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New old stock 1996 MIRRO

Posted by ajsmama 5b (NW CT) (My Page) on
Tue, Feb 25, 14 at 11:34

I know new ones not good. This new in boX. Ship date March 96. Made in USA any good? Sorry on phone


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: New old stock 1996 MIRRO

Sorry, I don't know the date of mine. I'm sure it was long before that.


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RE: New old stock 1996 MIRRO

  • Posted by digdirt 6b-7a North AR (My Page) on
    Tue, Feb 25, 14 at 13:21

The model number???

Dave


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RE: New old stock 1996 MIRRO

No model number on the box that I can see (don't want bar code?) but bottom has stamp M-0512-11 12 quarts. Lid with weight (5-10-15), installed gasket and rack still shrink-wrapped, looks brand new except box missing Styrofoam corners and 1 seam coming unglued.


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RE: New old stock 1996 MIRRO

I'm not sure what year mine is, but it's the same model number. I love it. I has the disk style machined weight that just drops on as opposed to my other Mirro with the weight that you have to screw on (while hot steam is escaping, of course...).

The M-0512-11 model fits 7 quart jars...just barely. You cannot stack pints, but probably can stack half-pints.

I like the fact that it's shorter, it's easier to get quarts out of it and not bump the back of my hand on the overhead hood.

How much is it? Personally, if it were $50 or less, I'd go for it. I like my Mirros! You can still buy parts at the link I included.

Deanna

Here is a link that might be useful: Mirro M-0512-11 parts


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RE: New old stock 1996 MIRRO

  • Posted by digdirt 6b-7a North AR (My Page) on
    Tue, Feb 25, 14 at 15:49

Agree with Deanna - the 0512 was/is a good model.

Dave


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RE: New old stock 1996 MIRRO

I figured if it was made in USA then it was old enough to be one of the good ones, aren't the problem ones made in China?

So do you think I need to order a gasket, overpressure plug, any other parts ASAP due to the age? Though as far as I can tell w/o taking it out of plastic, the gasket appears to still be flexible.

I did buy it before I left Goodwill ;-) it was only $15! It does say not recommended for smoothtop ranges, but it's 12" and flat bottomed, my large burner is 10" and the Presto does fine. Is the Mirro lighter-weight, would I have a problem with it melting onto the glass or any other reason I shouldn't use it?


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RE: New old stock 1996 MIRRO

Chances are that you will NOT need to buy anything. I agree, less than $50, buy it. I paid $70 for the taller one.

It might be a good idea for you to get another stove to can on. The oven doesn't have to work, just the top. I've got one that I need picked up just like that. It will cost the person too much to fix the oven, so he gave it to me.

Marla


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RE: New old stock 1996 MIRRO

  • Posted by digdirt 6b-7a North AR (My Page) on
    Tue, Feb 25, 14 at 18:08

12" and flat bottomed, my large burner is 10"

It is the raised bottoms (as in convex) or a flat bottom that is the same or smaller diameter than the burner that works best. Yours is 2" bigger than the burner so heat may be trapped and the burner will likely cycle off and on.

But then trying to pressure can on a glass top has so many problems that like Marla said, buying a separate coil burner or cooktop is best anyway rather than trying to force it to work.

Dave

This post was edited by digdirt on Tue, Feb 25, 14 at 18:10


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RE: New old stock 1996 MIRRO

Darn, I knew the graniteware BWBs with the recessed bands don't work. The Presto has a raised (looking from the outside) center, that works well, no problem maintaining pressure. I thought flat as long as it wasn't any larger than 2" (so 1" overhang) bigger than the burner was OK.

Guess I'm going to have to try it. If it seems to work (steady spin/hiss, you said this type doesn't really rock?) are there any parts I should get ASAP before they aren't available any longer?

Eventually I probably will build a canning kitchen - all the canning stuff and freezers are in the basement, might as well add another fridge and a stove too!


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RE: New old stock 1996 MIRRO

My hubby's grandparents did their canning in the basement. They had an extra stove, of course theirs was a wood stove, but it's a great idea.

