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Cutting Back???

Posted by JessMonkie 8b GA (My Page) on
Mon, Nov 8, 04 at 22:25

OK, this is my first winter with my plants. I have an Angel's Earrings. What is the purpose of cutting back your plants over winter and how much and what should I cut back on this plant? Any info would be appreciated. Thanks.

Jess


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Cutting Back???

Hi Jess,
The main purpose of cutting back (if your fuchsia is growing in a pot), is
(a) it takes up less space over the winter period.
(b) it helps to get rid of any pests and diseases that may be lurking.
(c) it strengthens the plant and gives it a rest-period.
If you go to six threads underneath yours called 'Overwintering' and have a read there, I think it will answer all your questions, if not please come back.
If your plant is growing in the garden, and is large, you can trim it back to 18 inches now and wait until next Spring when new growth is coming out of the ground before removing all this year's growth - Kath:)


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RE: Cutting Back???

Hi Jess

As Kath says it depends on whether your plants are in pots or in the ground as to how you deal with them over winter.

If you let us know which we are dealing with it is easier to advise.

Tight ....


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RE: Cutting Back???

I have it in a pot about 12 inches in diameter. I'm a dumb American and don't know what that converts to in metric ;) It was about dead and started to come back to life. It didn't get much of a chance to grow back so I'm afraid to cut back any of it because there isn't much left of it.

I'm working on that "Overwintering" thread, Kath. Boy! It's like a book. I have a post in there myself. It seems to be a point of confusion for a lot of people.

Thanks for the info!!


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RE: Cutting Back???

Hi Jess

We can stick with the 12 inches - I never got around to changing anyway.

Now that we know that the plant is growing in a pot it is easier to provide information that will help you.

It is a good time to let the plant have a rest and also an opportunity to cut it back by about a third. The best way to do this is to reduce the watering and let the leaves fall naturally if possible.

When you cut back you want to leave a minimum of 3 nodes (this is where the leaves come from) and I like to seal the cuts using a dab of P.V.A. glue - this stops the sap 'bleeding' and possibly causing 'die back' of the stem.

Use a good pair of secatuers and make the cut as clean as possible and as close as possible without damaging the dormant buds in the node.

By leaving at least 3 nodes you have the insurance of the plant breaking from all or at least some of these dormant buds.

The plant can then be stored as described in the 'overwintering thread' and brought back into growth either after a few weeks rest or when the weather improves and the risk of any frost is gone.

Do let me know what you think of the link.

Tight.....

Here is a link that might be useful: A Beginners Guide


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RE: Cutting Back???

Thanks Tight.

So, I've already reduced watering and the leaves have been falling off. I'm lookin up the PVA glue 'cause I've never heard of that. What exactly do you mean "breaking from all or at least some of these dormant buds". This is all so confusing. I've been looking things up but I'm more of a visual person. Forgive my density.

Thanks,
Jess


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RE: Cutting Back???

Hi Jess

It really isnt so confusing, when you cut the plant back to above a node there are many dormant buds within that node which are ready to start back into growth when the conditions are right. You can see them in the photograph starting to break.


The conditions need to be right when the plants start back into growth though as these new shoots are very tender and if they are allowed to become frosted they will die.

Also when the plant is stored for the winter the conditions need to be on the cool side rather than on the warm side, particularly if the light level is poor.

With regards to the P.V.A glue any stationers should have some, it is what the school kids use.

Hope this visual helps a little....

Tight....


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RE: Cutting Back???

That is one heck of a great link. Thanks much for posting it. I'm just a beginner also as far as fuchsias go,( and not a expert in others), so your link, once again is great..


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RE: Cutting Back???

Yeah, it is a great link. I've tabbed it as a favorite. Good info in there. Thanks Tight.

Jess


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RE: Cutting Back???

Hi

For those who added the link as a favourite sorry but it changed and here is the new one.

Sorry for any inconvenience

Tight....

Here is a link that might be useful: Beginners Guide


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RE: Cutting Back???

The "Beginners Guide" is well worth reading, and it now has even more info added. And I don't think it is just for beginners.. I think I might even try showing in a year or two just because of his writing..


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