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Best Figs for Containers

Posted by thefigman 7 (My Page) on
Tue, Mar 9, 10 at 20:26

Hi you'all,

Can someone please tell me what Fig types are the best for containers? I know of some such as Paradiso Fig, San Pietro Figs, Golden Honey, and White Triana, where is the best place to buy them?

Thanks a bunch for your help,
TheFigMan


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Best Figs for Containers

  • Posted by ejp3 7NY (My Page) on
    Tue, Mar 9, 10 at 21:09

Where are you located?


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RE: Best Figs for Containers

I have seen lots of members pictures of figs in containers that have done well like Negronne, Marseillies VS, Atreano, Verte, Hardy Chicago, Sal's, Dark Portuguese, Golden Celeste, LSU Gold, Hollier etc

If I lived in USA, I would most likely buy from Encanto Farms, Gorgi, Herman, R.Watts & Bass . These sources propagate their own trees, have variety and are fig experts. Reliability as well as you know what you are buying. There are other individuals who are reliable in their supplies but they are less active than the named ones.


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RE: Best Figs for Containers

Hi again,

I live in Dallas, TX and the hardiness in this area is 7B. This year I plan on planting some Fig trees, but I would like to do my homework first and learn what kind of of Fig trees grow well in containers where I live (Dallsa, TX).

Thanks,
TheFigMan


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RE: Best Figs for Containers

The fig varieties that you mentioned are available from Joe Morle ......see link below. He has recently added a few more pictures of the figs that he sells on his website. He also gives some very good information on growing figs in containers...so, check out his other link.

Dan

Here is a link that might be useful: Joe Morle's Figs


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RE: Best Figs for Containers

Hi Dan, Thanks so much for the contact name. I will give Joe a call this week to order some Fig trees.

This forum is great, the thing is I joined it about an hour ago and got some responses right away, you guys are great.

Please let me know if anyone has any other suggestions.

Thanks,
Shaun the FigMan


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RE: Best Figs for Containers

  • Posted by ejp3 7NY (My Page) on
    Tue, Mar 9, 10 at 22:49

Come to think of it I have not had a problem with any cultivar in a pot. I have a few similar varieties in pots and in the ground and the ones in pots do almost as well. I know the literature says black mission wants to be a monster so it may not be a potted candidate but have yet to see this myself. Pick a variety you like. In your location I think you could grow almost any variety. No sense growing something just because you can. Figure out what tastes best and try that.


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RE: Best Figs for Containers

Joe is a great guy and sells some very nice trees. I really like the extra care and attention that he gives to the packaging of the trees that he ships thru the mail.

With "thefigman" as your user name, I take it you are a fellow fignut like many of us and believe you will really enjoy this forum. Welcome.

Dan


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RE: Best Figs for Containers

  • Posted by mrhappy z8 - Austin, TX (My Page) on
    Wed, Mar 10, 10 at 0:42

Joe has added some new varieties since I ordered from him. Thanks for the remider to look him up. His packaging is tops along with a well known member of this forum.

thefigman,
I grow in pots about 200 miles south of you. Several of the figs you mentioned work fine in pots. There is one fig I do not own or have experience with that is supposed to perform well in pots - Petite Negri. Several members of the forum have owned this plant and may be able to comment.

Here is a link that might be useful: Check here for varietal information


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RE: Best Figs for Containers

ejp3 - I used to have had a mission and golly that thing grew like 5ft in a pot within a year. I am glad I don't have it after 2 seasons. There's a mission tree in Vancouver & my friend tells me its huge.


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RE: Best Figs for Containers

The only fig I might argue against being grown in containers is LSU Purple. It's roots seemed to grow much faster than other trees. The rest did pretty well.

~james


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RE: Best Figs for Containers

James, interesting observation......

Maybe it's those fast growing roots of the LSU Purple variety that makes it nematode resistant.

Dan


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RE: Best Figs for Containers

  • Posted by tapla z5b-6a MI (My Page) on
    Mon, Mar 15, 10 at 9:18

.... and maybe it's something in the genetic make-up of the plant that makes it less desirable as a host for nematodes, if it is less desirable. It's extremely unlikely that the speed with which roots grow could hold any sway over how susceptible to nematode attack a plant might be.

Al


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RE: Best Figs for Containers

Figman,
no problem for me growing in containers, challenge is getting them to ripen before cold sets in my area.
In your area growing fig plants in my opinion would do well because of climate, like EJP stated find some types you like which can take at least several years growing them, tasting them and getting rid of ones that you dont care for their taste.
Encanto farms, Trees of Joy,Edible landscaping,Maggies Mediterrean are some that i have dealt with.
There are more that i have not dealth with and are probably good also like durio and raintree nursery easily googled.
Martin


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RE: Best Figs for Containers

All of my fig trees are grown as Mother Nature intended.......IN THE GROUND. My comment regarding James's observation is based with that mindset.

