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New to canning, questions

Posted by growinidaho 5 (My Page) on
Thu, Jul 8, 10 at 21:37

I am new to canning this yr. Second yr for gardening. I have the 16 qrt Presto. Thanks for everyones posts, I have learned sooo much already!!
I may have lots of questions this season. The only thing I know how to make is freezer jam and uncanned pickled beets.

1. Is there a guide that tells me how many pounds are in how many cups. I don't have a food scale. For instance how many beets for a batch of pints or quarts. I know some recipes tell but I guide would be nice.

2. Do you measure by weight before or after cooking them, like the beets.

3. How do you know what fruit or veggie to tightly pack or loosely pack.

This list is what I plan to can:
Annies salsa
tomatoes
pickled beets
beets
dill pickles
sweet pickles
jalapenos
berry jam

maybes:
peaches
tomato sauce
tomato soup
pears

My beets will be ready in a week or 2. Pickling cukes don't have tendrils yet. The salsa veggies won't be ready until August. I am trying to watch videos to pick up tips and read all I can. I am slowly learning about high/low acid foods, safety precautions, storing, how to follow recipes exactly, etc. Any informational links would be great!
Thanks in advance for your replies!!!


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: New to canning, questions

Dear Grow in Idaho (it'd be nice to know your first name, too!), Congratulations on planning to take the leap.

First: Purchase yourself the most recent Ball Blue Book on Canning (Walmart, some produce markets, sold many places -- under $8) for a wealth of information. Great photos.

Second: While you have a Pressure Cooker, I don't know if it's a Pressure Canner (check the BBB for info on that).

Third: Get yourself a nice Boiling Water Bath ... and a scale. The scales are very handy, especially when you're not good at judging. If you're purchasing your produce it might be very helpful, so you really know how much to purchase.

And lastly: Check out the website for the National Center for Home Food Preservation below. It's a wealth of trustworth information.

In the beginning, especially, only trust recipes from those two sources or ones that have been approved of on this forum. Don't use Grandma's or a neighbor's old family recipes, no matter how good they say they are. Learn the fundamentals first.

Looking forward to hearing about your successes.

Kathy in Washington

Here is a link that might be useful: NCHFP website


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RE: New to canning, questions

Hi and welcome! If you aren't familiar with NCHFP, the recognized authority on home food processing, I'd suggest you start there. Linked it below. It and approved texts such as the Ball Blue Book will answer most basic questions and provide a wealth of info and recipes. The BBB is inexpensive and sort of the 'canner's bible' if you will so I strongly recommend you pick up a copy of the latest edition.

Please be aware that there are all sorts of incorrect, misleading, and down right dangerous recipes, videos, old cookbook, and canning instructions out there on the web. So it is best to stick with only approved sources and current texts until you gain experience.

Most all of the items on your list with a couple of exceptions can be safely canned using only a BWB. Do you plan to get into pressure canning too?

There are a number of conversion charts available. Here is one I use. When to weigh/measure - before or after - should be indicated in the recipe. Usually one does it before cooking as cooking is the final step before filling the jars, but there are exceptions.

And loose or tight packing is also usually indicated in the recipe. Off hand I can't think of anything that requires tight packing except for some meats. But if the recipe doesn't say then loose packing is always safer than tight. Tight packing unless specified in the recipe changes the density of the jar, changing the density slows the penetration of the heat, and that may invalidate the recommended processing time.

So a good place to start learning the Dos and Dont's is at NCHFP - just look up each of the foods you are interested in and if you have any questions, don't hesitate to ask.

Dave

Here is a link that might be useful: NCHFP


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RE: Kathy beat me!

Kathy types faster. ;)


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RE: But Dave gardens better than I do!

I just got here first because I'm at the computer while my husband's watching an old B&W WWII movie on TV!


