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Police blotter

Posted by david52 z5CO (My Page) on
Sat, Feb 16, 13 at 15:25

from the third highest income zipcode in the country, where average home prices are 4.8 mil. 94027, Atherton, CA.

excerpts:

A pedestrian was reported not to be doing anything strange other than wearing black pants and a white dress shirt while walking at an odd hour.

A man in a white truck reported to be whistling and possibly casing the area was contacted and determined to be seeking his dog.

A woman told police someone was at her door and that when she asked who it was, no one answered. Police responded and determined the stranger outside had delivered a package.

Here is a link that might be useful: many more at the link


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Police blotter

Oh, the travails of the rich.


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RE: Police blotter

I live in a pretty affluent suburb, almost no violent crime but some property crimes. I'm always amused by the fools that report things like cash, iPads, and jewelry stolen out if parked cars - unlocked parked cars.


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I live in the Bay Area and when I look at the Police Blotter article in the paper most days, the entries in very wealthy areas are mostly ridiculous. What a shame some of these people feel threatened by innocuous circumstances and what a waste of police resources if they do indeed go out to check on such reports.


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What it shows is that paranoia prevails and absurd thought processes abound with those that have money and that there is no common sense in these people.

A pedestrian was reported not to be doing anything strange other than wearing black pants and a white dress shirt while walking at an odd hour.

some people like to walk around late at night, IE "odd hour" after coming home from an evening out. hence the dress shirt and black pants but no tie.

A man in a white truck reported to be whistling and possibly casing the area was contacted and determined to be seeking his dog.

Casing the area? That's why he was whistling to draw attention to himself.

A woman told police someone was at her door and that when she asked who it was, no one answered. Police responded and determined the stranger outside had delivered a package.

Ever heard of a "peep hole" in your door. That's what they are for. Look out the peep hole and you would see that the package you where waiting for was delivered and unless a signature is needed, they just dump the package at the door after knocking on the door or ringing a bell. They don't wait for you to open it and say hello and thank you. the just dump and run. too busy delivering packages to stick around and chat.

How sad these people's lives must be.


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But then again, not all things laughable are relegated to the high end...

Here is a link that might be useful: Hmmmmmmm


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  • Posted by momj47 7A..was 6B (My Page) on
    Sat, Feb 16, 13 at 16:04

What's so sad is how isolated these people are, from even the outside of their homes,and most certainly, from their neighbors.


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TN cops in body armor tell old woman to remove marijuana bumper sticker (was a buckeye leaf)

Police in Tennessee, in a black SUV and in full body armor, pulled over an elderly couple because they had a “suspicious” marijuana-ish (or so the cops claimed) bumper sticker on their car, that in fact was a buckeye leaf �" the couple are Ohio State Buckeye fans. The cops then ordered the couple to remove the bumper sticker.

Don't get me started on our creeping police state and tasers.


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  • Posted by rosie NE Georgia 7A/B (My Page) on
    Sat, Feb 16, 13 at 16:38

A long time ago now I worked as a volunteer in the LAPD's central communications department, assisting on the 911 lines. (No, I didn't work them alone, but the Gamewell to take calls from the city buses and other police precincts, yes.)

In any case, one night we had a 911 call from a very nice, and actually quite intelligent women in Brentwood who was just shocked and rattled to see a rat in her back yard. She knew this trespasser definitely didn't belong in Brentwood so called 911. "You saw a RAT, ma'am?" Half a dozen officers moved in to offer various questions to ask to determine what level of response would be appropriate. Two-legged or four-legged rat"? Is the rat packing? And so on.


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Oh, lawdy, lawdy! It's so difficult to be filthy rich! Scary, too!


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I used to work in the 'golden triangle' area of Beverly Hills.

One morning a late model Porsche was stalled in an intersection, and the BH police arrived. I was expecting to see a ticket issued as is customary with the LAPD. Instead the two policemen left their car, pushed the Porsche out ot the intersection (with the driver steering), and then left the scene. Angelena that I am, I was astonished at the sight.


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My favorites are the huge, SWAT team "drug busts" on little old ladies growing poppies.

Here is a link that might be useful: example of the genre at the link


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Those types of things are identical to what my neighborhood is on the lookout for every single day. we know who belongs and who is new and newness is reason for being alert or contacting our beat cop. And we are not in a top three wealth zip code...not that wealth matters.

