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Black Mission in NC

Posted by Yeehova 8a (My Page) on
Sat, Mar 22, 14 at 9:30

Is anyone growing Black Mission in Nc?


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Black Mission in NC

Yes.

Several. Just don't place one in the ground unless it's 2+ yr old. And winterize it every year for several winters.

Dennis
Charlotte, NC
Zone 8a


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RE: Black Mission in NC

Thanks for the tip. I eventually want them in the ground but I am just now starting cuttings so I'll probably overwinter them in the greenhouse for the first couple seasons. Do yours taste good in this climate?


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RE: Black Mission in NC

"Black Mission" is reputed to be one of the finest tasting figs. Other varieties are often compared to "Black Mission" for judging flavor, and I am sure that perfectly ripened "B-M" grown in your area will be exceptional, too. This variety makes a large tree and is a very good producer. In your climate area, you can expect two crops.

In my opinion correct culture is everything. Ditto, for judging the optimum ripeness, and, when to pick. Restrict the water at the roots when figs begin to ripen, and, you'll approach Nirvana.

This variety along with "Bensonhurst Purple"/ "Hardy Chicago" are probably two of the finest tasting and easiest to grow, "premium" figs. Both of these varieties are easily found, and, easily rooted from cuttings.

There may be a few pedigree varieties that are better, but try to find them at reasonable prices, and then, try to root the cuttings.

Frank


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RE: Black Mission in NC

Thanks for the advice. I do have two Hardy Chicago in the ground but they were rooted a little over a year ago and did not give me edible figs the first year. I had them in pots last year and due to circumstances, neglected them more than I should have. I have just recently planted them and I am hoping for success this year.


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RE: Black Mission in NC

I left many unplanted figs out in the yard in pots all winter long with absolutely no care. Remember how cold and terrible it has been. These included one VDB, one LSU Purple, two mystery yellow figs, and a few others. My point is that figs are perhaps more hardy than you think they may be. I used to baby my figs just like everyone else, but really, these days I only give them a little water and mulch and let them do their thing. With over a dozen trees in ground (all less than 6 years old) I have had no recent die back or any other winter damage since 2010.

that is just my .02


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RE: Black Mission in NC

I think if I hadn't moved houses a few months ago I would have just planted them in the ground but after I kept them potted in preparation for the move it was just easier to keep them that way until the greenhouse was set up. This year was terribly cold and as I type we are just at freezing again. I hope the cold at least killed off some of the stinkbugs.


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RE: Black Mission in NC

I have 2 Texas everbearing figs in pots that I placed in an unheated shed for the winter in N. Virginia. They seem to have survived fine after this very cold winter. I also have a celeste and a brown turkey in the ground, but the frost ussually gets the fruit before it is ready to harvest. I am now propagating hardy chicago, black missin, and fico nero in my basement under lights. All are doing well, including one that has a little fig, but no leaves yet. When I put these in the ground, what is the best way to protect them in the winter?


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RE: Black Mission in NC

I think in my area you just need some mulch around the base of the tree, but we just need to mulch things like elephant ears and they come back just fine. You may have to take more elaborate measures. I know your winters are a good bit colder up there.


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RE: Black Mission in NC

Here is a picture of the best of the black mission cuttings I started.


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RE: Black Mission in NC

Top view


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RE: Black Mission in NC

I planted a Black Mission in the ground last fall in Richmond VA. It got killed to the ground with the harsh winter, but is just budding out now, so it survived.

So, if it can survive that harsh of a winter, on its first year, planted too late, in 7b, it'll probably be fine for you.


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RE: Black Mission in NC

I think that I will try this out outdoors this year. I dont mind if it dies back to the roots next winter if that is what it needs to do to survive in my climate.


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RE: Black Mission in NC

So far it is showing nice signs of growth. I like the posts that show plant growth so I guess this is as good a place as any to update the growth rate.


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RE: Black Mission in NC

Side view


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Black mission?

So this is the ebay listing I bought the cutting from:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/3-Cuttings-of-Black-Mission-Fig-Purple-Fig-Cuttings-3-/291147681244?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item43c9c10ddc

The cuttings themselves were very high quality. I got two of three to root successfully and only messed up one by trying a different method. I wonder if this is actually Black Mission though. Based on the pictures provided, what variety would you say this is? I am not trying to knock the vendor, but I would like some more input. Thanks.

Brian


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RE: Black Mission in NC

Who likes fig trees?


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RE: Black Mission in NC

This little one does.


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RE: Black Mission in NC

So I decided to plant one in the ground and keep the other in a pot. Here is the one in the ground.


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RE: Black Mission in NC

I re-read all the comments posted in this thread. Many of you are thrilled that your "Black Mission" trees survived the cold winter, have re-sprouted, even after being planted either in the ground or in pots.

It's good that your trees have lived to see another season, but what's the point if your trees die back to the roots every year? You will, each year that this die-back occurs, be essentially growing the equivalent of rooted cuttings. When trees die back to the roots all the tree's reserved energy is diverted into regrowing all the damaged roots and wood that had the potential to bear figs. This cyclical die-back needs to be prevented if you ever want to harvest and taste figs.

If you have a very long and very warm growing season, this die-back may not matter, but for those who grow in the short-season, cooler climates, (Zones 6-8) the warnings posted by "snaglpus" (2nd post down from top) should be heeded. Sooner or later the cold winter weather will eventually kill or badly damage your trees, regardless of whether you heavily mulch, and/or use protective measures.

The point of all this is to do whatever needs to be done to get your trees to ripen figs, and not to grow new stems and leaves each season. Green stems coming from older roots are not mature, cold-resistant trees, and will behave according to the dictates of Nature.

Post #2 says it all.

Frank


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RE: Black Mission in NC

Frank, you are right of course. Is it wrong that I want to see what will happen? I understand that you and Snaglus have more experience than me and are offering your experience to me for free and I believe that you are correct, but that is being outweighed by the fact that I am impatient and have planted one of these trees in Florida as a test of two climates(gifted to my nephew). I know I should follow the good advice of Snaglpus but the irrational part of me think that next winter must be milder than this one! I am also leaning toward not keeping any containerized fig trees unless I decide to airlayer or start cuttings late. I will be sure to post pictures next year though to show the aftermath. I do expect some dieback and I will provide some protection. We'll see how it goes.


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RE: Black Mission in NC

Update pic from today. Notice how the green stem has lignified on the lower portion.

This post was edited by Yeehova on Wed, Jul 23, 14 at 21:36


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RE: Black Mission in NC

Update on progress. I removed all but two late figs. I am not sure that they will have time to ripen.


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RE: Black Mission in NC

Profile


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RE: Black Mission in NC

2nd fig. There were 7 or 8 others that would have already ripened had I not removed them. I was focused on growth of the tree itself but I wish I had kept a couple early ones because I really want to taste this fig before winter.


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RE: Black Mission in NC

Another pic


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