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Hardy Hibiscus propagation

Posted by halaeva z6 Etobicoke (My Page) on
Fri, Aug 25, 06 at 23:06

Does anyone would like to show me the easiest method of propagation of Hardy Hibiscus?
Any suggestions will be greatly appraciated.
Hala.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Hardy Hibiscus propagation

The method most successful for me has been layering. I take low limbs/stems and bend them over into a pot of soil. I cover the stem with soil and put a rock or brick on top to hold it down. Water often, keep moist. Check it in a few weeks for roots. When rooted simply cut the stem away from the mother plant. It works 90% plus for me.


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RE: Hardy Hibiscus propagation

Thank you Terry.I'll try your way of propagation.
Hala.


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RE: Hardy Hibiscus propagation

I have also heard that you can take a 4 to 6 inch cutting from a hibiscus. Cut at an angle. Dip the cutting in a root hormone.

The cutting can then be placed in pot that contains a mix of 50% peat moss and 50% vermiculite. Potting soil would probably work too. Poke a hole with a pencil approximatly 2 inches deep and insert the cutting end that has the rooting hormone applied. Cover the entire pot and cutting with a plastic bag and make sure it gets sunlight or artificial light. In 4 to 6 weeks (or less) the cutting will hopefully have develope roots.

While the first method is much simpler, this method is a good one to use in the fall if you want to try and propagate over the winter. You'll just be cutting away what the frost would kill anyways. Just make sure you have sufficient lighting--such as a plant light/flouresent light.


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RE: Hardy Hibiscus propagation

Mstrainer,thank you so much your propagation instruction.I appreciate it.
Hala.


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RE: Hardy Hibiscus propagation

Why cover with a plastic bag? Everytime I cover things with a plastic bag, I get way too much condensation and usually damp-off stuff where I'm at. I always leary of covering plants like that but will if I have to.


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RE: Hardy Hibiscus propagation

The plastic bag might be recommended because hibiscus love water? The instructions may well work without the plastic bag. Also, I think a lot of rooting hormone products contain a fungicide. If anyone tries this without the plastic bag, please let me know how it goes.

I love this web site and forum. There are so many wonderful people and suggestions.


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You're welcome

Oh--and Hala, I really appreciate the thank you. :)


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RE: Hardy Hibiscus propagation

Ok..I'm trying something different ..Maybe I am dumb but what the heck? I took cuttings from my bush and stuck them in water. I did this anout a week ago. They all have developed new leaves. No roots yet of course but I am watching them! Think I have a chance??


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RE: Hardy Hibiscus propagation

Hi Dreamer53.This is a hint for me.I will do the same at once.Only I am not sure if I take cuttings properly.From steam,from branch of Hibiscus Mosch? Actually I am not good at it.I think you have a chance and I wish you a good luck.
Thanks for assistance.
hala


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RE: Hardy Hibiscus propagation

I contine to research this method of propogation. When you take the cutting, cut at a 45 degree angle right below a leaf node (where a leaf meets the stem). Remove most of the leaves except for some near the top of the cutting.
Scrape off the bottom inch of bark (I used my fingernail) and dip the cutting in a root hormone. Then plant in a rooting medium such as 2 parts Perlite to 1 part peat moss. The plants should root in 6 to 8 weeks. Keep covered with plastic for that time--then gradually expose the plants to air.

Here in Zone 5 where I am, it will be too late to plant my cuttings outdoors, so I am going to try and keep them alive inside this winter.

And also--please let me know how the plain water method goes.


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RE: Hardy Hibiscus propagation

Thanks mstrainer for the great info.
I will let you know how the plain water method works for me. Now,the cuttings are in the water and show nothing.It is to early I think.


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RE: Hardy Hibiscus propagation

Hi mstrainer.
About the plain water method of propagation: It is not succesful for me.I will try again next spring.Also I'll try all methods I've learned.here.
Hala.


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RE: Hardy Hibiscus propagation

I am currently trying to propagate a hibiscus by taking a stem after the knot and cut it at a 45 degree angle. I dipped it in root toner and stuck it in a vase of water. I has been a week and it still looks good. I have tried to propagate before by doing all the same except i placed it in soil not water, all failed in the soil. My grandma says to put in water let it root and plant it. I will post later if it works.


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does the water method work? I keep taking cuttings off my grandma's plant and trying to root them in soil. They keep dying. Grandma lives two hours away...so I want to get it right next time! thx


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I do hope you are planting the seeds also for more grown. After all your local friends and neighbors may enjoy a few extra plants.