I don't expect rural dwellers to have this same appreciation. Although, now that I think about it, isn't the reason most of you own guns so that you can "protect your stuff and families?"

David, why did you mention the wealth of the zip code? Why did that matter?


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Posted by jodik 5 (My Page) on
Sat, Feb 16, 13 at 17:10

Oh, lawdy, lawdy! It's so difficult to be filthy rich! Scary, too!

*

Actually, those stories about the people in the "highest income zip codes" calling police for stupid reasons have nothing to do with being "filthy rich."

They have to do with being stupid--just like the "poor" that call 911 when fast food restaurants are out of McNuggets and Burger King won't make it their way, when some people targue with their spouses, and whena man takes a little sky colored pill and the effect doesn't wear off.

Making fun of these types of calls that happened to be made by poor people because they were poor would be considered egregious by many.

At what income level is their stupidity no longer part of the equation and at what income level are insults about these people no longer acceptable?

Stupid isn't about one's income.


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"Stupid isn't about one's income."

I concur; and that pretty much takes care of the OP. No offense, David.

We wouldn't want to offend anyone, rich or poor, just because they are clueless, right?

Anyway, in Wisconsin we have a law against that:

"1. PROHIBITED ACTS. No person shall:

...b. Intentionally dial the emergency telephone number "911" ... for purposes of communication not relating to the reporting of an actual emergency.
...

3. PENALTY. Any person violating the provisions of this section shall, upon conviction, be subject to a forfeiture of not less than $50 nor more than $300, together with the costs of prosecution, and upon default of payment be imprisoned in the county jail or house of correction not less than 2 days nor more than 12 days."

I sure hope it is enforced regardless of zip code.



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There appears to be a false impression that because it was an affluent area that the residents were smart. Just because they have money does not guarantee they will be intelligent.

A woman told police someone was at her door and that when she asked who it was, no one answered. Police responded and determined the stranger outside had delivered a package.

That sounds like somebody's arm candy. He did not marry that for brains.


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"A woman whose finger was caught in the drain was reported to be conscious and breathing"

So the Altherton Police have a sense of humor.

"A resident worried that a noisy hawk in a tree was in some sort of distress. When authorities arrived, the hawk was quiet and enjoying dinner."


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"A woman told police someone was at her door and that when she asked who it was, no one answered. Police responded and determined the stranger outside had delivered a package."

Actually, I don't think that's a good example of stupidity on the part of the caller. Not all packages are harmless, and there could be cause for alarm if the package is unexpected, or if the caller has been having issues which might cause him/her to be suspicious.


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Actually, I don't think that's a good example of stupidity on the part of the caller. Not all packages are harmless, and there could be cause for alarm if the package is unexpected, or if the caller has been having issues which might cause him/her to be suspicious.

*

Of course.

Some people have short memories and make assumptions they have no business making.

Remember government officials, elected representatives and businessmen and businesswomen being targeted with "white powder" packages and envelopes?

That has happened, and continues to happen.

There simply is no way to make a correlation that people in any particular zip code should or should not be making certain 911 calls without more information.

There certainly is no basis on which to ridicule people or to make assumptions about the level of their intellect because of their income and the value of their home.


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My favorite police blotter is in the Arcata (California) Eye. I doubt there is a funnier, wackier blotter on the planet. If there is, please let me know ASAP.


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We get some good ones in the Four Corners Free Press - the reporter makes a real effort. But unfortunately you have to pop 75 cents for the printed copy, they don't reproduce it online. Its the reason many people buy the paper.


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I wonder what the paranoid types -- you know, the ones who are busy inspecting who 'belongs' in the neighborhood and who doesn't -- would do when living in an area where there is a large influx of out-of-area visitors during warm weather and vacation months. Would there be a struggle between merchants trying to attract more visitors to retail, dining, and entertainment establishments, and those residents who want to be sure only those that 'belong' are using the public streets and sidewalks. Pffft!


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"I wonder what the paranoid types -- you know, the ones who are busy inspecting who 'belongs' in the neighborhood and who doesn't -- would do when living in an area where there is a large influx of out-of-area visitors during warm weather and vacation months"

Live someplace else, I would think.