It is easy to see that rapid root growth of any IN GROUND fig tree is an advantage in its ability to outpace the root attack from those slow moving nematodes. This may explain what was observed at the LSU test orchards (all in-ground fig trees by the way). Data suggests that LSU Purple is nematode resistant and not immune to attack.

It is unlikely that the speed of root growth of CONTAINER GROWN TREES would be of benefit given the confined root space of the container.

Dan


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RE: Best Figs for Containers

  • Posted by gorgi z6b NJ (My Page) on
    Mon, Mar 15, 10 at 15:15

As already stated, the LSU Purple is touted as RKN
resistant (but not immune). A while back, I was tempted
(playing with a very deadly fire) to do an experiment
to see just how it actualy behaves.

Well, I never did; wonder if anybody did it...

If indeed it does have that good-root-quality, it may also
be a very good candidate as a root-stock (aka fig grafting).


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RE: Best Figs for Containers

  • Posted by tapla z5b-6a MI (My Page) on
    Mon, Mar 15, 10 at 16:50

"It is easy to see that rapid root growth of any IN GROUND fig tree is an advantage in its ability to outpace the root attack from those slow moving nematodes."

You're kidding ..... right? Why is it easy to see?

"It is unlikely that the speed of root growth of CONTAINER GROWN TREES would be of benefit given the confined root space of the container."

Please expand and offer some support for this. You must have used some sort of reasoning to come to these conclusions - or borrowed the thinking from a reliable source you can name?

I just can't see a squad of nematodes running a footrace with roots, trying to catch up to them, unless I'm not interpreting what you said correctly.

Al


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What is faster a nematode or hair(root) ?LMAO
And their Off. coming around the club house turn, down the final stretch it's the root by a hair but wait.... photo finish... the nematode is riding the root

Sal


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RE: Best Figs for Containers

Not to get in a hankie fight but context is important.
Specific to a lot of breeding populations in the animal world is they rush, herd, school, migrate, et cetera which helps with not getting eaten and keeping preditor populations at a low level.
For instance, fish like sardines, herring, and Salmon only get in dense populations during breeding. By being dispersed their concentration is too low to support a large preditor population. When they do come together preditors do not have the numbers to kill them all so their strategy insures breeding success. Migration performs a similar function in that less mobile preditors can't become a large population since their food supply is seasonal.

For figs the same type of rules apply within the limits of a plant. It can't move so it goes dormant which prevents most things that would eat it from establishing a permanent high population. To be specific a fig root does not have to move faster then a nematode. All that is necessary is the biomass of the roots to increase faster then the nematode population increases by eating them. It is like that for virtually every plant from apples to zucchini.

Rick


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RE: Best Figs for Containers

  • Posted by tapla z5b-6a MI (My Page) on
    Mon, Mar 15, 10 at 19:01

It doesn't work that way, Rick. The explanation you offered is like saying a puppy can't die of a parasitic infestation because he is growing too fast; or there is no reason I can't run up 100 flights of stairs if only I make sure I run fast enough.

RKN's inhibit a plant's ability to grow (in several ways) and slow it's metabolism. The slower the metabolism and more restricted the growth, the more reduced are the bio-compounds that help the plant resist the infestation, which makes it easier for the nematodes ....... See where this is going?

Al


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If anything, you would think that a faster growing root would be a detriment. RKN reportedly only enters through the tip of the root. So, the more ground the tip of the root covers during growth, the more chance that the root will encounter RKN itself.

This could be completely illogical, but it seems not much more off base than saying that roots of a tree grow so fast that the RKN isn't able to keep up.

The reality is probably something more along the lines of ... due to some genetic condition, the tip of the root for this variety is not AS conducive to allowing RKN entry, if anything.

As humans, we come up with very creative ways to explain how or why something happens the way it does. Sometimes the reality couldn't be farther from the truth.


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RE: Best Figs for Containers

  • Posted by tapla z5b-6a MI (My Page) on
    Mon, Mar 15, 10 at 22:54

Yes - that genetics would be responsible is what I mentioned in my first reply, so I agree completely. When we look to the ability of a cultivar or variety to consistently prosper in the face of adversity that would have greater negative affect on others of the species, we look first to genetics for the explanation. That certain varieties of apples are resistant to apple scab or fire blight is a genetic trait - just as would be any fig cultivar resistant to FMV or RKN.