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Here's a link with step-by-step instructions:
http://video.about.com/gardening/cuttings-from-hardwoods.htm


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RE: Hardy Hibiscus propagation

Putting a bag over the pot helps maintain humidity preventing water loss from the cutting as does halving the large leaves and clipping off very fresh growth. I have never had success rooting hibiscus in water they tend to rot. The best thing for me has been placing 6" semi-hardwood cuttings dipped in root hormone 3nodes deep in 80% small red cinder and 20% sphagnum w/ a couple drops of superthrive. I also put the powder hormone in a ziplock and coat the base then just jam it in.


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RE: Hardy Hibiscus propagation

look up home made root hormone. it is easy and works. willow bark liquid.


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RE: Hardy Hibiscus propagation

Check with your local extension agent but here it seems any branches that are removed while pruning works for tropical as well as hardy hibiscus. Of course if they go to seed they seem to do just fine also, so have fun and enjoy the world of propagation.


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RE: Hardy Hibiscus propagation

  • Posted by tapla z5b-6a mid-MI (My Page) on
    Sat, Feb 18, 12 at 12:59

Hardy hibs are exceedingly easy to dig and divide in spring and fall. All you need is a root division and you have the makings of a new clump.

Al

Photobucket


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RE: Hardy Hibiscus propagation

I used the same method as above, with half peat moss, half sand, and it worked great, too. Six of my seven cuttings have tiny new leaves. I didn't think of using a plastic bag, maybe because it's so humid here in Tampa, but I'll give that a shot next time. I also didn't think to peal back the outer bark an inch, but it worked just fine.

The hibiscus in our yard looked like a joke. Just a few random sticks jutting out of the ground at weird long angles. The portions I cut back look much better now, and I have new baby plants from the bits I lopped off. I'm thinking if I put the cuttings back with the old plants, they might actually resemble a hibiscus one day.

Now I'm going to go for a bike ride, with my clippers, and see if any neighbors have nice hibiscus they wouldn't mind sharing.


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RE: Hardy Hibiscus propagation

I took two cuttings from my parents hibiscus and I'm trying two different ways of propagation. The first is a clipping cut at an angle under a leaf node. Then I dipped it in root hormone and placed it in a glass of water. The second I did the same as the first with the cutting and hormone but placed it in plastic pot, with drainage holes, filled with pertlite. I placed the pot in a dish with water that is covering the drainage holes and then placed a plastic bag over it with a couple small ventilation holes. I'm really new to the whole propagating business but I'm hoping for the best.


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RE: Hardy Hibiscus propagation

Anyone have a follow-up as to how this worked out?


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RE: Hardy Hibiscus propagation

  • Posted by esox07 4b Wisconsin (My Page) on
    Mon, Sep 2, 13 at 19:53

I would like to know as well. Anyone?


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RE: Hardy Hibiscus propagation

For me, they bloom from seed the first year (all over the property!) I have never even considered moving them. I do, however pull out seedlings all over the place.


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RE: Hardy Hibiscus propagation

  • Posted by esox07 4b Wisconsin (My Page) on
    Tue, Sep 24, 13 at 22:18

I bought two different ones this fall. Before transplanting them outside, I took a cutting from each. I put them in a small glass with water and mixed in about two teaspoons of rooting compound. I know it is normally used to root cuttings in soil but I have used it on other plants this way with good success. Well, after about two weeks I had roots coming out of the plants all over the place. One key is to strip the outer skin off of the plant on the lower half inch or so just above where you made the cutting. I have since transplanted them into starter containers with soil and after two days, they are still looking good. I am too busy right now but I will try to remember to post a photo later on.
Bruce


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RE: Hardy Hibiscus propagation

  • Posted by esox07 4b Wisconsin (My Page) on
    Sat, Nov 2, 13 at 13:29

I took a cutting from a Red Luna Hardy Hibiscus and a Pink Elephant Hardy Hibiscus and mixed a bit of rooting compound in a small glass of water. I placed the two cuttings in the glass and within a couple weeks they had roots.
This is what they looked like just after I took the cuttings and placed them in the water with rooting compound, september 17th. The black twist tie is so I can differentiate the Red Luna from the Pink Elephant.
 photo 20130917HibiscusCuttings001_zpsdd821fdd.jpg

This is what they looked like just after transfering from the water to the soil ( I didn't think to photo the roots shooting out of the stems before I planted them. September 25th) :
 photo 20130925HydrandgeaCuttings_zps11595bec.jpg

