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Carmine Jewel Cherry Tree

Posted by troman1973 z4A (My Page) on
Wed, Dec 12, 07 at 19:23

I think this topic may have been talked about before, but I was putting a order in with Gurney's tonight to get a Carmine Jewel Cherry tree and the guy kind of scared me off from purchasing it. I know it is a sour cherry tree, but according to the magazine the flavor beats the taste of sweet cherry trees. Not sure how this is possible. I know it originated in Canada and is a hardy tree, but I am wondering if anyone has grown or tasted this tree? I ended up ordering something else and not sure if I made the right choice. I have wanted to try a cherry tree, but I dont want one that tastes bad. I know it takes a long time to get cherries and I dont want to waste my time if it is not good. Also alot of the chokecherry trees in my area have the black knot disease. Is this something that will hurt this type of cherry tree?? I am looking for any info on this tree and would appreciate any help, I have gotten good help here before!!

Thanks


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Carmine Jewel Cherry Tree

I planted one this fall, so I am also interested in hearing what others know about it. I also have wild chokecherry trees that are prone to getting black knot in the bush around our acreage.

With the sale price at the local nursery and the gift certificate my kids gave me for mother's day, 3 different cherry trees cost me just over $10. I couldn't pass that up. It just took me a while to figure out where to plant them. I ended up putting each of them in the center of a flowerbed.

Brenda


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RE: Carmine Jewel Cherry Tree

I don't have the tree in question but if it's like the other hardy prairie sour cherries, yes the cherries are sour but they do sweeten up quite a bit if allowed to ripen on the tree for a while.

I read somewhere that sour cherries are used in liquors, pies, preserves as they have better flavor than sweet cherries. I have a cherry tree called 'Rose' cherry, actually it's more like a large shrub. It's shown good hardiness and the one winter it did winterkill, it rebounded back pretty quick. It bloomed after about 4 years, and that was starting from a 5 inch high cutting.

I know this information doesn't really pertain to the Carmine Jewel type but I thought I would offer my two cents as perhaps all the prairie sour cherries share similar characteristics. Not sure about the black knot thing though.

Glen


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RE: Carmine Jewel Cherry Tree

Your missing out if you don't give these a try. I worked at the U of Saskatchewan here in Saskatoon and every now and then the Horticulture people let us pick fruit to take home. It was a real treat to walk through the cherry planting and eat them fresh off the bush. Slightly tart but very tasty and we have made our own pie but find them a little too strong to use in jam or jelly. We were using a mixed lot so not just Carmine Jewel. The Carmine Jewel is especially good for a high antioxidant (dark red) content for juice. There are folks here from Saskatoon who are using it in making ice cream. The whole group from the U of S are pretty tasty but you would need to find the one that suits your growing conditions well.
Check out the information on the DNA site below. Or read about them on the University of Saskatchewan web site.
http://www.usask.ca/agriculture/plantsci/dom_fruit/

Here is a link that might be useful: DNA Gardens


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RE: Carmine Jewel Cherry Tree

cmmwiebe

Thanks for the link, some very interesting info on their site.

But, I could find no info on how to order. Do they sell & ship to the public??

There was a link for Prices but it did not work.

cathy


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RE: Carmine Jewel Cherry Tree

You can Email them, go to Catalogue, scroll down all the way.
Konrad


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RE: Carmine Jewel Cherry Tree

I have a Carmen Jewel in my back yard and love it. I'm training it to be a tree and it is now a little over 7 ft. tall. The cherries seem to get sweeter each year especially if you leave them on to get super ripe. My neighbours are jam makers and fight over the berries. My one pruned "bush"/tree gives more than 3 ice cream buckets each year - great jelly and syrup / although the maintenance man at the condo prefers to eat them off the tree as fruit.

Fern


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RE: Carmine Jewel Cherry Tree

Carmine Jewel is a particularly good choice for regions experiencing very cold winters, but should not be restricted to those.

CJ, introduced around 1998, is one of a group of six 'SK' (University of Saskatchewan) cherries (the rest introduced in 2006). These are ultra-hardy, to climate zone 2, and produce high-quality fruit. As they become better known, they will surely be in great demand.