Marla


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RE: New old stock 1996 MIRRO

  • Posted by digdirt 6b-7a North AR (My Page) on
    Tue, Feb 25, 14 at 21:56

A canning kitchen is a great thing to have but you sure don't need to go to all that trouble and expense just to have a separate burner for canning. You can buy all sorts of options from single burners to a used stove for little more than the cost of the pressure canner.

But there are never any guarantees for canning with anything on a glass top stove and no one can tell you without a doubt that yes it work with your stove. It works for some, it fails badly for others. So it is strictly an individual trial and error endeavor that remains a not-recommended/warranty violation for all the brands I have looked at.

Dave


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RE: New old stock 1996 MIRRO

My burners cycle even when there's nothing on them. DD was making chocolate pudding the other night, small burner on low, she heard it click and asked what that sound was, I told her the burners just do that.

Cycling hasn't been a problem with the Presto, of course the longest processing time I've done is pints of meat at 75 minutes but it held pressure.

So, do you think I should get a gasket for the Mirro ASAP (it does seem flexible when I squeeze it), or just to have handy? What about other parts. Returning it is not an option, Goodwill only takes back electrical and mechanical (well, maybe they'd count this as mechanical?) if they don't work (but I'm sure this will work fine, if not on my range then someone else's). My cousin has an old coil stove (she moved into her dad's house after he died), but she has absolutely NO counter space to prep anything.


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RE: New old stock 1996 MIRRO

If the gasket is flexible, then don't worry about it. I've only replaced the gasket 1x in over 15 years, and I didn't realize that I didn't need it then. Now I have an extra.

There shouldn't be any other parts, as long as the weights are there. the gasket and pressure relief 'plug' is the only thing that I can think of.

I did have to replace the pressure relief 'plug', only because I didn't check the tube and it got plugged. We couldn't find the old plug, and just bought a new one. My Ace Hardware always seems to have just what I need, but only 1-2 in stock.

We prep on fold up tables (Lifetime brand) that we use for the farmers market. We pop them up wherever we need them, from the kitchen to the park for parties. They are heavy plastic that clean well with bleach. Might be an idea for you. You can get 4', 6' and 8' ones. I would buy the fold in half, they don't look as sturdy.

Marla


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RE: New old stock 1996 MIRRO

I do have 2 tables I use a market, 1 6ft that's pretty sturdy and an 8ft that's not as heavy. So we'll see if she wants to can, I can always use the Mirro there (or give it to her). My great-aunt must have made all the meals using the kitchen table, my great uncle built the house in 1945 or so, put in about a foot of counter to right of sink, and another 5ft on top of cabinets built across from the stove, against the dining room wall, but I swear they're 18 or 21" deep, not 24". (He also put only 1 bathroom in the house - right off the kitchen, though 3 bedrooms upstairs - guess that was luxury since he grew up with no indoor plumbing - my grandparents put a bathroom into the old farmhouse about 1955 when great-grandpa couldn't walk that far any more.)


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RE: New old stock 1996 MIRRO

I would try the canner without any produce in it.
Just put the 2-3" of water in, twist the lid on and bring it up to pressure. You will know if the gasket is leaking or if it seals fine. Better to find out now if you need to order a new one than in the middle of harvest time!

It will also test the overpressure plug and tube. There shouldn't be any sigificant steam leaking anywhere. Mine sizzes a little near the plug, but it evaporates instantly.

Deanna


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RE: New old stock 1996 MIRRO

If the gasket starts to leak, depressurize it. take the gasket and wash it in warm/hot soapy water, stretching it as you wash it. then try again. I've never actually had a gasket go 'bad'. Even the ones that came originally with the old canners.

Marla


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RE: New old stock 1996 MIRRO

Deanna - what type of cooktop do you have?