I don't see anything odd about wanting to being aware of one's surroundings, and that includes (most importantly) other people. If one doesn't mind (or enjoys) not knowing who is around them, the city is probably the place for you; close quarters, etc.

If you feel more comfortable knowing those you are in intimate contact with, i.e., living with, choose a community where neighbors are well, neighbors. I make a point of getting to know the new neighbors and staying friendly with the ones I already know. I live in a cul-de-sac. If someone pulls into my yard, I want to know who they are and why they are in my home. If I look out the kitchen window and there is someone on the pier, I want to know who.

If there is a package at my door, I want to know why. That doesn't seem paranoid to me, it's a privacy and safety issue. To me. I'm comfortable saying there's a chance others feel this way also, and I think that's okay.


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We have relatives, friends and customers that live in nice areas on the outskirts of a high crime area where the local paper terminated the "Police Blotter" and "Sex Offender Relocation" as it was making the area look bad.

Facebook, word of mouth, law enforcement connections and other forms of human networking are often the only way to find out what's happening in the area.

One time there were numerous daytime home invasions/robberies of occupied homes, commercial/residential break-ins and armed robberies within the course of a few days, however there were no reports in the paper. Weeks later the paper reported that they were looking for several suspects wanted for questioning for various incidents.

Because of the high crime rates, high number of drug users/sellers and high number of sex offenders, many residents are very paranoid. One of our relatives - a law enforcement officer in the area responds to numerous reports of suspicious pedestrians, parked vehicles, vehicles circling the blocks, loitering, trespassing etc.

Oddly enough, when he responds to calls, many suspects aren't casing the neighborhood, however they're often in possession of drugs, open container, they have outstanding tickets and warrants, or they're charged with DUI, or operating a vehicle with no driver's license or no insurance, registration, inspection etc.


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If there is a package at my door, I want to know why. That doesn't seem paranoid to me, it's a privacy and safety issue. To me. I'm comfortable saying there's a chance others feel this way also, and I think that's okay.

Someone we know used to case out and rip off properties in vans with numerous different removable magnetic signs, plus they had numerous different uniforms and fake IDs.

They'd often pose as a delivery, or catering service.

This now retired pro that said as long as you look like you're supposed to be there, you'll rarely draw suspicion.


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Our local paper recently changed the format for the blotter and 'court news'. Before, they just listed the events chronologically.

Now they have categories: DWI, Assault, etc. Booooring.


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I keep wondering how I made it to retirement age without something horrible happening to me.

You know how I treat packages at the door?

I look out the window (my computer faces the street) and see a package delivery truck pull up.

So I walk over to the door (about 8 feet from my computer), open it, and wait for the package guy to get there. He hands it directly over to my hands. We sometimes exchange a few pleasantries in the process.

I accept the package even if I'm not expecting one. I figure if it is not something I ordered, it is probably something that my son ordered.

I double check the name on the package and if it is addressed to me, I rip it open in anticipation of something good inside.

Like I said--how did I get safely to retirement age. I should have been blown up or inhaled anthrax or lethel option of your choice decades ago for being so lax and trusting about packages delivered to my door.

But nothing untoward ever happened--except I occasionally needed to get a refund for damaged goods or wrong item delivered.

Kate


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We've lived in areas where crime was so low that when they still had a local paper, or the local paper still had a police blotter, they'd report things like stolen garden produce, or complaints of barking dogs, skateboarders on sidewalks and other petty stuff.


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Ours still reports stolen bicycles and complaints about barking dogs.

When there is a 'real crime' like a robbery, thats a whole article with witness and victim interviews.


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Recently one of our service vans and several vehicles owned by residents in the area where we were working were victims of vandalism and/or theft - broken mirrors, lights, keyed paintjobs, 2 smashed windows, stolen possessions etc.

We`were lucky - our customer's son spotted one of the vandals when he was trying to rip the windshield wipers off our service van.

There was nothing about it in the paper.

One of the local papers also started censoring negative editorials, plus stopped allowing commentary on news articles.

Before they stopped allowing commentary, they censored commentary as well.


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RE: Police blotter

That sounds like somebody's arm candy. He did not marry that for brains.