This is what they looked like a few days ago on October 29th: You can see they are growing nicely at this point. They should be nice plants when Spring comes back around up here in Wisconsin.
 photo 20131029HibiscusCuttings2_zps8bd29cc7.jpg

Bruce


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RE: Hardy Hibiscus propagation

I currently have 3 cuttings in water - I just cut the stem off at a 45 degree angle below a leaf, dipped the end in rooting hormone, and placed in a clear bottle by my west-facing kitchen window. They all have roots on them. In fact, I did have 5, and just planted 2 in soil and gave them to a friend. I have some cuttings that a few weeks ago I planted from the water method, that also had roots on them from using the same bottle and same placement. This is the way my mom has always rooted cuttings as well, and she has produced multiple plants successfully this way.

Good luck to everyone! (And if anyone wants a double red hibiscus cutting, let me know - that's what two of my three are, and I'm happy to share - I've included a photo of what the plant I took the cuttings from looks like.) :)


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RE: Hardy Hibiscus propagation

  • Posted by esox07 4b Wisconsin (My Page) on
    Fri, Nov 8, 13 at 21:54

I took cuttings of my Hibiscus's just before the first frost up here. They are doing well right now. I started them in water and they quickly set roots and I have since transfered them to small containers with soil. Since I am in Wisconsin and the ground is beginning to freeze now, I will be keeping them inside for the next 6 months or so. Can I expect them to survive inside with limited sunlight until next Spring?
Bruce


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RE: Hardy Hibiscus propagation

  • Posted by esox07 4b Wisconsin (My Page) on
    Mon, Nov 11, 13 at 0:06

Anybody???


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RE: Hardy Hibiscus propagation

Bruce - You could probably get them to survive by keeping them close to (but not touching) whatever window you have that receives the most sunlight throughout the winter. Do you have a room that gets cold but does not freeze, such as a spare bedroom? After a few weeks growth so that you have further good root development, you might try letting your plants go dormant and keeping them in the cold room. You would need to occasionally provide moisture for them when the soil becomes dry, but definitely do not over water them during the winter or you will have root rot. Good luck.
Mary


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Deleting double post.

This post was edited by gmatx on Wed, Nov 13, 13 at 10:45


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RE: Hardy Hibiscus propagation

  • Posted by esox07 4b Wisconsin (My Page) on
    Mon, Nov 11, 13 at 14:37

Thanks Mary.
If I move them to a cool room, could it be one without light? Or would they need at least a little light. The reason I am asking is that I could put them in the basement utility room which is much cooler than the rest of the house but there are no windows.
Bruce


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Bruce - A room without windows would be fine to put them in for their dormant period. If you are going to let them get some additional growth before moving them to the basement, I would recommend slowly reducing their water and light (move them further away from the window daily) so that they complete the storage of energy before completely shutting down for dormancy. Best of luck.


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Deleting a double post - again. What's with this?

This post was edited by gmatx on Thu, Nov 14, 13 at 13:59


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I have had several instructions regarding propagation in which I was instructed to over with a plastic bag. What I did was cut a bottom part out of the 2 liter plastic soda bottle and put plastic bottle over the cutting. it worked great. I did that for a Princess flower and every cutting I did that way worked. It also stayed in place and it didn't touch the cutting.


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RE: Hardy Hibiscus propagation

  • Posted by esox07 4b Wisconsin (My Page) on
    Fri, Jul 18, 14 at 18:29

To update: I overwintered that hibiscus cutting and have actually taken two cuttings off it and all three are in the ground and doing fabulous. They overwintered just great and the original is now a good 2 feet tall and getting ready to throw out some blooms. For me, taking cuttings and getting them to root was very easy. Overwintering them was just as easy.
Bruce


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Very interesting post--thank you all for sharing your experiences!


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RE: Hardy Hibiscus propagation

  • Posted by esox07 4b Wisconsin (My Page) on
    Sat, Jul 19, 14 at 10:11

Here is a couple photos of my Hibiscus Cuttings. This one is the original cutting that I took late last fall. It is circled in blue and is next to another Hibiscus but a slightly different variety.
 photo 20140719Hibiscus1_zpsea48a80e.jpg
This is a photo of the buds on the cutting:
 photo 20140719HibiscusBuds_zpsa73d5a3e.jpg
And this one is a cutting taken from the original cutting pictured above. It is next to the plant that is the parent to the original cutting. I notice that it is a slightly different shade of green and it has something going on with the tops leaves but is otherwise doing quite well.
 photo 20140719Hibiscus2_zps7ab45ca0.jpg

I have another question however: In the fall, after they die back, do I pruned them back to ground level, leave them alone or what? Last fall, I trimmed them back to about 10" tall thinking that the new growth would come out of the remaining stems, but all the growth came from in the soil around the existing stem. So, should I just lop them all off at ground level this fall?
Thanks,
Bruce


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Thanks for all the ideas about taking cuttings. I am going to try a few and see how I do. My original plant got soooo much bigger than I thought it would that I will have to move it either this Fall or in the Spring. Any recommendations? (It won't do a hard freeze until Thanksgiving and even then it may not.)


