Return to the Hot Topics Forum | Post a Follow-Up

 o
So, is she a yahoo?

Posted by jerzeegirl 9 (My Page) on
Thu, Feb 28, 13 at 18:19

Marissa Mayer the new CEO of Yahoo has rescinded telecommuting in her attempt to "save her company". She has issued an ultimatum - come in to work or quit. It will clearly affect working moms more than anyone else, but it may not be an unreasonable request. What do you think about this?

Here is a link that might be useful: source


Follow-Up Postings:

 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

Having managed a large staff in a corporate environment , I can tell you first hand the notion of telecommuting is not an easy one to come to grips with.

There are many factors to consider, the nature of the job, the benefits to the team of face to face communication , the ability of each member to grow and develop, the gains in efficiency when there is no travel time, quality of life for the employee and must importantly the ability of the employee to manage telecommuting in a responsible way.

Not every job, and most certainly not every person , is a good candidate for telecommuting. Each situation needs to be assessed on it's own merits.


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

Chase, your response lays out the issues very reasonably. I can't telecommute--I'm a teacher--but one of my daughters is able to do this one day a week. I know it is just one anecdote, but she says she gets so much done when it's just her, her computer, and her phone to keep her in touch but enabling her to work without interruption.
No absolute answers from me, but this is an important issue.


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

Pidge, one day a week can be manageable in many "corporate" type jobs.....not all but many. It's the 3-5 day a week telecommuters that can be a serious challenge.

One day a week can be very productive.

One thing I learned quickly though is if someone wants to work from home the same day every week there is usually a personal reason behind it. Not to say that's a bad thing but there needs to be an open discussion with regards to the reason.

I had one employee who wanted to work at home every Wednesday because she wanted to help her sister out with day care.....not happenning.


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

The biggest problem as I see it is that telecommuting helps women stay in the workforce after they have had children. Without the ability to telecommute, many woman would have to leave the workforce to raise their kids and then they would find themselves looking for jobs when they are in their 40s. That means they have to start from scratch and most likely with lower salaries.


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

JZ.....working from home may make life easier for a working Mom but that must be balanced with the effect on her job performance and the expected outcomes she is being paid to deliver.

Additionally the "rights" of all employees must be part of the equation. I don't mean this in an inflammatory way, I myself was a working Mom, but being a Mom does not mean an employee should have benefits or privileges not extended to those without children.


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

Yahoo has a reputation of employees abusing the telecommuting privilege. Mayer gets credit for shutting it down. Apple - work in the office. Google - strongly encourages work in the office. My industry (not just my employer) - work in the office with a rare one-off to work at home.

Jerzee, have you EVER seen an example of this? I haven't. Not once in all my years working.

"Without the ability to telecommute, many woman would have to leave the workforce to raise their kids and then they would find themselves looking for jobs when they are in their 40s."


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

Well, actually yes. My DD telecommutes two days a week. Her employers were delighted to accommodate her to make sure she stays with the company. She has a nanny who comes in even when she is at home so she doesn't actually have to do much with the kids.

Also, when my company closed the office I was working for, they wanted me to stay to support a couple of the other offices. They were the ones who suggested telecommuting. I didn't like it much because I like the social contact part of the job, but they were thrilled because I got a lot done and of course I worked around the clock because I enjoy the work.


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

Chase, I agree. I have telecommuted and worked from home as well as supervised those that did. It all depends on the situation and the person. Not everyone is self-motivated to effectively work at home.

That said she now has to recognize and address the child care needs of her employees and allow them to find alternative arrangments if she isn't going to provide them onsite. It will be interesting to see what she does considering she is going to have a nursery for her own at the office.


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

So Mayer had a nursery built next to her office and brings the baby and nanny to work and says you can do the same...

Bad bad policy to make it a blanket ban and not case by case. What decade are we in? For many our mo Ike devices connect us to work 24/7 already. Obviously, this doesn't apply to every job but half of downtown a manhattan telecommutes at least o e day a week.

Multiple studies show telecommuting and flex hours is more productive.

I also hate that women must live in a mans world and it is framed that way. We can be equal but do it it a woman's multi tasking way.

Yahoo has more problems than this! She could have been a real maverick in this area.


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

I have worked in the office and I worked from home for 20 years, I worked more hours working from home than when I worked in the office.

When we got a female VP she never understood the "work from home" she was always thinking someone was not working hard enough. She tried to do what Yahoo is doing and lost a lot of employees and within a year she was let go. Work suffered, she went over budget and lost experienced employees. We went back to our homes. It is an added operations cost just so you can look at someone 8 hours a day because you do not feel if you cannot see them working they are not working.

I could see it being a problem 30 years ago but technology has developed so much you can literally see your employee if you just have to look at their face every day. Every document is electronic there is no need other than being a Mommy boss.

I am aware every job cannot be done from home but Yahoo and the reasons she is giving is not a very good reason in my opinion. Emergencies and fast moving stories require close contact. Video conference call is a tool developed for those times. Yahoo is a internet communication firm for goodness sake what kind of backward thinking is going on in her head I have no idea.


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

JZ....not sure how the example of your daughter is an example of women who would have to leave the workplace if they were not able to telecommute. Why would she have to stop working if she could not work from home?