There could be one or more factors that combine to either make it physically more difficult for the RKNs to attack the roots or the plant might simply mount a number of genetically encoded responses to (insect) wounding.

In plant cells, there are genes that control proteins functioning in defense, sending defense signals, altering metabolism, controlling cellular maintenance, and regulating photosynthesis, as well as many genes of unknown function. In short, plant energy reallocation is prioritized in the plant's own defense, & plants that are genetically capable of mounting the strongest response are going to be better able to resist.

When wounding occurs (nematode attack) there is a "wound response" that occurs both at the site of injury as well as distally (in other plant parts). Plants can even differentiate between the wounds of a pin and those of insects and react in different fashion to the "attack". Without getting more technical, the plant produces various anti-feedants, anti-metabolites, and toxins in its defense; and again, those plants genetically able to mount the strongest defense and make the insects feel pretty unwelcome are those that will prosper.

To be fair, vitality can play a significant role alongside vigor in this response, but vitality goes to a plant-by-plant basis where genetic vigor speaks to the whole of the cultivar.

Al



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RE: Best Figs for Containers

My opinion (and it is only my opinion) is that the pace of root growth for fig trees does not prevent them from a nematode infestation. It does, however, minimize the impact of the infestation. Meaning there are sufficient uninfected roots to maintain the top of the tree. As roots become infested, there are new roots growing to keep supporting the tree.

I've mentioned before: every fig tree growing in the ground in the Houston area that I have inspected is RKN+. The parent tree of a variety that was highly sought after a few years ago among those trees I've seen with RKN. The owner's comment when I pointed out the gals was (paraphrased) "If it is this productive with RKN, all my trees should have it." In my backyard. The trees I have in the ground were RKN+. Most of the trees in containers did not. Those that were RKN+ were more susceptible to other problems (rust, leaf hoppers, etc.) but they remained vigorous growers and producers. While I am not suggesting it is because of the RKN, only 5/110 of my containerized fig trees survived last year... 4 of them are RKN+.

~james


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RE: Best Figs for Containers

999,998............999,999.........1,000,000. OK, I've cooled off and can now comment. Save the popcorn for later.

AL says: ".... and maybe it's something in the genetic make-up of the plant that makes it less desirable as a host for nematodes....." and Jason says........."The reality is probably something more along the lines of ... due to some genetic condition..."

WOW fellows.........how silly of dumb ole me to put forth a theory which gives a very plausible and specific reason WHY LSU Purple is nematode resistant. Apparently James can see too that a vigorous root growth gene can help explain its resistance. Thanks James for posting that info.....I will be doing some follow up research work based on this theory that you have helped implant in my mind.

But thanks also to you two other guys for your more insightful explanation why LSU Purple is RKN resistant........ "It is nematode resistant because of its Genetics". WOW again. How come dumb ole Dan did not think of that very scientific sounding reason. I will keep that brilliant deduction in mind as people ask me more questions about their figs.

When Genny asks me: "WHY does her Brown Turkey split".....I will say it is because of some GENETIC condition and will refrain from trying to get specific and saying....BT splits because it has an open eye and during rainy periods this allows water to be absorbed faster inside of the fig than its skin can accommodate thereby causing the skin to split.

And when Boudreaux questions; "WHY are my Celeste figs so Bug Resistant? I will henceforth say....it is because of some Genetic condition. No need for silly old me to get specific and say that Celeste has a closed eye which prevents bugs from getting into the figs.

WOW thanks guys for that UNIVERSAL ANSWER which will always be 100% correct to all forthcoming questions about the growing and fruiting characteristics about all figs........."It's because of the fig's genetics". Sounds great and very scientific; but, when your really think about it......it doesn't mean crapola!! Most everything about any growing organism can be blamed or credited to "Genetics". I now see why it takes months for a trained horticulturist to write and post his fig rooting method on this forum as was promised. Dumb ole Dan was able to write and post his rooting method in much less than an hour.......go figure.......

Joking aside......Nematodes are not necessarily present in every square inch of soil around a tree. Nematodes live in the top layer of soil and can not tolerate soils that are high in clay content. It is not hard to SEE or REASON that fast growing roots could/would grow into areas with no nematode populations. RKN infected trees lose their vigor due to a diminished/impaired root system. Anything that helps improve the root system of a tree that is growing in an RKN infected area can and will make the tree more tolerant of nematodes. Yes, LSU Purple is nematode resistant and it is likely resistant because of some genetic condition. That genetic trait might well be its "rapid root growth" as I have theorized.

Dan


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RE: Best Figs for Containers

Dan,

I'm sorry I wasn't more specific in my post and distinguish between two different ideas:

1) LSU Purple in a container would, in my experience, require more frequent root work due to the faster root growth. It isn't the first tree I think of when thinking of containerized trees.