Without a stopwatch, I can't tell, but my big burner cycles on and off every minute when on High, app. 30 secs on and 30 secs off, even when nothing on it. Takes a while to get anything boiling, but once it does (either Presto or copper-sandwiched bottom stainless pot) it keeps boiling, enough thermal mass to keep it going I guess. I've never used a thin-bottomed pan on this stove - and I wouldn't use a thin aluminum one.

I was just wondering if I should order parts now (and what parts typically need replacing besides gasket), if they're getting harder to find for the old models?

Maybe my cousin will remodel and give me her old stove - though I don't know if I want one *that* old. Craigslist had a couple for under $100 (still too much for me), 1 free (but that was a month ago). As far as glasstops, I found 1 Maytag model that has a 12" burner that says it can be used for canning, but it looks like it's been discontinued. Maybe someone will come out with something similar by the time I'm ready to replace my Kenmore?

Wish we had gas in the neighborhood - I'm just not ready for a big propane tank in the back yard. I should just look for a turkey fryer - though in that case, I could just buy a weight for my old AA!


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RE: New old stock 1996 MIRRO

  • Posted by digdirt 6b-7a North AR (My Page) on
    Wed, Feb 26, 14 at 13:00

I was just wondering if I should order parts now (and what parts typically need replacing besides gasket), if they're getting harder to find for the old models?

I think that question has been answered. First, your model isn't that old. Many of us are using models more than 50 years old and those are the ones that it is getting hard to find parts for, IF any parts are ever needed.

Second, no parts "typically" require replacing. That is one thing that is so mis-leading about the AA advertising to justify their cost. They imply you have to replace Presto and Mirro gaskets every few years when you don't. It depends on how the PC is stored and maintained and properly used. Again, many have never had to replace anything on either the old Prestos or Mirros.

Third, if you buy replacement parts now and then store them for the however many years before you need them then, if you can even find them, they likely won't be any good anyway as they will have aged too. The worst that can happen is that in 30 years you might have to buy a new canner. So it is a moot point.

Look in the classifieds in your local newspaper as there are always used stoves and cooktops listed for sale. The Sears Outlet here regularly has refurbished electric coil-type cook tops for sale for $125. You can buy a great propane burner/cooker for less than $50 and can all summer on one small tank of gas, and an electric countertop single burner for not much more. We have discussed these here repeatedly including links and pics of the various burners that are used.

Trying to cook, blanch, and much less can on a burner that cycles off and on every 30 sec. or so would be a major pain in the a** and simply makes no sense to me. Yes, I know some claim they can do it and maybe they can since all the brands don't cycle their burners. But that still doesn't make it something that should be done.

It would affect the processing and prep times and lead to pressure fluctuations inside the canner even if you can't see the difference on the gauge. That means increased likelyhood of siphoning.

Several brands of stoves (GE, Whirlpool, Maytag, etc.) are coming out with 12" "Power Cooker" burners on glasstop stoves expressly made for canning and heavy duty cooking but they are also putting a very high price tag on them.

Dave


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RE: New old stock 1996 MIRRO

Thanks - I thought Marla was just lucky, that some people have to replace gaskets every 5 years or so. I didn't know how old the models that the parts were getting scarce for were - 18 years is pretty old to me! The link Deanna gave did say that the lift pin assembly was out of stock and they didn't know if/when trhey'd get it in.

I did look online for heavy-duty electric portable elements, saw some discussions here (I'm familiar with the propane camp stove recommendations), but haven't found a nice big powerful electric one. Was there one that someone here found to work? I do recall some discussions of induction, but obviously that won't work with the aluminum PCs.

A second stove or cooktop would have to go in a canning kitchen, so I was looking for a replacement for my kitchen stove or a portable unit first. As I said, I'll probably eventually set up a separate kitchen - I've already got tables, and DH had asked about getting another fridge for harvest time (I suppose in the off-season it will hold beer!) so all it will take is some wiring and a new (to me) stove.

Now I know why I was having trouble with the Presto siphoning, though the gauge appeared to be holding pretty steady as I recall (and the weight kept wobbling). Do you think everything (meat chunks and tomatoes with squash, plain tomatoes) is OK as long as I boil it 10 minutes first? We've actually eaten some of the tomatoes, though none of the meat.