Reminds me of the widow who adopted the Chinese baby with her wealthy husband. When the husband died, she dumped the kid on an agency who re-adopted the kid to a couple where the kid was being raised. Couple of years later the couple discovered that the kid had part of a $250 million estate coming to her. They sued and after a number of appeals, finally won.

Someone's arm candy who was not married for compassion.

-Ron-

Here is a link that might be useful: Christine Svenningsen


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RE: Police blotter

That sounds like somebody's arm candy. He did not marry that for brains.

*

That sounds like a starter wife dumped for arm candy! ;)


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RE: Police blotter

  • Posted by ohiomom 3rdrockfromthesun (My Page) on
    Mon, Feb 18, 13 at 13:31

Well as a "city dweller" I don't know how I have made it to this ripe old age either, and I currently work in the "hood". But then I don't look at everyone as a potential assailant either.

The other day I was carrying empty milk cans (10 gallon size) out to the truck at work (going to the farm to be refilled) . A couple of young men held the door open and then offered to carry them to the truck.

Judging books by covers will usually cause you to miss out on a good story.


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"I wonder what the paranoid types -- you know, the ones who are busy inspecting who 'belongs' in the neighborhood and who doesn't -- would do when living in an area where there is a large influx of out-of-area visitors during warm weather and vacation months. Would there be a struggle between merchants trying to attract more visitors to retail, dining, and entertainment establishments, and those residents who want to be sure only those that 'belong' are using the public streets and sidewalks. Pffft!"

Why wonder, nancy. Just get the gumption up to ask. There just might be others in this country besides you who live with tourists.


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RE: Police blotter

get the gumption up to ask.

I did; you had no problem knowing which comments I addressed.

I see that you offered no hints as to how one can tell the difference between someone who 'belongs' and someone who doesn't.

You sounded sounded the paranoia alarm -- Those types of things are identical to what my neighborhood is on the lookout for every single day. we know who belongs and who is new and newness is reason for being alert or contacting our beat cop. -- long and long.

When someone criticizes those with firearms as living in fear, and then confesses to her own paranoia, I immediately think of glass houses and stones.

You rang the bell about who 'belongs' and who doesn't, and no amount of sarcasm will unring it.

In general I have problems with the idea of someone judging who 'belongs' on public streets and sidewalks.


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"A woman told police someone was at her door and that when she asked who it was, no one answered. Police responded and determined the stranger outside had delivered a package.

That sounds like somebody's arm candy. He did not marry that for brains."

Doesn't "arm candy" have to be um, appetizing looking? How do we know what the woman looked like? For that matter how do we know she's not the homeowner, with her own arm candy or not?

"he did not marry..." He who? Very sexist assumption there IMO.

Just sayin' ;D

--------

"I see that you offered no hints as to how one can tell the difference between someone who 'belongs' and someone who doesn't."

I've got a hint. I ask them who they are visiting.


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I've got a hint. I ask them who they are visiting.

So would you would be willing to ask this question of 20+ people per day on weekends? If you were to live in an area like mine that receives a lot of visitors - beach, dining, theater, garden and architectual tours, novelty of walking the 'walk streets' plus employees such as nannies, professional dog walkers, cleaning help, gardeners, and handymen - you would have a full schedule questioning those on foot. Not to mention irking the neighbors by questioning their family and friends coming for various gatherings.

You most likely would receive a few answers that it's none of your business.


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I'd bet more than a few, Nancy.


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A woman told police someone was at her door and that when she asked who it was, no one answered. Police responded and determined the stranger outside had delivered a package.

I guess the help had the day off? Poor thing had to actually open the door and retrieve the package all by themselves? Oh, the hardship!

They'd often pose as a delivery, or catering service.

Uh huh, and they actually deliver a package too? And ring the bell to let you know the package is there? Now those are some smart crooks! Do the ones posing as caterers cook you a meal too?


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From a local Police Blotter:

"Woman charged with endangering children for hiring strippers to perform at 16-year-old's birthday party

SOUTH GLENS FALLS " A 33-year-old woman is facing five misdemeanor charges for allegedly hiring strippers to perform at a 16-year-old’s birthday party.