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RE: New to canning, questions

You guys are fast!
I have the latest copy of the Ball Blue Book. I have checked out the NCHFP a little. I have the pressure canner and plan to pressure can and BWB. I am aware of how not to use just anyones recipes. I want to can safely. I am watching videos and reading just to get familiar with the order of doing things and getting tips. I saw you can keep jars hot in the oven, in the dish washer, in a pan of hot water or in a sink of hot water. I assume the pan of hot water is safest.
Thanks for your info and the links!
And is it a good idea to can some jars of water for practice the first time?


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RE: New to canning, questions

And is it a good idea to can some jars of water for practice the first time?

Yes it is a good way to learn how to manage your PC. Put some food coloring in the water so you can see if you are getting any siphoning while learning to balance the heat.

What model and size of PC do you have? Does it have the 3 weight - 5-10-15 part? If not you'll likely want to get one.

Dave


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RE: New to canning, questions

Thanks Dave, I will try the food coloring idea. Pressure canner is a 16 qrt Presto with 5-10-15 weight. Has a recipe and instruction booklet in the box.
I am excited to can my first batch of water...lol! And pickled beets. My MIL asked me what I wanted for a Christmas present one yr and I said pickled beets. She gave me a whole case! I made them last all yr. YUM!

Sherri


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RE: New to canning, questions

Just keep in mind that the Presto manual is fine for learning about the canner but shouldn't be used for canning times and procedures. The manuals are almost never updated and often include out-of-date recommendations.

The NCHFP has a good instruction page on operating pressure canners. Note the 10-minute venting time and the 10-minute wait time before removing product. Make notes in your manual to correct any misinformation.

Carol

Here is a link that might be useful: NCHFP Pressure Canner Instructions


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RE: New to canning, questions

Thank you Carol!


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RE: New to canning, questions

Just jumping in to say "Welcome" to our little addiction..............Shhhhhh!

You've gotten great advice and it's nice to hear someone wanting to learn safe ways to can!

Your local extension office is a wealth of information too.
They may offer some classes and they're usually very, very reasonable (to the point that ours is closing as they can no longer sustain themselves...Very, very SAD!).

Relax, read, have fun!
And post photos!!

Deanna


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RE: New to canning, questions

Thank you Deanna!
I am addicted before starting...lol.
Do beets and cucumbers grow faster if you don't watch them, like a pot of boiling water :)

Our local extension office is over an hour away :(
I don't know how to post pictures nor do I have a digital camera. I am behind on technology. I learned how to garden last yr by reading on here. And now canning!

Sherri


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RE: New to canning, questions

:)
I can relate! I'm a little slow on the technology thing too. Only in the last year or two have I learned to post pictures.

I think my extension office will be about 45 minutes away once our local one closes down. But....that will be the actual college town (Corvallis, OR), so not all bad!
Try looking up Idaho Extension and see what they've got online. Oregon has tons of recipes, etc. OR State is an agriculture college and does lots of testing of food, etc.
My daughter was actually trained as a chip tester (potato chips) as a part time job while she attended college. They had a panel that did comparisons for potato chip companies and provided a feedback/opinion report.
They do public, blind testing of many products. Pretty cool.

Anyway, your state extension may have a website or online classes available.

And our very own LindaLou is trained through Washington State Master Food Preservers. I'm pretty sure KatieC is a Master Food Preserver in Idaho.

Plus the many, many helpful folks on this forum with tons of experience, advice and tips!
Yes, you, Carol, Dave, and others (don't shoot me, I'm brain dead on a Friday night).

I've been canning for 25+ years and still learn something new every single year!

Deanna


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RE: New to canning, questions

Well, I did it! A litle nervous. I canned a pint and a quart of colered WATER! (at the same time)
Questions:
1. Can you can both sizes of jars at the same time? I know there are different times for different sizes of jars. But
what if you have a pint left over from canning quarts...do you have to can it by itself? I know you can just eat it up.

2. I am at about 3100' elevation. I need to increase the pounds of pressure or for water bath, the time. Correct?

3. Where is a good/cheap place to buy a food scale? Which is better digital/nondigital? I have used both at work.

4. We have a crap apple tree. BBB has a recipe for crab apple jelly. Do I just run the crab apples through my juicer I never use?

