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Where is the best place to buy farm land?

Posted by mike758 none (My Page) on
Tue, Jan 7, 14 at 9:49

I'm currently somewhat young and I live in a former country town, now suburbs in southeast Pennsylvania, becoming more and more dense. I want to escape the over development and even start my own farm. I also want to live an "off the grid" lifestyle. Now whether this farm will be more of a hobby farm or my main source of income is still in debate now, I still have to learn more about the lifestyle to determine that. I may even go into a help exchange program to learn more about farming. I do have agriculture experience, I just have never lived on a farm.

Anyway, when you talk about either escaping the over development or starting a farm, people always say to "head west". The question is where? I know in my town the only remaining farms are rich horse farms, because land is worth about 50,000 an acre taxes are really high. Even some of the rural areas around me in Pennsylvania and New Jersey are still pretty expensive to buy land from, and they constantly face pressure of development.

I'm looking for a realistic place to live that has affordable farmland, cheap taxes, and where I wouldn't have to worry about developments going up suddenly. I also don't care if I have to live on the other side of the country either, it might sound like I want to stay local but I seriously don't care. I don't think there even are good places to start a farm on the east coast.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Where is the best place to buy farm land?

hi Mike, Are you going to raise; live stock?, garden? They have water shortage in many places to the west. Your looking in the high dollar area's. There are much more reasonable properties.

I can only tell about NY, There are lots of farms here very cheap to buy, like $30,000 for about 8 acres. They are older homes so the taxes arent much. There is money to be made easily. Yet the towns are small, like population 600. The people are great too, excellent schools. Winters can be cold, but it kills the bugs off. Our soil is like black gold, rainfall perfect.

Where you go is dependent on what you plan to do when you get there.
Mea


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RE: Where is the best place to buy farm land?

I plan to do both. Like I said I'm still young and don't have a plan set in stone, but I would like to both grow crops and raise livestock. New York actually may be nice because I would still be somewhat close to my folks at home. Are there any specific areas there you would recommend?


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RE: Where is the best place to buy farm land?

I've heard that TN is a great place b/c they're pretty lenient on building codes in general, pretty good soil, you can grow almost year round if not actually year round, and lots of rural land available. Rivers as well and low population density. Definitely worth checking out.


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RE: Where is the best place to buy farm land?

Walla Walla Washington of course! there are plenty of places, land, lots, and area here!


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RE: Where is the best place to buy farm land?

I'm thinking upstate New York. It is pristine up there. Very friendly people. The soil should be great without adding anything altho that would help things grow better. It seems like a great area to live. Low crime, no traffic, etc. Fresh air. God's country!


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RE: Where is the best place to buy farm land?

I think TN would fit the bill for you. If you own more than 15 acres, there is no property tax on the land and the property taxes on your home are one of the lowest states. (Investment and sales taxes are higher though.)

It has four seasons but winter is much shorter than you are used to.


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RE: Where is the best place to buy farm land?

I sold a bunch of 10 acre parcels in 2007 for 8-9k each in Central Nebraska. Rain can be short at times, but ground water is Nebraska's strong suit. Windier here than you would be used to and probably colder. Lots less people. Nebraska has more cows than people.


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RE: Where is the best place to buy farm land?

I am a little late to this discussion but I have to chime in here since I have some experience in this area. I would absolutely not go to TN to try to homestead. I just left there after two years of battling the elements. I was east of the Smokies which is more temperate than central and west TN and could not make a go growing food. Soil is clay, wind is very high year round, tornadoes are frequent as well as heavy downpours and hail on a regular basis, bugs are unbelievable since it never really gets cold enough to kill them. After a few years I gave up and moved back to PA. Taxes are cheap, yes, but there are no local services and some areas are so remote and difficult to access that you need a four wheel drive just to get home. In areas where they are practically giving the land away you wilI find extremely rocky soil and no access roads. I did meet some people who had settled in with goats or growing tobacco if you would be interested in those. Central and west TN are way too hot and humid for my taste. Tornadoes have become more frequent in those areas and a lot of people are leaving. PA is definitely not the place for cheap land, but it has the right climate and soil for self sufficiency as well as lots of water. I am thinking of going north from here to cooler weather year round. I do see taxes can be very high in New York and other northern states. You might have a look around eastern West Virginia for some large tracts of land. I am not sure of the soil conditions there. Love to know what you have decided to do since I am on the same journey.


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