2) The observations I've made regarding RKN+ trees in Houston and their continued productivity pertains to all trees, not just LSU P.

Now the tie in. Younger LSU P trees may be more resistant to RKN because the rate of root growth means there is sufficient clean roots keep the top alive. However, if the other varieties are established before the onset of RKN, their roots will outpace the buggers as well.

One can test by placing an LSU P tree in a container with an RKN+ tree (or growing mix) and see what happens. Since the roots (and the RKN) are trapped in the container, they should be infected within a couple of months, if I am correct. If the roots are clean, perhaps it is some other trait of LSU P which causes it's RKN resistance.

BTW... I tried this several years ago. I placed a small LSU P and a Petite Negri in the same hole which was known to have RKN. Unfortunately the trees were too small and I may have forgotten about them being there while mowing the yard. Anyway, that was the end that experiment.
~james


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RE: Best Figs for Containers

I understand. Thanks.

Dan


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RE: Best Figs for Containers

  • Posted by tapla z5b-6a MI (My Page) on
    Sun, Mar 21, 10 at 13:17

First, the likelihood of there being RKNs to infect the roots of your tree, but NO nematodes some short distance removed from where you planted your tree is so highly unlikely that to base anything on the supposition is false reasoning, and that is the basis of your argument, since you abandoned the original. Tomorrow, apples might start falling upward, but the possibility is nothing we should base today's theories upon.

Once roots are infected, it's like a pinch in a pipeline, and no matter how fast the root grows, or how many times it branches, the ability of that root, and thus, the tree are impaired.

The root-knot nematodes are obligate endoparasites that complete most of their life cycle within their host roots. Nematodes survive in soil as eggs AND larvae.

Mature females of root knot nematodes deposit usually 100s of eggs in a sack on root surfaces, which protects the eggs from dehydration. The infective second stage juveniles hatch from the eggs and move through the soil in search of roots. The juveniles usually penetrate host roots just behind the root tip region and establish their special permanent feeding sites in the vascular tissues of the root, which provides nutrients for the nematodes, which continue to feed, enlarge, and molt several times. Root cells around the feeding sites enlarge and form galls (knots) and extensive secondary root formation and branching of the main root, which offers tremendous opportunity for the RKNs to reinfect the host.

Eight paragraphs of sarcasm insinuating that I was vague and you were specific couldn't have been further from the truth. I think that when I offered: "Yes - that genetics would be responsible is what I mentioned in my first reply, so I agree completely. When we look to the ability of a cultivar or variety to consistently prosper in the face of adversity that would have greater negative affect on others of the species, we look first to genetics for the explanation. That certain varieties of apples are resistant to apple scab or fire blight is a genetic trait - just as would be any fig cultivar resistant to FMV or RKN.

There could be one or more factors that combine to either make it physically more difficult for the RKNs to attack the roots or the plant might simply mount a number of genetically encoded responses to (insect) wounding.

In plant cells, there are genes that control proteins functioning in defense, sending defense signals, altering metabolism, controlling cellular maintenance, and regulating photosynthesis, as well as many genes of unknown function. In short, plant energy reallocation is prioritized in the plant's own defense, & plants that are genetically capable of mounting the strongest response are going to be better able to resist.

When wounding occurs (nematode attack) there is a "wound response" that occurs both at the site of injury as well as distally (in other plant parts). Plants can even differentiate between the wounds of a pin and those of insects and react in different fashion to the "attack". Without getting more technical, the plant produces various anti-feedants, anti-metabolites, and toxins in its defense; and again, those plants genetically able to mount the strongest defense and make the insects feel pretty unwelcome are those that will prosper.

To be fair, vitality can play a significant role alongside vigor in this response, but vitality goes to a plant-by-plant basis where genetic vigor speaks to the whole of the cultivar." it was a considered response based on a sound knowledge of plant physiology - nothing whatever to do with whether or not a root can outrun "those slow-moving nematodes".

Al



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RE: Best Figs for Containers

Sorry Al.....but, fig roots can and do grow into soil areas with lesser nematode populations in them. Much of the Mississippi River delta soil in South Louisiana has a layer of clay beneath the top soil. Nematode populations are nil in that layer. In the South, in areas where RKN contaminated soils exist, it is common practice to plant fig trees near buildings and/or concrete slabs. These plantings are made so that a fig tree can survive RKN infections and still produce fruit. This practice works because of nil populations of nematodes under the building and slabs. Roots that grow there are able to get the nutrients that the tree needs. New roots are able to grow and supplement/replace those that become too infected and dysfunctional.