5. Do I treat huckleberries or elderberries the same as "berries" for making jam or jelly? BBB recipe for berry jam.

I am trying to plan ahead, the berries will be ripe in about 2 weeks and I need to get more jars and lids. Store is an hour away :(

I learned alot with this practice round. Thanks everyone for ALL your help!!! Thanks for helping me with all my questions!!

Sherri


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RE: New to canning, questions

1. Can you can both sizes of jars at the same time? I know there are different times for different sizes of jars. But
what if you have a pint left over from canning quarts...do you have to can it by itself? I know you can just eat it up.

You can mix jar sizes in the canner if you must but you have to use the time for the larger jars so many times the food in the small jar will be over-processed.

2. I am at about 3100' elevation. I need to increase the pounds of pressure or for water bath, the time. Correct?

Definitely. Instructions for both times and pressures will be given on most all approved recipes and if not the chart is readily available at NCHFP and in the BBB.

3. Where is a good/cheap place to buy a food scale? Which is better digital/nondigital? I have used both at work.

Honestly, that is up to you. Just Google them for a long list of sources and price comparisons.

4. We have a crap apple tree. BBB has a recipe for crab apple jelly. Do I just run the crab apples through my juicer I never use?

Not if it is jelly you want. Jelly is made from strained pre-cooked pulp. The recipe gives instruction on how to pre-cook the crab apples and then you strain the mash through a jelly bag. See the Crabapple Jelly instructions at NCHFP if necessary. NCHFP also covers all the basics of jelly making in the General Instructions section.

5. Do I treat huckleberries or elderberries the same as "berries" for making jam or jelly? BBB recipe for berry jam

Yes. All blackberries, blueberries, currants, dewberries, elderberries, gooseberries, huckleberries, loganberries, mulberries, raspberries are treated the same. See Berry Jam Instructions

I am trying to plan ahead, the berries will be ripe in about 2 weeks

Then you have plenty of time to explore all the info on all the basics at NCHFP. ;)

Dave


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RE: New to canning, questions

Thank you Dave, for answering my many questions!!!


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RE: New to canning, questions

Sherri, you could probably do with just an easy-to-use, not-too-big kitchen scale like the one I have on the link from Amazon.com. I use it, and it's fine. I rarely need to weigh more than four pounds at a time, but if I do I can weigh things a bit at a time. Anyhow, this works for me, and it gets good reviews.

You can probably find a couple of other items from Amazon.com that could bring your total to $25 and you could get free shipping.

A couple of items I find essential to canning convenience and ease are: A Jar Lifter (which I use, but always with my other hand and a potholder underneath the jar); a nice Funnel with a wide opening to fit on top of your jars when filling with jams, hot fruit, or whatever; A good Ladle to scoop up jams, etc., to fill jars; and, lastly, LOTS of potholders, teatowels, and dishcloths that you don't mind getting stained -- and maybe a special heavy duty apron just for canning and jamming!

Kathy in Washington

Here is a link that might be useful: Terraillon 4-Pound Add and Weigh Kitchen Scale


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RE: New to canning, questions

For value I really like the MyWeigh scales. I have an older 7001DX. It weighs up to 15 lbs., which I find important for canning, will tare and hold in grams, kilograms, ounces or pounds.

You can see its features at the link and read reviews. For under $35.00 I think it's a great buy.

Carol

Here is a link that might be useful: MyWeigh Scales


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RE: New to canning, questions

I say go with a digital scale. I love mine. Got one for my daughter, too. It is a Salter and goes up to about 11 lb. I think. Got them at Bed Bath and Beyond with a coupon.
It is so nice. Stainless steel. Mine is a bit different than the link, but similar in style.

Here is a link that might be useful: Salter scales.


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RE: New to canning, questions

You gals are the best! Now I have to decide...hmm. I wanted a nondigital but now that you pointed out that the digital weighs in grams, ounces, and so on, I think that it would be useful for other things besides "canning and jamming".

