Return to the Georgia Gardener Forum | Post a Follow-Up

 o
lantana

Posted by graybird NE Ga. (My Page) on
Thu, Aug 19, 10 at 14:19

I had every intention of planting 20-25 Miss Huff Lantana plants this summer, but the heat became so intense that I had to postpone the plantings. What I am wondering about is what is the latest date that I could plant the Miss Huff and still have time for it to take sufficient root for it to make it thru the winter and emerge again next spring? It is mid August now and still to hot for me to prepare the planting site and plant. I live in Madison County just a little NE of Athens, Ga. Thanks, Ray


Follow-Up Postings:

 o
RE: lantana

Graybird, I think it should be fine. Maybe on a cool morning, you could get some of the holes ready and plant early in September. Fall is the best time to plant trees, shrubs, and perennials anyway!

Unless lantana has a specific requirement that I don't know about.

Maybe you could call your county extension office.....

Good luck!


 o
RE: lantana

"Miss Huff" is considered one of the hardiest lantanas and will usually act as a perennial in Zone 7b; however, I think you would be wise to start the plant outdoors in May rather than in September in order to give it sufficient time to develop a large network of roots. I doubt that starting "Miss Huff" in September will allow it sufficient time to establish itself well enough to survive even a warm Zone 7b winter, much less a colder than normal one. I would hate to have twenty-some-odd potted lantanas to take care of over the winter. But who knows? Maybe you'll be lucky, and the plants will sail through the winter if you do go ahead and plant them now. However, you shouldn't be surprised if they freeze because it's a little late in the year to plant a semi-hardy plant outdoors. I will say that I've had potted "Miss Huff" lantanas to survive a Zone 7b winter in black nursery pots exposed to the elements. However, this past winter a potted "Miss Huff" died from the cold.


 o
RE: lantana

"Miss Huff" is considered one of the hardiest lantanas and will usually act as a perennial in Zone 7b; however, I think you would be wise to start the plant outdoors in May rather than in September in order to give it sufficient time to develop a large network of roots. I doubt that starting "Miss Huff" in September will allow it sufficient time to establish itself well enough to survive even a warm Zone 7b winter, much less a colder than normal one. I would hate to have twenty-some-odd potted lantanas to take care of over the winter. But who knows? Maybe you'll be lucky, and the plants will sail through the winter if you do go ahead and plant them now. However, you shouldn't be surprised if they freeze because it's a little late in the year to plant a semi-hardy plant outdoors. I will say that I've had potted "Miss Huff" lantanas to survive a Zone 7b winter in black nursery pots exposed to the elements. However, this past winter a potted "Miss Huff" died from the cold.


 o Post a Follow-Up

Please Note: Only registered members are able to post messages to this forum.

    If you are a member, please log in.

    If you aren't yet a member, join now!


Return to the Georgia Gardener Forum

Information about Posting

  • You must be logged in to post a message. Once you are logged in, a posting window will appear at the bottom of the messages. If you are not a member, please register for an account.
  • Please review our Rules of Play before posting.
  • Posting is a two-step process. Once you have composed your message, you will be taken to the preview page. You will then have a chance to review your post, make changes and upload photos.
  • After posting your message, you may need to refresh the forum page in order to see it.
  • Before posting copyrighted material, please read about Copyright and Fair Use.
  • We have a strict no-advertising policy!
  • If you would like to practice posting or uploading photos, please visit our Test forum.
  • If you need assistance, please Contact Us and we will be happy to help.


Learn more about in-text links on this page here