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Is Chip Budding really that Easy?

Posted by nutsaboutflowers 2b/3a (My Page) on
Wed, Jul 27, 11 at 1:33

twrosz mentioned chip budding in another post, so I looked it up on YouTube because I didn't know what it was. I'm still not exactly sure what it is.

However, is it as easy as they make it look?

One woman also used honey when grafting a stem from a rose onto another rose bush. Really? That easy? Can't be......


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Is Chip Budding really that Easy?

I'm sure Konrad can give you some great help with this. By the looks of his friut trees he does all kinds of grafting.


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RE: Is Chip Budding really that Easy?

Yes, it's very easy, you can do it now with new wood/bud.
I would do it if I had allot of time on hand right now but I don't.

My preferred grafting is bark grafting, [scion in spring]

Here is a link that might be useful: Bark Grafting


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RE: Is Chip Budding really that Easy?

Awesome link Konrad. As usual, your pictures tell a thousand words. They kinda make a person want to give it a try =:) Thank you.

Have you ever heard of anyone using honey for grafting rose bushes?

I believe you generally stick to fruit trees, but I'm wondering if you, or anyone you know, has ever used it?


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RE: Is Chip Budding really that Easy? Cont'd

Konrad, I forgot to ask.

Why do you use two different types of tape on the same graft? Electrical tape is easy to get but is the second tape you use breathable? It looks like it is.

I saw use of breathable tape on YouTube. Is it necessary?


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RE: Is Chip Budding really that Easy?

Thank you ..
I've never heard of honey...it might do the same thing as the sealant I use?

The electrical tape is to hold tight the chip/bud or scion, the other tape, [parafilm] is to prevent from drying out the bud or scion and you can just leave it on, new growth will push through it and will fall off by itself.

Here is a picture of 2 chip graft's done in spring, sweet cherry onto pincherry roots stock, [grown out] you can do the same with roses but just slightly below ground.
On the bottom graft I didn't put a tape on top and the chip slightly lifted on me...then I sealed it up a bit.
Photobucket


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RE: Is Chip Budding really that Easy?

Chip budding is not difficult. I first learned Cleft grafting. Then Konrad taught me Bark grafting which I mastered. Now I do both Chip budding and 'T' budding. 'T' budding is similar to Konrad's bark grafting. The 2 differences are that (1) for Bark grafting you have to cut of a branch whereas in 'T' budding you do not have to. (2) You use a 2-3 buds scion in Bark grafting but you only use 1 bud in 'T' budding. The similarity is that you have to slip the bark and place the scion wood or bud under and then bind up. With Chip budding you have to be very careful to match the cambium of the bud to that of the rootstock. If you match well and the bud is good you have a take/success. If you are in Edmonton it would be a pleasure for me to show you.
Sengyan


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RE: Is Chip Budding really that Easy?

Thank you sengyan for the gracious offer, but I'm far far away in Saskatchewan.

When I get some time I think I'll try one or two of these methods. It looks really rewarding.

Thank you both for the information =:)


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RE: Is Chip Budding really that Easy?

Now you have opened up a whole new world of gardening for yourself. :-) It is just as addictive as straight gardening.


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RE: Is Chip Budding really that Easy?

Yes, chip budding is very easy and has a high rate of success. Here's a bud about one month after being inserted. I had used painters green masking tape to securely hold the bud in place and keep in moisture, I like this tape because it is not too sticky and comes off easy when removed. I have not always been the most successful with other forms of grafting, I guess I'm just not good enough at it, lol.

Photobucket


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RE: Is Chip Budding really that Easy?

Oh, everyone here makes me want to try this out.

I sure wish I had gotten some good $5.00 buys on a few roses, as I would love to try to get two different colors on a rose bush.

twrosz - what did you "sprout" and what did you graft it onto?


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RE: Is Chip Budding really that Easy?

The "sprout" is 'Royal Red' Norway maple, this has been chip budded upon rootstock of a few Norway maple seedlings that appeared next to the mother trees I planted a few years ago, these seedlings had regular green foliage.


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