I bought a jar lifter kit last fall. All I could afford at the time. Had to save up for the canner I bought for Christmas. Thanks for the tip about holding the potholder underneath the jar. I love to crochet pot holders and dish rags so I have plenty of those. I have lots of old hand towels I never use. I hate to throw things away. Last fall I even picked up the crab apples to throw in my compost pile. Used to give them to the horses. The fall deer love them. I am getting more jars, lids, rings, spices, canning ingredients, etc. next week...YAY! You should see my list!

What about a food mill, I don't even know what they look like. My grandmothers canned but I was too little to learn. My mom hates cooking so canning skipped a generation. I always wanted to learn but didn't have time or anyone to show me. So now you guys are teaching me.
THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU!!!
Sherri


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RE: New to canning, questions

Scales - Scales - Scales! Three ladies who can and three quite different favorite scales. Isn't it interesting how there's no ONE WAY to do things?

And I'm sure others will chime in with their suggestions, too!

Anyhow, Sherri, you'll figure out your own favorites, and nobody will be able to tell you otherwise ... just like us. Continue to have fun with this hobby, activity, necessity, joy, and extremely satisfying chore called canning.

Kathy in Washington


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RE: New to canning, questions

I use mine for baking too and like the gram feature for that (especially European cookbooks).

I've had a Salter and another scale of similar design to the Teraillon, except that it weighed up to 11 pounds. But the MyWeigh is more accurate than either one and measures down to single grams, which is important in baking.

For the big jobs I also have a Detecto mechanical produce scale that weighs up to 100 lbs. We used to use it when the family operated a market garden.

There are all kinds of food mills, including some which are mixer attachments. The new Viking mixer has an automated colander and the old KitchenAid (made by Hobart) had one of the same design. Newer mixers also have fruit and vegetable strainers that operate off the head.

There are stand-alone hand-operated food mills as well as motorized ones.

But if money's tight, you can get by without it for a while. You can make applesauce and cook it without a food mill. The applesauce may be slightly chunky, but a lot of people prefer it that way. The same is true of tomato sauce. So while a food mill is handy, it's not essential.

When/If you are ready to consider one, come back with a new set of questions! It's good to do some canning first so that you can better assess your needs.

Carol


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RE: New to canning, questions

I don't even use a food mill. I put everything through my Cuisinart to puree. If I was wanting to remove seeds then I would. I got a great deal on a small one at a church yard sale, so I do own one. Just a small French hand crank stainless one.


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RE: New to canning, questions

Sherri,

A big welcome from Canada to the forum and to canning!

It sounds like you're having fun so far and you've only canned water! Imagine having actual FOOD in those jars! ;-)

In fact, you are ahead of me already because I don't pressure can---I can do most of what interests me in a water bath, though I may try a PC some day.

I don't have a recommendation on the scale (and you have several different recommendations on that already---like Kathy, I do enjoy the wide range of opinion here!). But I do recommend a food mill if your berry jam adventures will include raspberries or blackberries or anything else very seedy. It's also a time-save for tomato sauce, because it saves you having to peel & core each tomato--you cook them a little, then put them through the mill, which removes all the skins and any tough bits of core and most of the seeds.

Some people swear by the Victorio style, where you put the food in a "hopper" up top and crank vertically, like a clock face. Food goes through a spiral-type mill and comes out the spout into your bowl or pot.

http://www.amazon.com/Palmer-Wholesale-250-Victorio-Vegetable/dp/B001I7FP54/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=home-garden&qid=1278872837&sr=1-1-spell

Others, like me, like a Foley style, which you put right over the bowl or pot and crank horizontally like a roulette wheel. This one isn't exactly like mine but is the same idea:

http://www.amazon.com/RSVP-Endurance-Stainless-Steel-Food/dp/B0000CFH1K/ref=pd_sbs_k_2

Either way, unless you live in a major centre with good shopping opporutnities, Amazon.com is probably a good bet, like for a scale.

But you know what? You don't NEED to buy anything else to start canning! You've got jars, instructions, and IMHO the most important tool, the jar lifter (boy, did I have splash a lot of boiling water around till I got one of those). As soon as those beets and cukes are ripe, go for it!