Strictly speaking, because their parents, used in the decades-long breeding program, were all 'sour' cherries (better known as 'tart' cherries in the USA) the SK's, including Carmine Jewel, are called 'sour/tart' cherries; but this is misleading with regard to the experience you will have in eating them, raw or processed. They are delicious. The standard pie cherry for a very long time has been the Montmorency, a 'sour/tart' cherry with a brix number of 12 (brix number is % sugar). Carmine Jewel has a brix of 17. Other SK cherries are even sweeter, with Juliet at 20 brix and Romeo at 22 brix, for example; the latter two, as well as the Crimson Passion and the Cupid all have sugar contents comparable to Bing 'sweet' cherries, and to harvest grapes. But 'sour/tart' cherries have much, much more cherry flavour than 'sweet' cherries and their citric acid component makes them even more interesting/desirable to consume. Some find them excellent right off the tree, but they also make superb pies, jams, juices, and wines.

'SK' cherry trees are highly productive dwarfs, growing to seven feet in height and four feet in width, allowing them to be spaced five feet apart from each other (although Crimson Passion is a smaller, less vigorous tree than the others). Carmine Jewel is considered to also have ornamental value and can even be planted as a hedge with closer spacing if desired. All the 'SK' cherries are self-fruitful, meaning that they do not require a second tree for cross-pollination. Truly, they are a horticultural breakthrough.

Carmine Jewel is dark red in skin and flesh.

Here is a link that might be useful: Prairie-Hardy Cherries


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RE: Carmine Jewel Cherry Tree

Any input on the black knot concern? I have three baby Carmen Jewel bushes, the oldest 2 years old. I haven't seen any black knot on them so far. No cherries, either.
Northwoodswis4


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RE: Carmine Jewel Cherry Tree

OK...after several years now, how is Carmen Jewel making out for you, ..would love to see some pictures.


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RE: Carmine Jewel Cherry Tree

Still no cherries in 2012. We had drought, the bushes survived with a few waterings, though the foliage was yellower than the rest of the garden. I am hoping for at least a taste in 2013. Northwoodswis


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RE: Carmine Jewel Cherry Tree

A article out of the U of S by Bob Bors states that "the trees show excellent resistance to black knot, but a few cases of bacterial canker have been noted."

So, sounds pretty good, but it is probably possible for them to get it.

If you are worried about Crimson Jewel being too sour, why not get Crimson Passion or Juliet? They are supposed to be sweeter(though still tart)


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RE: Carmine Jewel Cherry Tree

My Carmine Jewell is FINALLY blooming this year - after being in the ground for 6 years. This is the first winter I did *not* winter prune ... and lo and behold I have flowers all over the tips of the branches! (on last summer's new wood) I'm so excited!

Going forward, I will only summer prune after harvesting the ripe cherries, giving the shrub a chance to put on new growth before going into winter.


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RE: Carmine Jewel Cherry Tree

Hello newbie and welcome!
Great to hear your tree is flowering,..hopefully it sets fruits, when cherries are red, let them on the tree at least another week, you might need to net it, all pie cherries can hang on the tree allot longer then sweet cherries,.. making them allot better!
Then show us a picture!

When you look at the very top, this is a cold zone thread,..our cherries need about another 2 month until they flower.

In your profile, we encourage that you fill in the climate zone, looks like you're way up,...around zone 5 or 6? Then we can understand better from what we're dealing with.

My gosh..it's been 7 years since the first post,....please, everybody report back on how things are going for you.


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RE: Carmine Jewel Cherry Tree

I didn't plant any U of S cherries until May 2011, so they've had 3 growing seasons in the garden now, and 2014 will be #4. They have flowered every year, including the year I planted them, but fruit set has been very minor, with just a few cherries produced in each of the last 2 years, mostly from the Cupid plant. Here they are on October 23, 2013, showing some slight difference in turning colour for the fall (Juliet is furthest along). From left to right, it's Romeo, Juliet, Cupid, Carmine Jewel. They are about 5 feet tall and 3 feet across, I think the photo makes them look smaller for whatever reason. The past two years they reached full bloom around May 20-30. Maybe they'll start producing well this year?.. hope so. That's a blackberry plant in the background along the fence, and Swiss chard and carrots growing behind the Carmine Jewel.
 photo Oct2313UofSaskCherries.jpg


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RE: Carmine Jewel Cherry Tree

Don, Are you fertilizing your Carmine Jewels? If so, what type and timing are you using?

