Our tailspin begins on Wednesday - letting you hang on to it until then! I don't have a lot left to do - rake some more leaves and spread them around when the ground freezes, and dump those three or four containers that are still blooming. I don't always get the in-ground annuals pulled. I'm not overly diligent either.

Our carrots are good and sweet - not that we got a lot of extras. The two rows i planted later, as i mentioned, did nothing at all. Dh is going to build another couple of raised beds next year and we're going to try to plant as much as we can in them. Hopefully we'll get more of everything then because we sure aren't getting much in the way of production out of the ground itself.


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RE: It's a weird year!

>>Konrad, so had the wasps had entered the bee hives and eaten the honey? I had thought that the honey bees would have been able to fight them off? <<

Yes,..usually a strong hive can fight them off, this was a weak hive from a swarm and was building up, it was about a month after I hived them when it happened, bees starved, lots were heads down in empty cells. They had too much room, I should have pushed them into one box. Always something new and still learning,..never ending.

Another weird thing this year, didn't get any carrots!..Seeds never germinated! Looks like I got some old seeds, didn't buy any this year, the ones I still had from who knows how long ago, ...they need a long season, didn't re-seeded because of it.
Do you buy new seeds every year?


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RE: It's a weird year!

I do, mostly. Most seeds are good after a year, but many i replace every year. It was beans for me this year, all new seed and i had to plant them 3 times before any came up!


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