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RE: New old stock 1996 MIRRO

You can also check with repair people. some of the stoves just aren't worth fixing.

The Amish will use a 20# cylinder, if they need to use a stove out of their normal cooking area.

Dave's right, don't worry about getting a new gasket, these pans have been around forever and will continue to be. so the few parts will still be around. If you can't find it near you, we Midwesterners will probably be able to walk right in the store and get them for you.

Canning is coming back, I was even asked to start a growing/canning facebook group. I'm not attempting to be the expert, just helping newbies NOT to be afraid of trying.

Marla


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RE: New old stock 1996 MIRRO

I have a (cheap) electric coil stove. I finally bought a propane 2-burner cookstove for outdoors, but it's really only been used to can tuna, and not even by me!! My Master Food Preserver group teaches classes and they used my stove last fall since I was unable to attend that one.

I agree about parts. I wouldn't buy them until you need them. I probably used the original gasket for 20+ years and have found that when I first dig it out in the spring, I need to wash in warm water to soften a bit and sometimes coat with a VERY, VERY thin coat of oil. But, usually that isn't necessary.

Deanna


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RE: New old stock 1996 MIRRO

  • Posted by digdirt 6b-7a North AR (My Page) on
    Thu, Feb 27, 14 at 11:47

You said you don't have natural gas available but why are you ruling out a propane burner?

I will point out that millions of folks cook with propane and that using any propane burner does not mean it must be used outdoors only. Propane burners can be used indoors just like electric ones. Sure the tank is outside so you might need to run the line through a window or such but for most of the canning season that is no problem.

Do you think everything (meat chunks and tomatoes with squash, plain tomatoes) is OK as long as I boil it 10 minutes first?

There has never been any food safety issue mentioned with siphoning as long as the pressure doesn't fall below the required level and the lids seal. Siphoning is primarily a quality issue because of the exposed food and the air left in the jar.

Dave


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RE: New old stock 1996 MIRRO

Thanks Dave, I wasn't sure if the siphoning (since we did rule out other causes) was a sign that the pressure had dropped too much, or too often (though I didn't see it fluctuate more than 1/2 lb at most, and still above 10 psi, though I know the gauge isn't likely spot on, it did read 10.75 on High with 10 lb weight), and didn't know if the fast cycling of the burner might mean it was underprocessed (since the burner is off approx. half the time on High, and may be longer at lower settings). The Mirro might be a problem since it doesn't have a gauge as a visual check to make sure it's maintaining pressure.

I'm not opposed to a small propane burner or camp stove, we have a propane grill. I just went with an electric stove (though I would have preferred gas) when we built since NG isn't available, and I didn't want a 6ft tall propane tank right outside the kitchen.

Cooking question now - since I have the Mirro, and would like to check operation on my stove (yes, I know I can process water, but I've got an emergency stock already), I figured I'd use it to cook meat or beans for a short time before trying longer PCing times. DH remembers his mom always cooked beans in the PC.

I don't want to cook directly in the aluminum, what is a good vessel to put inside? Corningware or Pyrex (no cracks - but do scratches matter like they do in canning jars)? Enameled cast iron (3 qt)? Does it make a difference if vessel is covered or open (so far as beans, etc., thinking of popping/mess, don't want to have to scrub the Mirro)? Manual just assumes you're cooking directly in the PC.

Thanks Deanna and Marla for your advice/answers as well.


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RE: New old stock 1996 MIRRO

  • Posted by digdirt 6b-7a North AR (My Page) on
    Thu, Feb 27, 14 at 13:11

Manual just assumes you're cooking directly in the PC.

Yes it does since that is what you are supposed to. It is also what most do. Adding another vessel inside can only interfere with the cooking process and the time required to achieve optimal results.

I can't help you with a vessel for inside other than what Google has to offer on that subject as that is a relatively new concept some buy into because of the claims of aluminum supposedly contaminating of the food. I cook in the PC itself and always have.

