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Tying down branches to root new figs?

Posted by wertach 7 SC (My Page) on
Tue, Oct 11, 11 at 15:38

I did a search, got "not so good" results. I have a huge fig tree and it has set roots on many branches. They are too big to dig up, plus I'm lazy! LOL

I am thinking about tying some branches down to start some new trees. Can I do that now or should I wait until a different time of year? I would like to have some transplants next spring or fall that are easy to dig.

Also when should they be transplanted?


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RE: Tying down branches to root new figs?

  • Posted by lukeott 7 south jersey (My Page) on
    Tue, Oct 11, 11 at 19:30

do a search on air layer. i'm new to figs so advice might not be right, but here goes. I would wait till next spring and do air layers. It takes 6 to 8 weeks to make new trees and by end of next year they will have good root system. I would wait for other suggestions from more experienced fig growers.


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RE: Tying down branches to root new figs?

  • Posted by tapla z5b-6a mid-MI (My Page) on
    Tue, Oct 11, 11 at 22:26

"...... has set roots on many branches."???? What does this mean?

The practice you're describing is called 'ground layering'. It's easy and virtually foolproof. I'll link you to something I didn't read, (but I looked at the pictures) :-) I don't know if it mentions this, but you'll get roots much faster if you remove the bark and expose cambial tissues on the lowest part of the layering - that would be directly under the brick on the underside of the branch you're layering.

See also 'stooling', which is also a near foolproof in-ground method of propagating multi-stemmed plants. If you're interested, I can give you a guide to how to employ stooling for figs & most other trees.

Al

Here is a link that might be useful: More on ground layering


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RE: Tying down branches to root new figs?

"...... has set roots on many branches."???? What does this mean?"

The bottom branches have touched the ground and rooted by themselves.

I know how to ground layer, I've done that with grapes and flowers. I'm just wondering if it would work over winter with a fig so that I can transplant in the spring or fall next year.

Thanks!


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RE: Tying down branches to root new figs?

  • Posted by tapla z5b-6a mid-MI (My Page) on
    Thu, Oct 13, 11 at 14:17

It probably will work if you mulch the area well where you want roots to occur, especially if leaves are still green & making food for the plant & you get right after it. New roots aren't as tolerant of cold as their older more lignified counterparts, so some protection to help ensure the viability of any newly formed roots would be very helpful.

Why not just use the already rooted branches you have & call it a day?

Al


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RE: Tying down branches to root new figs?

"Why not just use the already rooted branches you have & call it a day?"

See Above! ;) They are too big to dig up, plus I'm lazy! LOL

The root balls are so big I would need a backhoe!


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