Return to the Harvest Forum | Post a Follow-Up

 o
sprouted sweet potatoes

Posted by melva02 z7 VA (My Page) on
Sun, Sep 10, 06 at 12:50

I have some sweet potatoes that have sprouted. If I cut off the sprouts, will the tubers contain any residual toxin? I know white potato shoots are poisonous, but I eat those even if I have to trim stubby sprouts off the eyes. These sweet potatoes have small pink-green vines with leaves.

I ask because I am cooking them for my dog, so with his smaller, more sensitive kidneys, I don't want to take a risk. I will peel, steam, and mash, then mix with peanut butter to fill his chew toys.

Melissa


Follow-Up Postings:

 o
RE: sprouted sweet potatoes

I wouldn't use them as food. Instead, I'd plant them to create more plants and tubors which would be safe. The eyes and sprouts are the most poisonous parts, but the toxins they produce DO infiltrate the rest of the tubour. Removing them will make little or no difference (as with ordinary potatoes). Cooking will only destroy about 40% of the toxins.

Did you know that you shouldn't ever give potato to dogs? Even potatoes of good quality can be toxic to dogs. I think the same also applies to sweet potato, but I don't know for sure. Best to check it out, don't you think? We should never assume that what is safe for humans is always safe for other species (or vice versa).


 o
RE: sprouted sweet potatoes

In the US, sweet potatoes are added to a lot of the premium dog foods with no harmful effects. I don't think they would be doing that if it were harmful to the animals.

I had a sprouted sweet potato just last week, cut the sprouts out, baked it and enjoyed it for dinner with no ill effects. I sometimes give a little baked sweet potato to my mini poodle as well as brown rice, green beans and his portion of quality canned dog food. I have to work to keep his weight up to 10 lbs.

Teresa


 o
RE: sprouted sweet potatoes

I believe that the sweet potato and its greens are totally different family compared to a regular potato. Regular potatoes are still in the nightshade family (related to tomatoes) and the leaves and stubs, and even green (exposed to light) potatoes can make you sick, as well as harm pets. The regular white flesh and the flesh of sweet potatoes are OK to feed to pets, but because they are also high in potassium, you may not want to give them too much, too often.


 o
RE: sprouted sweet potatoes

Ken, yes, white potatoes are a nightshade and sweet potatoes are a morning glory (or whatever that family is called). Sweet potatoes are recommended by my vet. After much more searching I found information that sweet potato shoots can be stir-fried, so I think I will cut them off & feed the cooked sweet potatoes to my dog, starting with a small serving just in case.

My dog trainer suggested adding more nutrition to chew toy fillings by mixing the usual peanut butter with canned pumpkin--commercially canned of course. I figure I will use sweet potatoes because he loves them & they're cheaper, plus I can make a meal for myself in the process.

Daisy, thanks for the advice, and Teresa, thanks for your experience. I'm hungry to cook them right now, and my portion will be full of butter & salt & pepper. I'm not much for adding sugar to sweet potatoes. Thanks all.

Melissa


 o
RE: sprouted sweet potatoes

I always told my parents they shouldn't make me eat green potatoes! I can't believe they didn't believe me.

Sweet potatoes are actually used the fancy prescription dog foods given to dogs with severe food allergies. Dogs rarely have any bad reaction to them, so if they get sick from regular food they're like to be given duck & sweet potato food or something weird like that.

Julie


 o
RE: sprouted sweet potatoes

Lactose, and soy are things that can give dogs bad reactions., not to mention chocolate. On the other hand a raw egg or two for a dog is good food and helps their coat.


 o
RE: sprouted sweet potatoes

Aren't onions bad for dogs also?


 o
RE: sprouted sweet potatoes

Onions might be, but I think its the next day when you notice that in the surrounding air.. need I go into details?


 o
RE: sprouted sweet potatoes

Melly, you're right, onions are hard on dogs' kidneys. I've heard similar about garlic, but I also have a dog cookbook [positive commentary only please! ;-) ] that says most dogs can handle garlic, and they love it. My dog had no problem with the small amount of garlic powder in his birthday party biscuits. (Yeah yeah, he's a rescue dog, ok, so I assigned him the same birthday as me & we had our dog & people friends over for a small afternoon party, I am not crazy, just crazy about him.)

Anyway, here's my personal list of what dogs can't eat:
onions & other alliums, except garlic powder
chocolate
coffee/tea/caffeine
grapes/raisins
green potatoes (thanks Daisy, I don't eat them either)
soy (estrogenic, should be eaten carefully by males anyway)
large amounts of lactose

I do let Bear taste my ice cream and drink leftover milk from cereal. Lactose is mostly a digestive upset, no permanent damage, and he seems to handle it well.

Melissa


 o
RE: sprouted sweet potatoes

My brothers dogs used to love tomatoes. They were german shepards


 o Post a Follow-Up

Please Note: Only registered members are able to post messages to this forum.

    If you are a member, please log in.

    If you aren't yet a member, join now!


Return to the Harvest Forum

Information about Posting

  • You must be logged in to post a message. Once you are logged in, a posting window will appear at the bottom of the messages. If you are not a member, please register for an account.
  • Posting is a two-step process. Once you have composed your message, you will be taken to the preview page. You will then have a chance to review your post, make changes and upload photos.
  • After posting your message, you may need to refresh the forum page in order to see it.
  • Before posting copyrighted material, please read about Copyright and Fair Use.
  • We have a strict no-advertising policy!
  • If you would like to practice posting or uploading photos, please visit our Test forum.
  • If you need assistance, please Contact Us and we will be happy to help.


Learn more about in-text links on this page here