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Scientific American Article 'The Case Against Heirloom Tomatoes''

Posted by yumtomatoes 10a/FLA (My Page) on
Wed, Feb 1, 12 at 15:30

This is a cross post from over on the Tomato forum. I thought it would be interesting to discuss the article linked to below here, too.

Here is a link that might be useful: The Case Against Heirloom Tomatoes


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Scientific American Article 'The Case Against Heirloom Tomato

There is already 96 comments there, and I agree with all replies stated. There seems nothing to discuss.


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RE: Scientific American Article 'The Case Against Heirloom Tomato

Just wait: Seed of Change, Organic Gardening Mag, Seed Savers and Baker Creek are going to be ALL over this article. Can you say "Poop flinging"?


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RE: Scientific American Article 'The Case Against Heirloom Tomato

  • Posted by pauln z7B Arkansas (My Page) on
    Tue, Feb 14, 12 at 11:55

Any article that lumps the hundreds (thousands) of varieties into one category is suspect from the start. Yes, some heirloom varieties do not perform well. Yes, some varieties are much more suceptable to diseases. Yes, some hybrid varieties produce well and taste good.

However, checking with local people who know what they're talking about goes a long way in helping someone find a variety that is suitable to your area and produces well. Breeders don't care about taste. They are only concerned with disease resistance and portability/storage life.


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RE: Scientific American Article 'The Case Against Heirloom Tomato

Then why have they been around for several hundreds of years - and thousands of varieities in the seed banks - hybrid - since the late 40's and how many varieties are there? and why are they not in the seed banks of the world - oh that's right big seed companies have secret breeding to produce inferior tomatoes - enough said


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RE: Scientific American Article 'The Case Against Heirloom Tomato

Nearly every paragraph of this article contains some factual error, inconsistency or faulty reasoning. It is very sloppily written. I'm surprised Scientific American published it.

Jim


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RE: Scientific American Article 'The Case Against Heirloom Tomato

It's not paranoia when they really ARE out to get you! LOL


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RE: Scientific American Article 'The Case Against Heirloom Tomato

Ok so here is my take, you may have only a few mutations that govern the tomato shape, size and color, but you only have a few genes that control lots of things genetically. For example, the differences in domesticated dogs genetically speaking is very small, even between wolves and dogs, but there are vast differences in appearance, stamina, coat color, coat texture etc. Also there is only 2% difference between humans and Chimps gentetically, but that 2% makes quite a difference in terms of our adaptaions (large brain size, opposable thumb, bipedal walking, ect.). This is an article describing, in part, the work of Monsanto, a company looking to dominate the seeds of the world.


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RE: Scientific American Article 'The Case Against Heirloom Tomato

So according to the article, heirloom tomatoes only yield two fruits per plant??? Anyone who gets that poor a yield from any tomato, is not qualified to speak as an expert. This article reads more like a political hit piece than true objective science.


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RE: Scientific American Article 'The Case Against Heirloom Tomato

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Sat, Mar 10, 12 at 12:25

Maybe Monsanto bought Scientific American.


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RE: Scientific American Article 'The Case Against Heirloom Tomato

Unfortunately, Scientific American, a magazine I used to truly enjoy, became more political than scientific several years ago. But then, science itself has become highly political.

Jim


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RE: Scientific American Article 'The Case Against Heirloom Tomato

  • Posted by t-bird Chicago 5/6 (My Page) on
    Wed, Mar 21, 12 at 5:59

sad and true, Jim!


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