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Springtime

Posted by indymom76 5 (My Page) on
Sun, Apr 8, 12 at 2:49

Hi everyone-I hope everyone is doing well! I love seeing all of the pictures of all of your gardens waking up!! I went out the other day and took some pictures of the front yard-what a difference a couple of weeks makes in growth!! I added some pictures of the front yard flower gardens. Now, before anyone remarks, yes, there is a lot of grass. I am trying to methodically add one host garden at a time, so before the DH knows it, I will have dominated both front and back yards with hosta.

The pictures I have added is one of the beds kind of shaped as a kidney-I have lancifolia (inherited lots of these with the house) and in the middle is a NOID, great expectations, June, Praying Hands, Big Daddy, and Red October.

Another picture I took was at the front walkway-I weeded it and it looks tons better with hosta and phlox.

The flower bed near the garage of the house has many different varieties-Hanky Panky, Blazing Saddles, Blue Mouse Ears, just to name a few, but many are just starting to peek through.

There is also a burning bush I cut waaay back with hosta lining the bottom part of it-I think this year those hosta have really filled out the way I envisioned them to.

I will get some pictures of the back yard this week-I have been working hard to clear it out for my "dream garden" area. As I clear away the ground cover, I am finding really nice soil; I bought a Liberty (could become my new favorite hosta) and the Sagae I planted back there last year has come back this spring strong. I also planted tattoo, blue dolphin, and Invincible back there-they all look great! I'm also getting a feel for what is really planted in our backyard-as I've said before, many Mayapple, crocus, some daffodils, and many other perennials that I'd like to preserve and incorporate into the garden.

Thanks for reading my ramblings!! Take care!

Here is a link that might be useful: April 2012


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Springtime

Beautiful property, Mom. You've got a great palette from which to work. BTW, Burning Bush is invasive in our state. It's no longer allowed to be sold. I took one out two years ago and I'm still removing seedlings this Spring.

You've really got a great combination of sun and shade for Hosta. What kind of trees are anchoring those shade beds?

Steve


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RE: Springtime

Good morning, Steve! Thanks-we have a maple, we did have an ash-unfortunately, I think it has succumbed to the ash-borer disease; we also have near the kidney-shaped bed a crabapple tree, with many other trees in our neighbors yard that help shade it, near the garage, we have a shagbark hickory near the garage garden and a black walnut out back with many others I'm still trying to figure out!


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RE: Springtime

It is a lovely property, Mom. Don't think I ever saw a grass that green before. Lush. What a great way to start the growing season.


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RE: Springtime

It's amazing how much further your hostas are than ours, and you're only 5 hours south of me!

Lovely landscape.

Gesila


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RE: Springtime

Hi Mom,

What a great palette of land to work with for hostas. I'm also surprised at how far ahead some of your hostas are. My largest so far is only 5 or so inches high and leaves not unfurled yet.

Scott


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RE: Springtime

Steve-Wow, I can't believe that about the burning bush-I just really whacked it back this year; it probably stood about twelve feet high, but was losing all the leaves on the bottom. I love how smart plants are sometimes and how they can accommodate like that.

Moccasin-thanks!! I do like the grass-it looks pretty good-for now!

gesila-I know-I'm really surprised as well. I was looking at pictures from last year and we seem to be at least 2-3 weeks ahead of where hosta were at this time last year. It's amazing what a few hours can do, isn't it?

Hi Johnsp-I'm surprised as well-like I said I feel we're about 2-3 weeks ahead of schedule! Thanks-I'm having fun designing my vision into real life!

I did add some photos of some hosta from my walk through the yard today!

Here is a link that might be useful: Hosta Garden


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RE: Springtime

My burning bush, 30 years old, is not invasive. It probably becomes invasive when you never prune it, and it can give a lot of seeds. I cut mine back to 2 ft high last year. Every time I cut it back the leaves become twice the previous size, will not bloom then. I pull all seedlings.
Nice property!
Bernd


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RE: Springtime

This is from the state of Pennsylvania Department of Forestry on "Winged Eunonomous" also known as Burning Bush.

EFFECTS OF INVASION: Winged euonymus is a threat to mature forests and successional fields and woodlands because it out-competes native species. It is adaptable to various environmental conditions although it generally does not do well in very dry areas. It grows well in a variety of soil types and pH levels, has no serious pest problems in North America, and most importantly of all, is tolerant of full shade. It has invaded moist forested sites creating dense thickets that can shade out native herbs and shrubs.

REPRODUCTION AND METHODS OF DISPERSAL: Seed production is prodigious; many germinate where they fall close to the mother plant creating dense beds of seedlings. Others are spread by birds that are attracted to the seeds by their nutritious, fleshy, red covering (aril). Seeds dispersed this way germinate easily and spread the infestation rapidly. Wide usage of this a popular landscape ornamental increases the probability that more will escape from cultivation.

Even if you aren't seeing seedlings in your landscape, or clean them up, it doesn't mean that the birds aren't distributing the seeds elsewhere. I think I read somewhere that someone at the University of Connecticut hybridized one that is sterile.

Steve


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RE: Springtime

You are probably right, Steve. Here in NY state the plants are being sold.
Bernd


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RE: Springtime

Since I got certified as a Backyard Habitat, I'm more aware of plants that are not native and do not give the protection or food for wildlife even in my suburban space.

I got a book by Douglas W. Tallamy, BRINGING NATURE HOME: HOW YOU CAN SUSTAIN WILLIFE WITH NATIVE PLANTS. It is great, and I am especially pleased with the increase in my butterfly population. Then, there are other insects which prey on harmful insects, and I'm careful about any insecticide I use.

This last weekend, we fledged nests of Carolina wrens and Eastern bluebirds, and it felt so satisfying to send them out to eat spiders and other similar things--hopefully the awful deer ticks.


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