You can always add to your canning equipment collection over time as you find you really need something.

The hard part is waiting for the harvest, isn't it? My husband doesn't like pickled things so I don't do beets and cukes but boy, am I watching my tomatoes like a hawk!

Personally, I think it helps them to grow FASTER if they know you are keeping an eye on them and reminding them of their responsibilities lol! ;-)

Do keep us posted about your further canning adventures. Looking forward to hearing about them!

Zabby in Ontario


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RE: New to canning, questions

Its almost time to can pickled beets!! I called my MIL. This is her recipe for the syrup she has used for many yrs from an old Kerr canning book:

2 c sugar
2 c cider vinegar
2 c water
1 tsp. ground cloves
1 tsp. ground allspice
1 T. ground cinnamon

BWB 10 mins for pints

I want to use this recipe in the current BBB:

2 c sugar
2 sticks cinnamon
1 T. whole allspice
1 1/2 tsp. salt
3 1/2 c vinegar
1 1/2 c water

BWB 30 minutes, qrts or pints

1. Can you tell me if the first recipe is safe or needs adjustments to make it safe?
2. Can I use the BBB recipe with the spices/amounts listed in the first recipe?
3. What is the difference in the tastes of the vinegars?
4. If I use cider vinegar will to taste ok?
5. Can I use some of each vinegar?
6. Is it ok it leave out the salt?

Thank you sooo much for your help!
Sherri


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RE: New to canning, questions

Your MIL recipe is outdated when it comes to the vinegar to water ratio and the processing time. The processing time has been increased to 30 mins. for several editions of the BBB now because of the density and the amount of vinegar was increased in (I think) the 1990 or 94 edition but would have to check my books to be sure. You can use either one for the spices amounts and yes you can reduce or leave out the salt as it is just for flavor.

Cider vinegar is a softer milder flavor (we prefer it with beets) and white is a sharp flavor with more bite. But yes you can mix them if you wish as long as the total remains the same.

Check out the NCHFP recipe for another option - it's vinegar to water ratio is even higher and the onions are optional.

Dave

PS: we have found that with the BBB recipe you will need to make extra brine and don't leave the cinnamon sticks in the jars if you opt to not use a spice bag.

Here is a link that might be useful: Pickled Beets


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re: pss

Be sure to taste your brine before jarring them as you may find you want a bit of the salt or more sugar or more allspice to offset the white vinegar.


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RE: New to canning, questions

Dave, THANK YOU! THANK YOU!
I really appreciate your help!
I prefer not to try the onion recipe this yr.
I think I will try the cider cuz it sounds better for my taste buds.
I read on another thread to make extra brine. I forgot to ask about it here. I think I will double it and prepare a few extra beets. I can always chill some for eating. I can't wait to get started. I dreamed of this for yrs....God answered my hearts desire!
Sherri


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RE: New to canning, questions

There is (almost) nothing more rewarding than cracking the seal on a jar of peaches, tomatoes, etc and know that you grew them and put them up. For no other reason, you feel good about the work that went into putting them up. I will leave the actual canning advice to the pros but did want to add that there is a personal reward to the whole process. Good for you!! PS, I really wanted to put up beets this year and like the basic pickled recipe. I'm jealous since my garden got hailed on not once, but twice. :(((( Take care and happy canning! Lori


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RE: New to canning, questions

Yay, I finally got to can something...pickled beets! First time for BWB too. I remembered to do everything following the BBB directions and the canner instructions.
Things I did wrong:
1. Forgot to buy whole allspice so I used the spices in the above posted recipe.
2. I prepared the beets then measured them in the jars: ONLY 2 PINTS...ugh! So I went out to get more and prepared those.
I only got 3 pints total...(bittersweet)
Things I learned:
1. Recipe for brine was enough for the 3 pints and maybe 1 or 2 more. I used the leftover for marinating some boiled eggs.
2. Let the beets grow bigger, plant more next yr and try to plant them earlier.
3. Grow more veggies to can next yr!