COMMON SENSE....COMMON SENSE....COMMON SENSE tells one that any fig tree with a genetic trait that RAPIDLY produces a larger ROOT MASS than another fig tree SHOULD make it more tolerant of RKN populations when the tree is grown in the ground. RKN tolerance becomes evident by the fact that an infected tree continues to survive under those adverse conditions and produces fruit year after year. Contrary to your belief, the theory that I have suggested is very plausible. As I've stated, I will keep that theory in mind as I continue my observations on the several hundred fig trees that I have access to which are growing in different areas and soil types. One other area of my fig root related interests is to learn if fig trees do in fact exhibit several leaf/root flushing cycles during the growing season as do Citrus trees. My initial observations tell me that they do........time will tell.

.........still having trouble finding the time to post your written fig rooting method??

Dan


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RE: Best Figs for Containers

  • Posted by tapla z5b-6a MI (My Page) on
    Mon, Mar 22, 10 at 12:19

We're not talking about all fig trees or about foundation plantings, we're talking about the inherent genetic trait of a particular cultivar. Concentrating on what trees can/could/might do is too vague - faulty reasoning and painting with much to broad of a brush to have any practical application to this conversation. We are interested in the fact that a particular cultivar of F carica is somewhat resistant to RKNs, and common sense tells me that it's not because 'rapid root growth outpaces those slow-moving nematodes'.

Al


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RE: Best Figs for Containers

Al, I'm not sure you have grasped the context of my post even now. It has nothing to do with how fast a worm can crawl or the linier speed of root growth. Please do not characterize my responses as that. One more time, it is not about "slow-moving nematodes."

It has everything to do with the life cycles. If you like I will post information about the dormancy cycle, time to go from egg the infectious stage, and suggested remedies that include promoting vigorous growth to lessen the effects of RKN. While I ack your knowledge on the topic and the fact DNA is a componet, VNF varieties for example, I do want to point out that the "both sides" position of this includes respected organizations such as UC Davis.

Rick


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RE: Best Figs for Containers

I agree with what Rick says........"All that is necessary is the biomass of the roots to increase faster then the nematode population increases by eating them..."

Sorry again AL.......common sense tells some that a fast growing root trait can help a tree survive and grow in nematode infected areas.

Rather than continue to argue and stamp on a theory that affects few forum members......why don't you use your valuable time and finish writing your fig rooting method and post it like you said you would do?? Really, how long does it take one to put their preferred fig rooting method into writing??? Did I miss your posting it??

Dan


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RE: Best Figs for Containers

Wow. When did taunting other people become the best, most logical and mature way to prove your point? Speaking of "stamping" things for newbies. I'm sure they're putting a huge stamp of approval on this community when some folks lash out at others...

Call me confused?


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RE: Best Figs for Containers

Wait a minute. If confused, go back and re-read the beginning of this thread. I have given the OP (thefigman) the EXACT information that he was looking for. Any information that I post is usually very accurate and reliable. At least I am willing to share some original thoughts and ideas with this community. In this thread, following James's observation, I put forth a very simple theory about LSU Purple's resistance to RKN that some deemed necessary to stamp on.....not the first time.....probably won't be the last time. It was just a heads-up on my thoughts and what I will be keeping in mind as I observe the growing and fruiting characteristics of many fig trees.

Dan


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RE: Best Figs for Containers

  • Posted by tapla z5b-6a MI (My Page) on
    Mon, Mar 22, 10 at 18:35

Hi, Rick. For the record, I wasn't referring to anything you said in any of my posts, so I'm sorry if you thought I was. I was pointing to the same folly that you are - that how fast/slow RKNs are has nothing to do with the discussion. I simply laid out a couple of much more probable reasons the plant might be resistant - reasons with their roots in actual physiology, not in abstract theory, and was again roundly abused for the comments several times over.

There is really no need to continue the conversation. I simply wanted to point out that the reason is rooted in genetics and has nothing to do with how fleet or dawdling a nematode is. I am glad to see Dan has abandoned that position in search of one more tenable.

Al


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RE: Best Figs for Containers

I have not abandoned any position whatsoever.......it is quite easy for anyone to re-read and understand my thoughts with all of the clarifications that I have posted after this very first posting on this theory........

"James, interesting observation......
Maybe it's those fast growing roots of the LSU Purple variety that makes it nematode resistant."

Interesting that some allow themselves months to write and post their fig rooting methods on this forum....but, expect others to write with perfect clarity on their very first attempt to share a new theory with this community......very interesting indeed.

Glad to read that Al wants this particular side conversation to end. I do too.