I have 6 CJs, and mine haven't had quite as much growth as yours. Mine we also planted in 2011, but were VERY tiny. They are nice and full like yours, but just not as large.

Do you think that you will have to spray and cover them to get a pickable crop? (Birds and Bugs)


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RE: Carmine Jewel Cherry Tree

Northernmn, I fertilized them when I first planted them, but not since then. I blame the fertilizer in year 1 with an infestation of aphids on the new growth. Also, the cherries are one of my last bushes/trees to drop their leaves in the fall and I think fertilizer would encourage them to be even later. The photo above was taken October 23, we're running the risk of some pretty hard freezes by then.

I suspect the main reason mine are ahead of yours is size at planting time. Mine were mail order and were shipped to the downtown bus station. When I arrived I was shocked to find they were in 4 seperate pots, five gallons each! Made for an interesting walk out to the parking lot. Here's a pic of the Carmine Jewel on May 21, 2011, about 2 weeks after they arrived.
 photo May2111cherrycarminejewel.jpg


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RE: Carmine Jewel Cherry Tree

As for pests, I have grown other sour cherries (Evans/Bali, and I think Meteor) in the past and they were never bothered by bugs, without ever spraying. I do currently have an Evans planted beside a row of saskatoons, and the robins love eating the saskatoons and picked a few cherries too in 2012. Last year I covered the young tree with bird netting and ended up catching a bird that I think just wanted to use the tree as a perch. Managed to cut it free without it being hurt, but decided I didn't want to trap birds so removed the nettng. I didn't pick the cherries for several more weeks, and didn't appear to lose any to the birds. So, the short answer, I don't think netting is needed.


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RE: Carmine Jewel Cherry Tree

I have a Carmine Jewel that is over 10 years now, voles will chew the bark, deer will eat the tips of branches, robins fight over the fruit and black aphids like the new growth. So I control the ants, that minimizes the aphids. The deer have pruned one side of the tree, if you want all the fruit that is possible have a net or something ready. It only took a couple of years and every offspring that tasted cherry came to feast. My tree produces a good amount of fruit but took 5 or 6 years to start and seems to handle some frost when it is flowering.


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RE: Carmine Jewel Cherry Tree

Don, You are correct about the size difference at planting time. Mine were in little 2.5" pots and the plants were about 8" tall. They are about 30" to 34" tall now and last year they put on about 15" of new growth. Mine a certainly are shaped like yours, but about 1 year behind.

I'm hoping to get my 1st CJ blossoms this year. I have a Northstar that has been feeding the birds for 2 years now. My Evans hasn't bloomed yet but it is still young as well.


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RE: Carmine Jewel Cherry Tree

northernmn, I'm hoping for my first good fruit set this year. Or at least a cup or so of cherries on each variety. As mentioned above, they've all flowered the past 3 years, but fruit set has been poor. Supposedly once they start to set one year, they are loaded with fruit the following year and thereafter. My Evans (planted in 2010) has been a more reliable producer for the past couple years, though still light production. The Evans are nice, but I prefer the Cupid fruit by quite a bit -- much "meatier" and richer in taste.

wayne61, 5 or 6 years to start producing fruit? Ugh, this is only year 4 for me. When you say your Carmine produces "a good amount of fruit", how much fruit are you talking about from one plant?


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RE: Carmine Jewel Cherry Tree

Don I never kept a good record, I browse every time I mow the grass and the birds start testing before the cherries are ripe. The tree blooms for about 2 weeks if the weather is good so the cherries ripen over time also and as has been stated the longer they stay on the bush the better they get. Last year I bagged about 4lbs. after browsing. The cherries have more pectin when unripe if you are using them for a jam or jelly.


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