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taming my herbs.

Posted by carriblue 7 (My Page) on
Tue, Jun 4, 13 at 16:49

It's June 4th and my parsley is starting to go to flower. my thyme has been flowering for a while now,my oregano is 16 inches tall and starting to flower. This isn't even getting started on the veggies that somehow never did what they were supposed to . I feel like I am floundering.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: taming my herbs.

Cut off all of the flowers!!


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RE: taming my herbs.

Parsley is biennial and it will go for seed production in the second year. You could've cut the stems earlier when they were young and tender. You can even cut and use the tender part(including the buds and seed pods. They are even tastier than the leaves. At the same time you can allow a few to develop seeds so you can save and plant them next year. At the end of this season you can just pull them up and free the space for next year's planting. Even you can do it right now, among the existing parsleys.

O' those oreganos need to be cut back too before the get too wood.


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RE: taming my herbs.

  • Posted by t-bird Chicago 5/6 (My Page) on
    Sat, Jun 8, 13 at 12:10

I had trouble with parsley going to seed in it's first year when I winter sowed. The parsley felt like summer was year 2.

Did you winter sow? Or buy starts somewhere?

Never again winter sowing with parsley.

I like to have 2 kinds of parsley planted alternate years. Curly and italian.

So for ex: last year I was suppose to have 1st yr plants of italian flat leaf, and 2 year plants of curly going to seed.

this year - the established flat leaf would give me harvestable parsley very early while the curly that went to seed is trying to germinate. By the time the italian flat leaf is bolting, the curly is harvestable.

This would be working out great until I tried the winter sowing and had 2 kinds going to seed at once, lol.

Oh well, I've got mutt seedlings this year, I'll let you all know how they turn out!


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RE: taming my herbs.

" never did what they were supposed to .....' Your herbs are doing exactly what they are supposed to ie growing well and reproducing themselves which shows they are happy.

'I feel like I am floundering'. I don't know why - you've successfully grown two lovely big clumps of luxuriant herbs. The Oregano could have a little trim, but it's not absolutely necessary. In Italian markets you see bunches of dried oregano flowering stems for sale. They are fine for cooking. I just shear mine over in the Autumn tidy up. The parsley may or may not self sow but you can still use those leaves stems and seeds in coking.


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RE: taming my herbs.

I direct sow them early spring and let them to decide to germinate whenever is right(air and soil temperatures) That is how the seeds that fall off parsley plant, will grow following year. Of course , in cool soil and weather, have to be patient and do not give up on them. Might take 3 weeks or longer to germinate.

PS: winter sown parsley seeds is the same as spring sown. Because during the winter the seed will be dormant.


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