Dan


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Very interesting indeed.!! The post was Best Figs for Containers then turns into RKN and then becomes another Pissing Match and Who has a better rooting method posted or not
Very Interesting Indeed

To Shaun The Figman You have been given some good info for a start in search for potted fig varieties. It is a shame for a new member to be exposed to this type of behavior There is another forum which will provide many answers to your questions with out the in fighting but some just like it and some just ignore it
Sal


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RE: Best Figs for Containers

Sal, that's kind of my point. I see it came to a head with taunting, as I pointed out. This particular series of commentary was completely and totally unnecessary, and primarily what I was referring to:

Rather than continue to argue and stamp on a theory that affects few forum members......why don't you use your valuable time and finish writing your fig rooting method and post it like you said you would do?? Really, how long does it take one to put their preferred fig rooting method into writing??? Did I miss your posting it??

Seriously, I just don't get it. I don't get why we can't just get over the rooting method nonsense. Is there ANY thread in the Figs forum that is safe from Dan jumping in and jabbing at Al about not having documented his rooting method?

Can we get over al's rooting method already and start talking about the subjects at hand? The other 99.9% of us here don't want to talk about Al's choice to publicly publish (or noit publish) his rooting method.


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RE: Best Figs for Containers

As a purely disinterested observer satellitehead, may I point out that this exchange started much earlier in the thread and was not initiated by Dan.

As far the bickering goes, I completly agree with you. But if you're going to take the side of the guy who started the argument with his sniping, that is where we diverge.

Most of us saw this coming long before the comment you choose to focus on.

Now...how 'bout we go back to discussin figs...

Dave


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RE: Best Figs for Containers

Hey Dave, I agree. It may not have been Dan who started the "sniping". The thing that's driving me nuts is that I feel like I can't read any thread around here anymore without seeing incessant taunts from Dan about Al's (absentee) rooting method.

Just for the hell of it, do me a favor. Look at the subject of the thread, and read the first couple of posts. Now use the find feature in your browser to search the page for the word "rooting". If your results are anywhere near mine, somehow Dan has brought up Al's rooting method THIRTEEN TIMES in this thread about figs in containers. I have to stop and ask myself: seriously, what in the heck is going on? If I had five bucks for every time Dan brought up Al's rooting method here lately, it'd have paid for another dozen fig trees in my collection.

It's just old at this point. I'm over it, and I know others are too.

Dan, can you step up and be the bigger man, and just call it quits, realize that your taunting about rooting methods is not likely to discredit Al, nor cause him to post his rooting method out of humiliation? I would *LOVE* to get back to talking about something OTHER than Al's rooting method, and I would love it if we could see the constructive posts we've come to love and expect out of you again which DO NOT involve Al or his rooting method.


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RE: Best Figs for Containers

Jason,

I am a very easy going guy and perfectly willing to share some great fig related information and my experience with this forum. As you already know, some of that information is quite unique and useful. That sharing is OK and fun for me until someone feels a need to continue stamping on my posts, ideas, or suggestions. This thread was going along fine until someone felt a need to again stamp. It is my nature to respond in kind whenever that occurs. As I've stated before, in another thread....I have absolutely no problem in stopping whenever the other parties stop too.

I only weigh two hundred and thirty pounds.....is that big enough of a man for you?....lol.

Back to other more serious discussions on figs......

Dan


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RE: Best Figs for Containers

Just 'cause I was born in the Big Easy doesn't mean you can shake me off that easy ;)

Let me make one last observation on this thread, take it or leave it. It's simply to point out what others are seeing right now.

This is how the thread breaks down:

---

TheFigMan: Curious to know what some good pot varieties are. (Several suggestions follow).

James: States LSU Purple is a bad choice due to fast growing roots.

Dan: "Maybe it's those fast growing roots of the LSU Purple variety that makes it nematode resistant."

Note - Point made by Dan, no stamping yet

Al: ".... and maybe it's something in the genetic make-up of the plant that makes it less desirable as a host for nematodes, if it is less desirable. It's extremely unlikely that the speed with which roots grow could hold any sway over how susceptible to nematode attack a plant might be."

Note - Counterpoint made by Al (alternative explanation), plus assertion of opinion, still no stamping

Dan: "All of my fig trees are grown as Mother Nature ... "

Note - Counterpoint and assertion of opinion from Dan, with what appears to be YELLING included. (FWIW, YELLING looks like stamping to me.)

Al: "You're kidding, right? ..."

Note - Request for clarification on points, with strong assertion, and some return-stamping.

