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Pineywoods cattle and Gulf Coast sheep

Posted by stoneunhenged (My Page) on
Tue, Apr 24, 07 at 9:45

Here are some pics that I took yesterday evening.

I have three Pineywoods cattle (two heifers and a bull) on about six acres of, well, piney woods. Here's the bull and a heifer:

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I have six Gulf Coast native sheep; one ram, four ewes, and a three-week old lamb. (If you think about the lamb's coloring, it makes you wonder whether he kept his eye on the ewes at all times.)

The ram:

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Ewes and lamb:

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Both these breeds are ideally suited to where I live in North Florida. They are heat tolerant, naturally parasite resistant, and have gone through 500 years of natural selection to adapt to the local habitat.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Pineywoods cattle and Gulf Coast sheep

What are pineywoods cattle bred for? Milk, meat, oxen or ?


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RE: Pineywoods cattle and Gulf Coast sheep

Bred for all three things, but primarily for meat.


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RE: Pineywoods cattle and Gulf Coast sheep

I also have Pineywoods cattle and native sheep. Please e-mail me off-list so we can share information. I live in Lake City.


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RE: Pineywoods cattle and Gulf Coast sheep

Sorry, I forgot to include my contact information.
E-mail address: old_cowhunter@yahoo.com

I have Florida Cracker Cattle, Pineywoods Cattle, Florida Native Sheep, and other rare heritage breeds of livestock.


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RE: Pineywoods cattle and Gulf Coast sheep

Those cows look pretty cool. Though with such a small herd wouldn't it be easier to do AI than to keep a bull? Also I've been looking into dual-purpose cows and the pineywoods breed came up with the bonus of saving/preserving a endangered livestock breed. I've been wanting a cow that gave a good ammount of milk a day(about 4lbs) while having salvage value. Could a pineywoods do that? And are they calm and docile suitable for a beginner like me. You also mentioned that they were idally suited to florida being heat resistent, would they be okay in ohio with the wind rain snow etc.? thanks.


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RE: Pineywoods cattle and Gulf Coast sheep

I've heard of a few people milking Pineywoods. I've never done it. They're pretty easy to handle. Not huge and not bad dispositions.

I have three more heifers since I posted these pictures, so my bull:cow ratio is 1:5.

I assume they'd be okay in Ohio. It gets pretty cold during the winter in part of their natural range. They don't seem to mind cold.


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RE: Pineywoods cattle and Gulf Coast sheep

Your Gulf Coast native sheep look very happy. I was hoping that when I get some land one day, maybe I would keep some kind of heat tolerant breed.
What do you do with the fleece? I would be willing to purchase some fleece from you if any still available. I would like to see how it feels to the hand while spinning, and of course the finished product.
You can contact me at gwemau44@yahoo.com if you would like.
Thanks


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RE: Pineywoods cattle and Gulf Coast sheep

I emailed you. Happy to help.


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RE: Pineywoods cattle and Gulf Coast sheep

I am interested in the fleece. Please let me know if you have any available. I'll be travelling to Florida, Orlando, in June 08. Thank you very much.


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RE: Pineywoods cattle and Gulf Coast sheep

I know this is an old thread, but I hadn't ever heard of the native sheep before. Where in N. FL are you? We are in Milton.
I am really interested in getting some sheep. Can they go in pastures with goats or will there be issues with temperments or parasites?


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RE: Pineywoods cattle and Gulf Coast sheep

When I google gulf coast native I don't find sheep with the same beautiful faces your sheep have, are you sure that is what they are?


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RE: Pineywoods cattle and Gulf Coast sheep

I do not have any livestock right now, but am planning to get enough to provide meat, milk, eggs etc for my family. I am very interested in the rarer breeds, primarily because I hate to think of them dying out. I see that the pineywoods and the gulf coast are both on the American Livestock Breeds Conservatory critical list. I have to commend anyone who takes an interest in saving these and other breeds. I am interested in the arapawa and san clemente goats, not for meat but to help replenish their numbers. Also interested in making products from their milk: milk, cheese, soap. As of yet I have not found any for sale. I am looking into navajo-churro sheep and several rarer chicken breeds. So far I am just in the research stage, but I'll get there.


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RE: Pineywoods cattle and Gulf Coast sheep

Would like a contact number to discuss the Gulf Coast Native Sheep.


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RE: Pineywoods cattle and Gulf Coast sheep

I just ran across your post and would like info on your pineywoods. Just wondering what strain do you have and have many do you currently have? What part of N Florida are you in? I have some Barnes pineys.


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