According to South Glens Falls police, Judy H. Viger of Dimmick Road in Gansevoort organized, managed and paid for two “female adult entertainers” to perform “personal and intimate dances” for birthday party attendees at Spare Time Bowling Center. Five of the attendees were younger than 17, which led to Viger being charged with five counts of endangering the welfare of a child.

Police confirmed they were investigating the Nov. 3 party in mid-November after photos from the party " at least one showing a scantily clad, tattooed woman clinging upside down to a seated teen " surfaced on social networking sites.

At that time, South Glens Falls Police Chief Kevin Judd said “several kids at the party got lap dances.”

Also in November, Saratoga County District Attorney James A. Murphy III said 80 adults and teens were at the party, which was held in a room in the bowling alley with floor-to-ceiling windows covered with brown paper.

The dancers were from a company called Tops In Bottoms, he said.

Viger is scheduled to appear March 7 in Moreau Town Court.

South Glens Falls police say no further arrests are expected from the investigation. "

Here is a link that might be useful: LINK


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RE: Police blotter

Posted by jillinnj (My Page) on
Tue, Feb 19, 13 at 8:46

A woman told police someone was at her door and that when she asked who it was, no one answered. Police responded and determined the stranger outside had delivered a package.

I guess the help had the day off? Poor thing had to actually open the door and retrieve the package all by themselves? Oh, the hardship!

*

Thanks for posting.

That post explains a lot.


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RE: Police blotter

That post explains a lot.

Yes, it does...that some don't understand sarcasm.


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RE: Police blotter

Posted by jillinnj (My Page) on
Tue, Feb 19, 13 at 11:48

That post explains a lot.

Yes, it does...that some don't understand sarcasm.

*

Another post that is an example of deflection.

I've got it--it all makes sense.


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RE: Police blotter

demifloyd wrote,

Another post that is an example of deflection.

I've got it--it all makes sense.

What happened? I thought you were signing off.

I guess you didn't stick the flounce.


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RE: Police blotter

In a nice little town near where I live, about half of the police calls are for securty alarms going off.

Then there are the speeders, ticketed more often if they live outside the city limits, & the burglaries, which happen more often in the summer months, when people leave their garage doors up & the kids aren't in school.

A car went off a bridge one time, & it made the front page.


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RE: Police blotter

A couple who live in the historic and most affluent part of our neighborhood are avid gardeners. We have deer throughout the area. The husband told me that his wife, tired of losing plants and unable by law to DO anything about the deer, once called 911 in the early hours of the morning. She said, "Vandals in brown leather are in my garden!" The house was soon surrounded by cops with weapons drawn.

I think the city let that one go, but made it clear that they didn't want any more 'funny' 911 calls from that address. It wasn't on the Blotter, but then our local paper doesn't print anything that would reflect poorly on the town! (sigh)


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I'm wondering how many of these people are elderly and suffering from the early stages of dementia or a more run-of-the-mill "caution" that results from failing eyesight and hearing. It sounds a lot like the irrationally-perceived threats that dementia patients imagine.

We can all exchange stories of elderly folks who believe that people are breaking into their house and stealing their shoes and light bulbs (personal experience). Or, if they hear a noise outside, like the neighbors bringing in their garbage cans, they think someone is trying to break into their house. It's sad really, but pretty annoying to the cops and people who are being questioned about doing the most mundane things.


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Elvis: "I've got a hint. I ask them who they are visiting."

Nancy: "So would you would be willing to ask this question of 20+ people per day on weekends?

If 20+ people a day showed up in my property it would be highly unusual--unless I invited them or my next door neighbor was having a garage sale or graduation party, and these folks overshot the correct driveway, or maybe the house was on fire. That would bring out some people, I suppose.

There are plenty of situations (besides mine) where it is appropriate to be concerned about the presence (and welfare) of strangers. Around here there's a good change they are simply lost.

Of course, we don't call 911 for that sort of thing.


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RE: Police blotter

elvis, you gone far afield from my original question. How does one tell who 'belongs' and who doesn't when you live in a neighborhood that has many visitors? I gave you a typical range of people who would be in my area, and somehow you've taken off on a tanget about your little neck of the woods and who may or may not have a garage sale.

Rampant paranoia about who may 'belong' in an area is just that - rampant paranoia. Here's the paranoid statement that started the side discussion:

... we know who belongs and who is new and newness is reason for being alert or contacting our beat cop.