But Google search is bound to pull up sites that do it and explain how you adjust the times and methods accordingly.

Dave

PS: a 6' tall propane tank??? Never seen any such thing. Or do you mean one of the 1000 lb. 6' long tanks that are set far off from the house? What kind of propane tanks do you all have back there in the east? They come in all sorts of sizes but most all are low to the ground. All you need for a burner is a regular 20 lb. grill tank that is maybe 18" tall max.


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RE: New old stock 1996 MIRRO

I found Miss Vickie's website and have been looking at that. I've never cooked in aluminum pots, and can't see cooking a pound (or less) of beans in a 12-qt PC and then trying to get them out, so figured it would be best to use a smaller pot inside. Looks like SS is the preferred vessel.

People who have propane heat have the long horizontal tanks, but people who just use it for cooking and hot water (which doesn't make sense to me, if you have hot water might as well heat with it too) have a tank or 2 that look like the one on the far right in this picture:

Here is a link that might be useful: Propane tanks


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RE: New old stock 1996 MIRRO

When I had propane, I started off with a 1,000 gal tank and it did seem huge. I chose that size since we lived so far off the road and didn't want to run out of propane since we heated and cooked with it.

later I changed it out for a 500 gal, and it was much much smaller. We found that we were only using about 375 gal per year and the 1,000 tank wasn't be filled each year, so the propane company wanted to charge us a fee each year due to that.

Some 200 gallon/100 gallon tanks are about 6' tall. Hubby used them in the construction industry since they could transport them to the job site.

Sheila, you can cook directly in the canner. I don't that nobody recommends cooking in aluminum, but for years we did. Only recently did people realized that aluminum cookware was linked to problems. One time, and not a high acid, I would think, wouldn't hurt anyone.

Personally, I'd cook a huge roast. Then freeze the left overs. It's great not to have to cook a good roast, taking forever, on nights without alot of time to cook. I usually cook several roasts at a time, and freeze them already cooked. Just warm up later, and done.


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RE: New old stock 1996 MIRRO

Decided to test it out empty, with 2 quarts of water. Took 20 min to boil, then 10 min venting, got to 5 psi right away (2 min), I kept adjusting burner to see when it would stop jiggling - it seemed to slow to 3-4 jiggles/min at setting 4, but it was more like 3 jiggles in 30secs and then 1 more after a 15-20 sec wait (as burner must have shut off) so I figured I have to keep it at 5 (Medium) to keep jiggling with no more than 12 sec stop.

Took the weight off, turned back to High, put 10lbs on, started jiggling in a couple of minutes again, turned to 6 and it's jiggling furiously still. Before I turn it down, I was wondering if in order to prevent siphoning, it's better to keep it going constantly, or let it jiggle more during the first 30 secs than the last, as long as it doesn't go more than 20 secs without moving.

I know it's not ideal, but this is what my stove does. The Presto seemed to have the weight wobble more constantly, I never turned it down so low it would really stop moving.

Tur


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RE: New old stock 1996 MIRRO

OK, tried it on 15psi, was able to turn it down to 4 and keep it jiggling but it was more like 5 secs jiggle, 3-5 secs stop, 5 secs, 7 secs off, 2-3 secs, 10 secs off, 3-5secs jiggle, 5 secs off, 5-7secs jiggle, 3 secs off....

So what's the ideal on/off cycle? It's not jiggle-jiggle for a couple of secs, off for 10-13secs, jiggle-jiggle -off 12secs, etc. is it? But I'm sure it's not j-j-j-j-j-j (7-10secs), off 5 secs, j10secs, off 7 secs, j5 secs, off 15 secs, j3secs, off 20 secs, j5secs, off 10secs....


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RE: New old stock 1996 MIRRO

  • Posted by digdirt 6b-7a North AR (My Page) on
    Fri, Feb 28, 14 at 16:26

There is no "ideal". Even with a stove that doesn't cycle off and on. In theory it would be 5 sec. on 10 sec. off every 15 sec. so 4 times per min. In actual practice it is very different and with cycling burners will be even more irregular.

