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beets going to seed

Posted by trisha_51 z4/5 Alaska (My Page) on
Sat, Jul 24, 10 at 21:25

I have noticed more and more beets sending up seed stalks and wondered why they were doing this since they are a biennial, so googled and found that it's our cool summer over here that is causing it. We are having lots of below 50 degree weather at night. Well, I guess I will try saving seed! :)


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: beets going to seed

Hi, I'm in wasilla and things are the same here. Wondering if the cool temps were the problem.I don't have beets this year, but my radishes went to seed and they haven't matured enough to even have radishes. What a year, and they are even in the greenhouse. I have alot of tomatoes,but don't know if they will ripen.Flowers and hostas are doing great though.Geez, I need some sun!


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RE: beets going to seed

I decided to pull most of those sending up a stalk. Was surprised to find the stalk very tender yet, and bulbs of a decent size! Very tasty. :)


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RE: beets going to seed

Wonderful! Bon-appetite, Judy


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RE: beets going to seed

I have this problem with spinach. I put it down to the days getting shorter. The effect in Alaska would be stronger. Of course if you normally don't have a problem, shorter days is unlikely to be the cause.


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RE: beets going to seed

I noticed the poster stated that beets were biennial. I suspected this but did not know for sure. So this means beets here in Indiana will winter over? If so are the roots edible? Or maybe a more pertinent question, are they as tasty as the first years growth. I've never had a beet sprout seeds so I'm curious to see them do so.

Also how are beet seeds supposed to be harvested and prepped for storage?

Any information would be appreciated :0)


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RE: beets going to seed

Not certain of the answer to your question, but my recommendation would be to havest what you want this Fall, and forget overwintering. I've never tried it with beets, but carrots left in the ground here over winter tend to be mushy by Spring. Parsnips will overwinter and grow back in Spring, but again the texture suffers so badly you just won't want to eat them.

Any onions you missed will grow back with early green onions in the Spring, and those are good to harvest in Spring. Everything else I'd ignore.


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