Absolutely meaningless in my area, and probably for many others as well.


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•Posted by nancy_in_venice_ca SS24 z10 CA (My Page) on Tue, Feb 19, 13 at 21:25

elvis, you gone far afield from my original question. How does one tell who 'belongs' and who doesn't when you live in a neighborhood that has many visitors?"

Your "original question"? I don't believe you ever posed the question you have posted right here (above). if you had (you didn't) I wouldn't have volunteered an answer because I'm not qualified to.

•Posted by jmc01 (My Page) on Sat, Feb 16, 13 at 19:37

"Those types of things are identical to what my neighborhood is on the lookout for every single day. we know who belongs and who is new and newness is reason for being alert or contacting our beat cop. And we are not in a top three wealth zip code...not that wealth matters."

A couple days later, you addressed that post for the first time, as far as I can see:

•Posted by nancy_in_venice_ca SS24 z10 CA (My Page) on Mon, Feb 18, 13 at 19:58

"get the gumption up to ask.
I did; you had no problem knowing which comments I addressed.

I see that you offered no hints as to how one can tell the difference between someone who 'belongs' and someone who doesn't.

You sounded sounded the paranoia alarm -- Those types of things are identical to what my neighborhood is on the lookout for every single day. we know who belongs and who is new and newness is reason for being alert or contacting our beat cop. -- long and long.

When someone criticizes those with firearms as living in fear, and then confesses to her own paranoia, I immediately think of glass houses and stones.

You rang the bell about who 'belongs' and who doesn't, and no amount of sarcasm will unring it."

This last paragraph of yours jumps out at me:

"In general I have problems with the idea of someone judging who 'belongs' on public streets and sidewalks."

i didn't see any judgment there; only awareness.



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I don't believe you ever posed the question you have posted right here (above).

Wrong.

See: Posted by nancy_in_venice_ca SS24 z10 CA (My Page) on Sun, Feb 17, 13 at 16:14


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Okey dokey, Nancy. Here's your post:

•Posted by nancy_in_venice_ca SS24 z10 CA (My Page) on Sun, Feb 17, 13 at 16:14

I wonder what the paranoid types -- you know, the ones who are busy inspecting who 'belongs' in the neighborhood and who doesn't -- would do when living in an area where there is a large influx of out-of-area visitors during warm weather and vacation months. Would there be a struggle between merchants trying to attract more visitors to retail, dining, and entertainment establishments, and those residents who want to be sure only those that 'belong' are using the public streets and sidewalks. Pffft!

•Posted by nancy_in_venice_ca SS24 z10 CA (My Page) on Tue, Feb 19, 13 at 21:25
elvis, you gone far afield from my original question. How does one tell who 'belongs' and who doesn't when you live in a neighborhood that has many visitors?"

"Your "original question"? I don't believe you ever posed the question you have posted right here (above). if you had (you didn't) I wouldn't have volunteered an answer because I'm not qualified to."

Now you say "wrong", and refer back to your post. The question that you state you asked thus: "How does one tell who 'belongs' and who doesn't when you live in a neighborhood that has many visitors?" was never asked. If fact I don't even see a question mark in your post of 2/17 @ 16:14. You said you "wonder what the paranoid types would do if..." and you said "would there be a struggle between merchants trying to attract more visitors to retail, dining, and entertainment establishments, and those residents who want to be sure only those that 'belong' are using the public streets and sidewalks. Pffft!"

You didn't actually ask a question. If you see the statement which begins with "would" and ends with a period, then "Pffft!", as a question, then the question was whether there would be a struggle. Not as you said at 21:25 on 2/19 "...my original question. How does one tell who 'belongs' and who doesn't when you live in a neighborhood that has many visitors?"

So that's that. I don't care about you admitting you are wrong; I've explained my attitude about that.


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With no help from me, I noticed that 2 police cars were on my block this afternoon escorting 2 pedestrian men out/off my street. The men were carrying snow shovels and, yes, we got a dumping of snow last night. One man clearly went willingly, the other appeared to be a bit resistant but he did leave.

Separately, there have been incidents over the last 1-2 months of pedestrians with snow shovels robbing senior citizens.

I'm glad the police did what they did. Somehow, it's pretty clear who doesn't belong.


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