Prestos are machined to steadily jiggle/rock when at pressure. All you have to worry about is if it gets wildly rattling like crazy. No counting required. One big advantage of them over Mirro.

Mirros are machined to jiggle-spin-rock 3-4 times per minute when at pressure. It should never be less than 3-4 in a min., especially with your stove. Does that mean it can't move 5-8 times or even 10 times per min.? Not at all. 3-4 per min. is the minimum required. Beyond that number, unless it is doing it continuously, don't worry about it.

Dave


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RE: New old stock 1996 MIRRO

So OK if it's jiggling 5s, then off for 5-7 secs, on again, 3-4 times in 30secs, then only once more the next 30sec (when burner must be off), or is it best to keep it going faster (almost continuous, though not hissing like mad) during the first part of the cycle so that it jiggles at least twice in 30secs? Thanks - agree Presto is easier, but since it's long past the time I could return the 23qt, the 12qt Mirro was a better deal than buying a 16qt Presto. I'll use the 23qt when I have to doublestack pints, or BWB quarts, but try to use the Mirro for smaller batches.

Oh, Marla, as far as roast, I like to slow roast at 200, for 240 or 250 it would take nearly as long (hours), I don't want to have the oversized pan on my burner that long. I do have to try it in the Nesco next time instead of running the oven.


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RE: New old stock 1996 MIRRO

  • Posted by digdirt 6b-7a North AR (My Page) on
    Fri, Feb 28, 14 at 17:38

I don't know that it is possible to regulate it and prevent the pressure from falling off when your burner is cycling that much and for so long. Even if you got it going 6 times in 30 sec. that doesn't mean the pressure won't still be falling off in the next 30 sec and it could fall below 10 lbs.. Doesn't take long to go from 10 lb. down to 9 lb and void the processing.

If it were me I wouldn't do any pressure canning on that stove. Can't trust the results. Only other choice is to use the 15 lb weight instead of using your normal 10 lb and shoot for 4-5 times a min. That way at least you'd know it would be safe food. The pressure can't fall from 15 lb to below 10 lb in 30 sec.

Sure it is somewhat over-processing and you are going to have consistent siphoning problems but with that stove you don't really have a choice. It's that or no pressure canning.

Dave


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RE: New old stock 1996 MIRRO

If you get a really tough piece of meat, try to pressure cook it, It will tenderize much faster than cooking slowly in the oven. It does NOT brown tho. My grandmother used to pressure cook, then bake to get the browning. Her teeth weren't too good, so everything had to be really tender, falling apart tender.

I agree with Dave, your stove is not ideal for pressure canning. If I did try to pressure can on it, I would get it to jiggle a bit more, but not a really fast jiggle.

could you find a coil hot plate? or do they even make them anymore?

Marla


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RE: New old stock 1996 MIRRO

OK, so maybe just use the Mirro for cooking on this stove, and the Presto for canning since I can keep the weight wobbling on that?

I do have a (solid element) burner but it's only 1000W or so, and 7" so I don't think it would work for canning. I haven't seen a more powerful non-induction type.

Maybe this summer I'll try the Mirro on the grill's side burner (if not too heavy, and not too many BTU) before I decide on buying a propane burner.


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RE: New old stock 1996 MIRRO

Just a couple of examples of the many available:

Broil King 1500 watt electric burner

Cadco High Power 1500 wattt burner


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RE: New old stock 1996 MIRRO

If you want to use it on a BBQ grill side burner (I'm assuming that's what you are talking about), make sure you're not in a breeze/draft. Otherwise it will take forever to heat up and maintaining is hard. I used to can outside on BBQ grill and on open fire (BWB only).


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RE: New old stock 1996 MIRRO

Dave, I am again amazed at your search skills. I don't know if you looked for a certain wattage (is 1500 enough for PCing? 1300? But not 1000?), but when I looked the other day for portable electric burners I was coming up with induction (even when I included -induction in search terms), double, lots of stuff 1000W and under. Of course I didn't know what power I was looking for so ended up with a lot of stuff to sort through.