....waiting...to can...pickles and more beets....waiting...to can...tomatoes and salsa...waiting...

Thanks everyone for your help and encouragement!!!!!


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RE: New to canning, questions

It's always a good idea to keep notes for each recipe, including how much you grew, how many jars yield you got, how you liked the recipe, any tips for organizing for canning, etc.

Most of the canning is done in the summer growing season and notes help you get "up-to-speed" next summer when you discover you've forgotten things.

I re-read my pressure-canner instructions and the NCHFP page every year, even though I've canned for a long time.

Carol


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RE: New to canning, questions

I'll agree with you on the grow more and let them get bigger part of your plan. ;) Seems a bit early to me for you to be harvesting beets in your zone already. What diameter were they?

The basic recipe calls for 7 lbs of 2 to 2-1/2-inch diameter beets for 8 pints and that is a low estimate. 3" diameter cut into quarters is even better and 7 lbs. of just the beets, not the tops. We average 10 lbs. per batch of 8 pints.

As Carol said, keep notes and they, plus experience, will serve you will in the future and help you avoid disappointments.

Dave


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RE: New to canning, questions

Here is a trick my mother-in-law taught me. She cooked and peeled the beets, cut them up and returned them to the pot. Then she kept adding 1 cup sugar, 1 cup water, 1 cup white vinegar until the beets in the pot were covered with liquid. It looks like the proportions of the brine are the same as in your receipe, but this way you make just enough for however many beets you have on hand.Bring to a boil and simmer for a few minutes to make sure the sugar is dissolved, then ladle in jars and seal. Process pints for 10 minutes, quarts for 15. We like them better without any spices.


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RE: New to canning, questions

Notice the NCHFP recipe is 2:1 vinegar to water. The Ball Blue Book has one recipe that's actually slightly higher in vinegar and one that's just slightly lower, but none of the tested recipes I know of currently use 1:1.

We used that old Kerr 1:1 recipe for a long time. I was sorry to quit using it, but have since found updated recipes I actually like better.

Processing time for pickled beets is 30 minutes. They're very dense. Like corn, it takes a long time for heat to penetrate.

Carol


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RE: New to canning, questions

I did mine 30 minutes plus 10 for elevation. Water 1 1/2cups and cider vinegar 3 1/2 cups.


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RE: New to canning, questions

Ok, but these are already boiling hot when they go in. Also, the sugar preserves them as well.


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RE: New to canning, questions

It doesn't matter. The Ball recipes and NCHFP recipe are hot-pack and with sugar. The processing time is still 30 minutes. Even my 1982 Kerr book had a processing time of 30 minutes. To get a 10 minute time I'd have to go back to my 1952 Kerr book. That's 58 years ago.

Carol


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RE: New to canning, questions

Sorry murkey but I agree fully with Carol - those instructions wouldn't be considered safe and haven't been for many years now. Not enough vinegar and not nearly long enough processing time.

It is your choice to use the recipe of course but we can't recommend it as safe for others.

Dave


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RE: New to canning, questions

The farm stands around here in zone 5 have plenty of gorgeous, big beets and have for a week or two (I don't grow them because DH doesn't like 'em). But it's been unusually hot here this year; everything is early. Maybe you've had the same hot summer, growninidaho?

Anyway, congrats on your first home-grown-and-canned veggies.

Murkey, digdirt Dave and I have an old dance around here where he says something "not safe" and I point out that it's "not recommended"---that doesn't mean it's "necessarily dangerous," but it does not meet current guidelines.

The gudielines are designed to guarantee 100% safe canned products. Plenty of people can for years according to outdated or non-recommended methods and never have a problem. Just like plenty of people drive without seat belts and don't get hurt in a car crash.

But personally, I like to wear my seat belt.

I hope you enjoy your beets!

Z, who doesn't cook them much because dh doesn't like them; sigh....


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RE: New to canning, questions

I think, and so do my friends the BBB Spicy Beets and Onions brine is excellent. Makes the best pickled eggs also.
You don't have to add onions if you don't want to, I make with and without.
I haven't even looked at other pickled beet recipes since I started using that brine.


