Return to the Fuchsia Forum | Post a Follow-Up

 o
A Small Fuchsia Present

Posted by tightathome Yorks - UK (My Page) on
Wed, Dec 22, 04 at 15:40

Hi All

A Christmas treat, I think that some of you might appreciate?

It is the display of Bonsai Fuchsias at the North East Counties Fuchsia Group Fuchsia Fantasia (Festival) on 4th and 5th September 2005 at Normanby Hall, Scunthorpe.


Tight....


Follow-Up Postings:

 o
RE: A Small Fuchsia Present

Very nice Tight,
Pink Rain is one of my favourites for bonsai work - Kath :)


 o
RE: A Small Fuchsia Present

Wow!
After enduring this monster blizzard over the weekend--our
snowpiles are 3 meters tall next to our driveway and street
and desperately wanting to see some colour other than white!!! I came across these beautiful treats!

Thanks so much for posting the pix.
Rose


 o
RE: A Small Fuchsia Present

To brighten another cold, snowy day. This is 'Loxhore Mazurka' 6 years old. Grown from a cutting. Measures 11 inches high from top of soil level.


 o
RE: A Small Fuchsia Present

Oh YES!! (I'm looking out from my office window onto a barren landscape of white on white.)
That bonsai fuchsia picture is another sight for sore eyes.
Pictures and memories are what keep us energized during
these long winter, non-outdoor-gardening months!
Thanks much.


 o
RE: A Small Fuchsia Present

Hi Rose

Just a little Triphylla photo to brighten up your ‘white out’ – this is a nice one called ‘Gottingen’

And remember ‘A Rose by any other name could be a Fuchsia’

Tight....


 o
RE: Another Fuchsia Present

Another one for you Rose

This photograph was taken at the British Fuchsia Society Autumn Show at Harrogate North Yorkshire in September last year. It was grown by Mal and Lesley Wilkinson and is of course ‘Firecracker’….

Tight....


 o
RE: A Small Fuchsia Present

This really works!--this living vicariously through those photos. Everybody should try it. It must be something
about the pinks and reds which give such a lift.
Question: Do all triphyllas have the clusters of long trumpets?
Woke up to -17 deg Centigrade this morning (nothing compared to what my daughter experiences up at college in Bangor, Maine (-34 deg C)--but still cold! Great to switch on the internet and get a jumpstart for the day.
Thanks Tight and Kath!


 o
RE: A Small Fuchsia Present

Rose, Question: Do all triphyllas have the clusters of long trumpets?

They all have clusters of tubular flowers Rose, the length of each can vary greatly acoording to the variety, approximately from half an inch to several inches - Kath:)


 o
RE: A Small Fuchsia Present

Hi Rose

Pleased that you liked the photograph, here is another that I took at the same show, this is ‘Adinda’.

I have added the link below so that you can see some of the diversity of the Triphylla types, from the really small ‘Timothy Titus’ to the long ‘Roos Breytenbach’ and all the others in between.

Hope you enjoy them

Tight....

Here is a link that might be useful: Some Triphyllas to look at


 o
RE: A Small Fuchsia Present

Absolutely!!
Every triphylla photo--I get closer and closer to pruning
my Gartenbonmeister--problem is that I just LOVE having
a tall tree-like structure (any triphyllas which can
be trained as standards???--and how long would that take?)

The link is also wonderful. Are all those triphyllas as
easy to grow as the Gartenbonmeister?

Thanks again.


 o
RE: A Small Fuchsia Present

Hi Rose

Once again I am pleased that you like the photo and the link.

Many of the Triphylla types are quite easy to grow in our climate, (not sure about yours) once again with the proviso that they are never allowed to get touched by frost. I personally grow about 7 or 8 different Triphylla types and I over winter them in a similar fashion to my other plants.

I have a couple of standards going at the moment which are only a couple of years old, in my opinion they are not at their best until they are at least 4 or 5 years and they have some girth to the stem. The one major problem with growing Triphylla as a standard is that they tend to want to flower on the leader and you then have to nip this out and allow the three new growths to develop from this stop. You then select the strongest growing new growth to use as the new ‘leader’ and remove the other two. The node where the growth came from will eventually blend into the stem. This process may need to be repeated a couple of time in the initial growing of the standard stem.

The head of a Triphylla standard is produced in much the same way as any other cultivar. The best I ever grew was a ‘full’ standard of ‘Thalia’ which was 6ft high by about 5ft across the head, the problem I had with this was transporting it to the many show that I used to exhibit at, even now when I get the new standards up and ready to show it is a logistical nightmare.

This is another photograph for you, it is of my good friend Mike Oxtoby’s Triphylla ‘Mary’, part of a display he put together at the North East Fuchsia Group Extravaganza held in September 2005.


If you want to see how Mike ‘trims’ his Triphylla take a look at the link below.

And we do this for FUN!!!!

Tight....

Here is a link that might be useful: Cutting back the 'oxo' way


 o
RE: A Small Fuchsia Present

Yes.
I can now bite the bullet and do the trimming.
Shall I wait until May when I put this outside for the
summer? Right now it is under a flourescent light in
the basement--not doing too much--very dry-leaves seem
to have a crimp in them.

Sometimes we have to be SHOWN the WAY!!
Thanks much.


 o
RE: A Small Fuchsia Present

You need to get as much new growth on the plant as low down as possible, I would suggest that you wait another couple of weeks and then depending on how big you want the plant to grow, cut it back to leave about 3 nodes on each branch. This should allow the plant to ‘break’ from any or all of the nodes. If on the other hand you want it to grow on long stems don’t cut it back as hard.

This is one of those occasions where you "pays your money and takes your choice".

It would be a good idea to keep putting the plant outside on any days that are nice and the temperature is reasonable, it doesn’t matter if it rains, this will help the new growths to break from stems. But be sure to bring it back indoors before it gets cold in the late afternoon.

Any new growth should be pinched back as early as possible as Triphylla need approximately 14 weeks to come into flowering from their last stop. I time mine for my first show of the year which is at the end of July and my ‘last stop’ will be in the middle of April to make sure they are flowering for then.

Some of this action may seem drastic to some and all I can say is that this plant….

Is now like this


And I am not worried in the least.

Tight....


 o Post a Follow-Up

Please Note: Only registered members are able to post messages to this forum.

    If you are a member, please log in.

    If you aren't yet a member, join now!


Return to the Fuchsia Forum

Information about Posting

  • You must be logged in to post a message. Once you are logged in, a posting window will appear at the bottom of the messages. If you are not a member, please register for an account.
  • Posting is a two-step process. Once you have composed your message, you will be taken to the preview page. You will then have a chance to review your post, make changes and upload photos.
  • After posting your message, you may need to refresh the forum page in order to see it.
  • Before posting copyrighted material, please read about Copyright and Fair Use.
  • We have a strict no-advertising policy!
  • If you would like to practice posting or uploading photos, please visit our Test forum.
  • If you need assistance, please Contact Us and we will be happy to help.


Learn more about in-text links on this page here