Al: (response to Rick)

Dan: (A few assertions, harass Al about his rooting method, then more assertions)

Al: (Explains his reasoning and responses, makes some counterpoints)

Dan: (A few more assertions, more YELLING, harass Al about his rooting method.)

Al: (Tries to bring topic back to center)

Dan: (Agrees with Rick, provide no new info, harass Al about his rooting method.)

Me: (Points out that this thread isn't about Al's rooting method)

Dan: (Explains events in thread)

Al: (Apology to Rick for any confusion, reassertion of original assertion)

Dan: (Clarification for Al, harass Al about his rooting method yet again.)

Sal: (Expresses what 99% of us are thinking: What the hell happened to this thread? How did we get so far off topic? What kind of example is being set for newbies here?)

Me: (Agrees with Sal)

....

That is basically what just happened, and how it looks to many others. I think we're all bored to death, tired, or frustrated with hearing about Al's rooting method, or seeing petty attacks between Al and Dan, regardles who starts them. It's one thing to START them, it's another to NOT RESPOND.

I seriously do not want to hear another word about Dan's rooting method! So over it!

Let's talk about figs in pots already?


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RE: Best Figs for Containers

Wow.

That's a lot of effort in documenting the flow of this thread.

Personally, I kind of see where Dan is coming from. He puts a lot of effort into sharing his thoughts and findings with others on this forum. It can't feel good to be criticized harshly when he was trying to offer some common sense advice to the poster.

Dan, thanks for all the info that you've shared with us.

Joe


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RE: Best Figs for Containers

Jason,

I hope that you get your fig fix real soon. Spring is in the air and maybe your trees will be fruitful this year.

You too can choose to NOT RESPOND as well to my posts.....even when I discuss my preferred rooting methods that I will definitely refer to in future threads. I will not be bullied or intimidated by anyone. I will continue to express my viewpoint and share relevant fig related material in a very civil manner until such time as someone AGAIN chooses to TRY "stamping out misinformation" as he has directed specifically at me. It is no fun for me to post something only to have to endure another sniper attack. I was on the receiving end of another targeted attack by this same individual who boldly declared that he was "specializing in stamping out (sic Dan's) misinformation". His misinformation stamping directive is a matter of written record in another thread and he seems to be living up to this. It included attacks on my posts on my preferred fig rooting methods. In his opinion my posted written methods were laughable while his undescribed, unwritten methods were much superior. That's the connection to rooting methods......unfinished business over a "claimed" superior method to other posted methods.

Again, I will positively stop whenever other parties choose to do the same. Looks like one other individual has recently chosen to stop and I really appreciate that hopeful sign....

......can we please move on now??

Dan


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RE: Best Figs for Containers

  • Posted by tapla z5b-6a MI (My Page) on
    Tue, Mar 23, 10 at 19:10

Oh brother. In defense of myself, Dan has been absolutely and continually obnoxious and provocative toward me since before Christmas when I simply noted that sterile media was a better choice for repotting any type of cuttings. This continued, and continues in threads I don't even participate in. Now, he's playing the victim and acting as though I've eaten his young. There was no sniping here. Dan simply made another statement that made absolutely no sense. I made a simple statement with an alternate explanation based on science, not theory, and he started shouting, as usual. In my next post, I asked him to please explain himself, because it made no sense, and he went absolutely ballistic, writing 8 abusive and sarcastic paragraphs ....... so please don't lay the blame at my doorstep.

Hey - I said it before, if the forum consensus is such that misinformation shouldn't be corrected, or someone is above having to explain themselves, then I have lots of other things I can be doing. I hold myself to a very high standard when it comes to the accuracy of what I say, and I don't post guesses or untested/unproven theories that fly in the face of settled science. I know what I'm talking about, and I don't operate at beyond the limits of my knowledge, which is the cause of a LOT of problems on these forums. Anyone can see that I'm always friendly and cordial unless I'm treated poorly, and I always allow plenty of room for alternate opinions when they make sense. If they don't, I tend to correct misinformation or offer alternate thinking, which I look at as a service to others. I tend to answer more technical questions because that's where my strength lies.

The fact is, Dan cannot take any form of criticism, and cannot accept the idea that he might be wrong, or there is something he might not know. He's proven this over and over in altercations with many others. He still holds and acts out a terrible grudge because of an offhand comment last December, bringing it up again and again as justification for going off on not only me, but on others as well. Take a look at my posts on this forum where I don't have Dan trying to run roughshod over me and others, and you'll find them exemplary. Then, take a look at the Dan's continual sniping in posts that he participates in that has been occurring since before Christmas.