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  • Posted by esox07 4b Wisconsin (My Page) on
    Tue, Jul 22, 14 at 21:20

I am not real sure but it would seem logical to do it now. That way the root system will have time to adapt to the new location before the first freeze and colder weather moves in. My next guess would be spring. Either way, you are likely going to stall it's growth for a while after it is transplanted. I have taken cuttings successfully from a number of different plants and beleive me, Hardy Hibiscus is one of the easiest. I will probably take three or four this fall before the end of the season for planting out next spring. Your best bet is to take the cutting at the tip of some new growth. 4-6" would probably be good.
Good Luck,
Bruce


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re: fall pruning.

Yes, cut them down to the ground. Like you've discovered, most of any new shoots will come from under the ground portion of the plant.

I usually cut them down to an inch or two above ground level to easily mark where each plant is next spring..


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RE: Hardy Hibiscus propagation

  • Posted by esox07 4b Wisconsin (My Page) on
    Wed, Jul 23, 14 at 17:08

yupislyr: Thanks for confirming what I was contemplating. That is what I will be doing this fall. I am anxiously waiting for them to bloom this year. Several nice looking buds, but they haven't seen fit to open up yet.
Bruce


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esox07, what method did you use for overwintering? I would love to take cuttings, but would want to bring them in for the winter and want to put them in the right spot. :)


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  • Posted by esox07 4b Wisconsin (My Page) on
    Wed, Jul 23, 14 at 18:58

OK, this is what I did. First of all, take the cutting off of the top of one of the main stems (newest growth). Do this before the first freeze. You want to cut it about 4-6" down the stem and just BELOW one of the nodes. Then take a knife and scar the bottom inch or so of the stem. Just lighly scar it. This will help promote rooting from that area. Then, you can optionally dip the bottom of the stem in rooting compound which helps but isn't necessary. At this point you have two choices. One is to plant the bottom couple inches into a small container with damp soil. Or, what I prefer, you can put it in a glass of water with the top portion above the water line and the bottom two inches or so under the water line. The water method seems to work the best for me. Plus, you can see the roots and know it is working.
This is what it should look like (the gunk in the water is the rooting compound).
 photo 20140313HibiscusCuttingfromHibiscuscutting_zpsefca68d3.jpg

Now you want to keep the cutting where it will get some direct sunlight. Where I had mine, it got minimal direct sun. 2-4 hours is probably fine as long as it gets indirect light the rest of the day. Three to four weeks later, you should see something like this:
 photo 20140408HibiscusCutting002_zpsa95bfe85.jpg
 photo 20140409HibiscusCutting-Readyforsoil_zps721d89ea.jpg
Those are some pretty well formed roots and it is ready for soil. Find a suitable container and fill it with some relatively loose well draining soil. Plant the cutting in it to about 1" above the roots and water the soil well.
 photo 20140410HibiscusCuttingPlanted2_zpsa3ff99cc.jpg
Keep it pretty moist for the first week and then after that, you should just ensure that it doesn't dry out completely. It is best not to over water as much as under water after the plant is established in the soil. after a week or so in the soil, you should move the plant to a place where it will get as much light as possible during the winter months. This will set it on its way to growing a good root system for when it gets planted out for the summer. You may have to upgrade to a larger container before spring and you may want to prune it back during the winter to keep it from getting too big...if you do, keep a trimming or two for more cuttings...that is what the one in the photos is from. I took it as a cutting off of a plant I started as a cutting the previous fall. The cuttings I took last fall and transplanted outside this spring are two feet tall plus already and are putting out many buds which I expect to bloom in the next couple weeks.

If you have any other questions, let me know.
Bruce


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RE: Hardy Hibiscus propagation

thanks so much. nice and clear......will give this a shot and see how I do over the winter. :)....


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RE: Hardy Hibiscus propagation

  • Posted by esox07 4b Wisconsin (My Page) on
    Wed, Jul 23, 14 at 22:18

Good luck,
Bruce


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