What diameter is minimum necessary for a 12" PC? Especially with a single burner vs a cooktop, I am worried not only about heating, but stability. Is a 7-8" burner in a 1sf housing large enough?

I did find a double propane burner with legs on CL, have to look at them new, but $150 seems a lot used. I'd use it in the garage out of the wind.

http://hartford.craigslist.org/app/4351336074.html


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RE: New old stock 1996 MIRRO

All of these burners have been discussed and recommend here several times in the past. The search pulls up all sorts of discussions about them. That also includes propane burners for far less than any $150, even doubles. Northern Tool has an excellent tabletop 2 burner propane for half that price.

amazon has lots of countertop electric burners so do most all the small appliance stores..

And yes 1500 watts is fine or so others report who use them. I wouldn't use one as I find propane much superior as i have said before. So is 1000 or anything in between but it will take much longer to come up to boil. 8-9" burners are standard for coil electric stoves and PC work just fine on them.

Either way it has to be 10x better than what you are currently working with.

Dave

The side burner on your grill is not intended for that much weight. Use the grill itself as most do or you will have to brace support the side burner somehow.


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RE: New old stock 1996 MIRRO

I wouldn't put the 23 qt canner on the side burner, or the AA, but thought the Mirro might work. But cooking directly on the grate might be possible - I have to see if there's room as I believe the grill I bought for DH a few years ago has an upper rack which swings up with the lid, but may not be far enough out of the way for a PC.

1000W would be OK for PCing? Will it come to pressure in a short enough time (and what should that be?)? I might have the solution in my basement already! As long as the overhang isn't a problem - I would set it on a tempered glass "countertop saver" I use under all my heat-producing small appliances (other than toaster that is), but the solid burner is just the size of the burner - no housing to speak of around it, just a thin plastic housing (which could be a problem from reflected heat from 12" pot).


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RE: New old stock 1996 MIRRO

Any wattage that will bring your PC up to temp will work. If it will bring it up, it should maintain it, providing you don't have a good draft.

What I use outside is a 'turkey fryer' unit. I use the big pot for cider making, and use the bottom heating unit for PC or BWB, either. It's cast iron looking (heavy) with a propane burner in the middle. The PC/BWB will set on the cast iron parts and work just fine, again not in a breezy area. My turkey fryers (I have 2) are only about 12" square and stand about 16-20" tall.

Marla


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RE: New old stock 1996 MIRRO

has an upper rack which swings up with the lid, but may not be far enough out of the way for a PC.

Those upper racks pop right off - easy removal and re-attachment. You can set pans right on the grill to cook. If it has multiple burners you only need to use one side or the other.

Dave


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RE: New old stock 1996 MIRRO

Yep, Dave's right, I used a charcoal BBQ one year, before I had my stove.


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RE: New old stock 1996 MIRRO

DH said No to adding a circuit and putting an old stove in the basement, so it's the grill or a turkey fryer like Marla has for now. But I told him when it was time to replace the Kenmore, I wanted to look for one with a canning element.


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RE: New old stock 1996 MIRRO

I checked around when I bought my new stove (we went from propane to electric) and decided against a smooth ceramic top. They look so easy to clean, but if I can't can, I can't have it. I'll be canning til they put in the ground, maybe after if I can figure that out. LOL!


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RE: New old stock 1996 MIRRO

I had no idea 7 years ago when I was researching best appliances for new house that I'd be canning, or what that would require. But now, even if we moved, the kids were out of the house and I didn't have a large enough garden to can, I'd still be doing my own jams, salsa, and pickles, and who knows maybe still PCing (once I really get the hang of it - still have to can some chicken and beef broth, some clams in clam broth so we can make chowder, etc.).


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RE: New old stock 1996 MIRRO

You will, just not as much. Remember we are just a family of 2 now, but with the kids' family, we can say a total of 12 if count everyone.


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