Al


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RE: Best Figs for Containers

  • Posted by ejp3 7NY (My Page) on
    Tue, Mar 23, 10 at 19:56

The thing I think is ironic is that I love the 2 forums, and there seems to be more snickering on this one than the other but I always check this one out first. I have probably learned the most about figs and potted soil science from Tapla and Dan. If they want to argue, who am I to dissaprove. I have learned more from (or due to their) arguing and different beliefs. Dan and Tapla, keep up the good work and dont back down brothers.


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RE: Best Figs for Containers

I don't even care about the back-and-forth so much, especialy when it's educational. I'm just soooooo incredibly tired of hearing about "Al's rooting method". It's a dead horse already. I do really enjoy the peace and quiet, calm and friendly discussion at F4F, though.

It truly was a lot of time (3-4 minutes) to document the thread, but I wanted to make sure I was accurate, and did a good job of depicting how many times Dan beat the dead horse.

Al, can you just post some crazy rooting method already and put your name on it? ;) Sounds like that may be the only way the rest of us can stop the torture of hearing about it every other post.


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RE: Best Figs for Containers

  • Posted by ejp3 7NY (My Page) on
    Tue, Mar 23, 10 at 20:49

Hey I like the peace and quiet of F4F too but am not crazy about someone trying to sell me more figs or cuttings all the time.


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RE: Best Figs for Containers

Its just a matter of time and the mods will edit this thread or totally remove it. I've seen it happen before here. In the words of Rodney King "Can't we all just get along?"


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RE: Best Figs for Containers

We learned here on the forum that high humidity with high temperatures combination can rot the cuttings. We also observed here, and in some other similar threads, that exclamatory words with circasm start spoiling the thread and one can easily pin-point the start. Remove these parts and the rest is wonderful information.


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RE: Best Figs for Containers

Hi Figman,
i truly hope you found an answer to the thread started by you.
In this thread there have been some things that should not have been said otherwise that does not pertain.
My experience as thru out the years i have seen a few members tossed is that there can be a fine line and an unexpected email at anytime they want to any member that does not follow the guidelines can be sent by GW and 1 risks a suspension or kicked off the forum.
Read terms of service number 6 paragraph 3 im sure some folks may not have ever read the tos area of GW.
It really is best sometimes between parties to take it to emails and not risk losing there membership because it will eventually happen in time otherwise i and others have seen it.
I dont want that to happen it would be a loss to the rest of the membership.
This is all i will say on the subject and i will not respond on this post.
Best Health
Martin


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RE: Best Figs for Containers

For the record.......

I DO NOT POST ANY MISINFORMATION.....let me repeat that I DO NOT POST ANY MISINFORMATION. What I post is based on verifiable facts which can be verified by anyone. I would really appreciate AL allowing me the courtesy to express my viewpoint without his declared position of stamping on whatever information that I bring to this forum that is not in his particular Bible. Contrary to his beliefs, he is NOT the sole harbinger of good science. I bring a vast knowledge base to my fig hobby. I know how to apply science in everyday applications. Science moves us on. Better practices are just a part of its application to methods and procedures.

Funny how some people get a bee under their bonnet whenever anyone posts anything that is not in agreement with their beliefs and/or prior postings. Let someone post that triple thirteen fertilizer worked in improving his plants and wait for Al's speech on how he should have used fertilizer with the correct nutrient ratio's. Poor guy is probably reluctant to post his findings ever again. It is NOT Al's role to stamp out what he believes is misinformation. Certainly questioning while maintaining an OPEN MIND is perfectly fine and should be encouraged. However, assigning one's self a role in stamping out misinformation that does not happen to agree with one's particular fig Bible is a completely different matter. That really needs to stop.

Now that everyone has had a chance to make their final comments on this matter can we now move along........... and perhaps get along??????

Dan


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RE: Best Figs for Containers

  • Posted by chills Zone 6b Mi (My Page) on
    Tue, Mar 30, 10 at 22:17

I like growing figs in containers....

I agree with the consensus that growing in containers requires a good draining mix with particle size large enough to prevent perched water and a wick to help remove such water that does happen to accumulate even in such a mix. I have a raised bed frame in my back-yard in which I place my potted figs and I bury them at least halfway with wood chips just after moving them outside.

I will agree that LSU purple does grow roots quickly, but it is far from the most vigorous root growing fig I've got. I think it was 143-36 last year that I had to cut out of the ground. I half expect that the mulch covered roots (over an inch in diameter) I severed might spring forth this spring and take over the fig bed I have prepared.

I hope this year is more productive than last as the cold weather seemed to really slow my figs production

As tempting as it is to prolong the previous discussion (and I don't recall adding to it previously) I will restrain myself, even though I do have a comment which does bear mentioning to the ongoing disagreement.

~Chills


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