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RE: New to canning, questions

Ok Zabby, I'll buy into the "not recommended" for the vinegar part but just got to put my big old size 12 foot down on the processing time.

10 mins. just ain't gonna cut it when 30 mins. has been "recommended" since at least 1952. When a recommendation gets that old its label is shortened to "Rule". :)

Dave


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RE: New to canning, questions

For years I was a pickled beet stick-in-the-mud. Everyone in my family used the Kerr recipe, updating as the Kerr books modified it, until the Kerr book was no longer published. Nobody even considered other options.

But when The Joy of Pickling came out I tried her pickled beets, which have brown sugar in the pickling solution. We loved them. I've since modified the spice mixture somewhat, but it's become our go-to.

I also tried her pickled beets with red wine and ginger. That was a real leap of faith because pickled beets are iconic in our house. I was astonished at how good they are.

I hope murkey wasn't put off by our comments. There are a lot of old recipes people stick with and that's their prerogative. But since many novices read these threads, it's important to note where canning methods and recipes diverge from the current standard.

I think families could go years without a problem using that old Kerr recipe. It's a matter of the odds and who can predict how those things turn out?

But if Ball and the USDA/NCHFP hadn't seen a risk in the old formulas for pickled beets, they wouldn't have changed it. The USDA/NCHFP particularly doesn't have the resources to be changing things that don't need changing. So new recommendations really catch my attention.

Believe me, I wasn't happy about adding citric acid to tomatoes. But I did it. And now I'm fine with it.

Carol


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RE: New to canning, questions

bumping this thread

Hi all! I am back to canning for the 2nd year.
Last yr I canned:
30 pts peaches
8 pts pears
37 1/2 pints Annies salsa (world famous)
6 pints plain beets (one seal popped so I threw it out and the jar too)
and about 15 pts pickled beets

Everything was great...which leads me to ask about this yrs pickled beets and other questions.

Recipe:
3 cups sugar
2 1/4 cups water
5 1/4 cups ACV
1 1/2 tsp ground cloves
1 1/2 tsp ground allspice
1 1/2 T. ground cinnamon
1 1/2 tsp salt

Last yr I used cheese cloth for the spices but I read that you can use a tea ball (the screen type, not the one with holes). So I just tried it and the brine was very dark. I pulled it out when I noticed and the tea ball had about 1/2 T. of spices left. 1. Sooo will the beets be so spicy that they will taste bad?

2. How do you keep the beets hot while skinning them from the ice water bath? They cool very fast. I had 7lbs.

3. Should I have just washed the jar the bad beets were in instead of throwing it out? I didn't see anything growing in it.

4. I know you are supposed to can the beets the same day you pick them. But what about salsa? My tomatoes get ripe in a box in October and I have to use frozen peppers instead of fresh.

Thanks for all your advice/help!!!
Sherri


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RE: New to canning, questions

want to hot pack green geans in a water bath, what amount of time do they need to be in the water bath before I take them out?


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RE: New to canning, questions

want to hot pack green geans in a water bath, what amount of time do they need to be in the water bath before I take them out?

Trying to do that hasn't been considered safe to do since well before World War II. So no time for doing it is available. Green beans are a high risk, low acid vegetable and must be pressure canned to be safe. If you have no pressure canner then freeze them.

Dave


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RE: New to canning, questions

thanks dave, for now I just boiled the beans and then canned them in lightly salted water then put them in the bath for 15 min's. I tried to freeze some last year and they came out tating funny. I will keep a close eye on them and not use them if they smell or look funny.


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RE: New to canning, questions

Botulism has no odor and no appearance changes that can be seen. It does not pop the jar seals, change colors, or do anything else. It is undetectable. It just sends you to the hospital - if you are lucky.

Back when BWB was used for green beans the required time was in hours not minutes. 3-4 hours.

Even the pressure canning time is 25 mins.

There simply is no way your green beans are safe to eat and the longer they sit on the shelf the more hazardous they become.

Dave


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