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home canned celery

Posted by joval 4MN (My Page) on
Sat, Oct 6, 12 at 10:09

I have a nice crop of celery and would like to can it for winter. I know I can freeze it, but we have more room in the root cellar than the freezer and keeping it fresh is not an option. Please offer suggested recipes and canning directions and how it worked for you. The idea I have is to can the celery and use it later to add to soup, hotdish, etc or make cream of celery soup by adding the canned celery to a white sauce. Thank you.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: home canned celery

AFAIK there are no tested or approved celery canning methods. It just isn't a commonly done thing so because of the disinterest in doing it, it has never been tested. Is it done? Sure but the methods and pressure canning time required is just guess work.

It could be pickled in straight vinegar of course but them you'd have that vinegar flavor to it.

I have read about canning it by blanching the pint jar-sized stalks for 3 mins. in boiling water, filling the jars with the blanched stalks, covering with fresh boiled water and pressure canning it for 35 mins. But is it safe to do? No one knows.

Sounds like it would be just celery mush to me since it is 90% water to begin with. I prefer to dehydrate it or freeze it chopped. Easy to do and takes up little space.

JMO

Dave


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RE: home canned celery

Celery mush and fibers, I'm afraid. Just in case we missed something I did a new Google search for .edu sites only to see if any Extension or Horticultural program had info on canning celery, but aside from things like stewed tomatoes or in pickling, there just wasn't anything. Dave is right on that.

I did locate an old thread on this forum. It's short but gives some additional feedback. The mirepoix idea is a great one, if you're so inclined.

Carol

Here is a link that might be useful: Preserving Celery


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RE: home canned celery

Dehydrate and toss it in a jar with an O2 absorber.


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RE: home canned celery

Thank you everyone for your comments. I was hoping something NEW had happened in preserving celery. As I was thinking about my celery yesterday I came to the conclusion that freezing would be the best & fastest way to get the job done. But I might be out of luck, it froze very hard here last night. The celery is covered with blankets but I don't know if it was enough protection. I maybe already have celery mush. Thank you .


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RE: home canned celery

Joval, how well did your celery do under blankets?

Tonight it will freeze here (zone 5) and I have been harvesting my celery all summer. I hate to lose any celery as I love it.

As I have done before, I harvested a row of celery into buckets with a few inches of water. This gives me a couple of weeks to eat, cook, dry, freeze, etc.

I have dehydrated celery, and it does work well for recipes but it does not (for me) reconstitute the way corn or carrots do. Freezing does not appeal to me. I cannot imagine it thawing in any form that would be appetizing.

I am now making celery soup. The first batch I pureed and so did not can those. I froze them.

Then I made this recipe:
http://www.sbcanning.com/2012/07/celery-soup.html

based on this recipe:
http://culinaryarts.about.com/od/pureeacutedsoups/r/celerypuree.htm

The butter becomes oil (to have no dairy, I suppose). So I canned those.

Tomorrow I will find out how well the row of celery plants under a sheet does with the cold tonight. In spring, celery is not sensitive to cold the way many plants are. In fall, I harvest it after tomatoes, zucchini, etc.

I give it priority over parsley, chard, and other herbs that do not seem to be bothered by mere frost.

There is a thread here that says "no oil" in canned recipes. The quoted source is http://nchfp.uga.edu/how/can_04/soups.html where oil is NOT given as a no-no.

So, how about the oil I used to soften the onions? Any problem?


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RE: home canned celery

As we have said here many many times, oil in tested applications is fine. Obviously with pressure canned meats and soups, a certain amount of oil/fat is inevitable. The issue is whether the recipe falls within safe guideliness.

Carol


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RE: home canned celery

Thank you, Carol. I increased the time to 60 minutes. I do not entirely trust SB Canning (based on errors and on the home-guessing flavor of the site). Maybe I will try this recipe again this weekend and just freeze it. The dry white wine gives it a nice aroma (I only tasted a spoonful of it at the end of the cooking).

With an hour in the canner, I try to just barely cook the recipes, not to end up with mush.


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RE: home canned celery

60 minutes plus the usual wait time after gauge reaches zero would be fine for pints. Quarts would be 75 but otherwise there's no problem with the recipe that I can see.

Link is provided for those not familiar with soup instructions.

Carol

Here is a link that might be useful: How to Can Soups


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RE: home canned celery

I've dehydrated my celery very slow and low and it actually works! It is not like fresh, but held up well in soups and cooking uses. Maybe you should try it.
I have had only one batch rehydrate too soft so far. Get it real dry, but do it real slow, and I think you will be pleased.


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RE: home canned celery

Thank you Sheila and Carol. I will be comparing the frozen celery (never done that before) to my Excalibur-dried celery. I never met a celery I did not like (cutting celery, celery root/celeriac...).


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