I an not against working from home but there are many, many factors that play in. It must be looked at on a case by case basis.


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

She could have been a real maverick in this area.

I agree. I don't know all the details, but working from home can be effective and it certainly helps some people enjoy their job (and their life) more. It's not for everyone, but that doesn't mean it's for no one.


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

Not working for that company & knowing what the environment is I have no idea if it's necessary or not. It doesn't seem so cut and dry.
In companies that have multiple offices in different cities a single person may do the same job for all of them & it is just as easy to do it from home as say a throne room style set up.

This post was edited by labrea on Thu, Feb 28, 13 at 20:52


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

Marquest, trust me having managed a very large staff of professionals for many years.....not everyone has the work ethic or the mind set to work effectively, efficiently and honestly at home. I believe you did but I'll bet my bottom dollar you also knew of many who did not.

Additionally there are some jobs, many jobs that require a face to face team effort.

Again I will say...each situation must be judged based on the work and individual.


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

I agree with Jerzee, and think this may be an especially good idea for a new mother nursing... if her job can be fulfilled in this manner.

Long ago, or so it seems, I did some work from home for an investigating firm. It was quite productive to close myself in a home office, and work using phone and computer. I was able to get quite a lot done without interruption, and still manage the household.

Of course, not everyone is a good candidate for this type of work, and I do think some face to face time is important to the health of a company and its employees.


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

"Emergencies and fast moving stories require close contact"

Take a look at Yahoo's home page right now. Every single article was written by a non-Yahoo news source. What emergency requires such close contact that ABC News, Reuters etc can't provide it.

"Yahoo is a internet communication firm for goodness sake what kind of backward thinking is going on in her head I have no idea."

Funny, Yahoo's mission statement sure reads differently from that. Yahoo does not consider itself an internet communication company. Mayer's job is to rescue a failing company. and it was failing for reasons. i wish her the best of luck!


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

chase: My daughter telecommutes two days because she wants to be home for her two sons in the early years of their lives. It was strictly her idea of being a good mother and I commend her for it. I didn't do it when she was little and I am sorry I didn't - there was no such thing at telecommuting in the dark ages.


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

Perfectly said, Esh.

To your point Chase, the fact she made it a blanket policy is throwing out the baby with the bath water. Very poor prescident I feel she is setting after breaking through as a pregnant woman to new mother.


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

Sorry but there are also single women, men, fathers, women with no children involved. Moms aren't special in this equation...........that ought to get me in some trouble ....but they aren't.


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

Sorry, that is "old" thinking. Having rejoined the workforce after spending time home with my children, I have fou d it much more flexible to family life...but believe me that doesn't mean I get off easy...if anything I work harder because it is incorporated into my family life but because it is bendable, I have never been happier or more productive.

No moms are not "special" but people are and whatever their family unit may look like. We are not soldiers.


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

Working from home a scheduled number of days per month has worked splendidly for me over the years -- no collegial distractions, no commute fatigue, and I work best in total silence.

However, I'm not completely swayed by the arguments for a special dispensation for young mothers -- if someone stays home to "work" but is actually taking care of kids, why is that OK?

I just finished a stint of taking almost full-time care of a family member's child for the past 2 weeks, and it's incredibly exhausting and distracting. No way could I have gotten quality work done during those days!


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

Sorry to be difficult jz but you said your daughter had a nanny even when she is working from home "so she doesn't actually have to do much with the kids."

I understand her desire to be closer to her kids in their early years ..What I don't understand is why she would HAVE to stop working if she could not telecommute. Seems to me it would be a matter of choice given she is paying a nanny regardless.

Not trying to be argumentative , really I'm not...just saying I think the issue of telecommuting is often seen only as it relates to the the personal needs of the employee and it's way more complicated than that.


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

Multiple studies show telecommuters are more productive and I do get it jerrzee. 100% and I do know in my industry the telecommuting can be done during non traditional office hours which can work very well.


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

More productive than what? In what industry, in what jobs?

Not so....it depends entirely on the worker and the work.

I'm only going to get myself in trouble here so I'm out of the conversation exceot to say. I have had years of experience with this issue ,over a base of hundreds of employees , and the number of employees who are abusing the privilege to work at home is huge and usually at the expense of their co-workers.

Many, many do it well.......and many don't so that why I say it must be looked at on a case by case basis taking into consideration the nature if the work, the needs of the team and the characteristics of the employee.

And that's not old thinking it's new thinking......the experiments of having everyone working from home have not worked as well as those wanting to work from home would have us think.

This post was edited by chase on Thu, Feb 28, 13 at 22:07


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

She stayed home primarily because she wanted to nurse the kids when they were babies. She wouldn't have had to stop working but she probably would have because she wanted to be there with the kids. Her company is more than happy to let her telecommute because they really like her work - I think it was the company that suggested it.


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

Marissa Mayer's job title is "CEO", not "Chief Promoter of Work/Life Balance".

The 2 have nothing to do with each other.


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

I think that is already agreed upon, Chase.

This is backwards thinking and I do t think she will attract the best in her industry with this policy. Many think it is simply a back door lay off.


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

Well perhaps she shouldn't have had a nursery built right next to her office which I am certain goes a long way in promoting her work-life balance.


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

I edited my post between several posts ..sorry should have posted a new post


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

I edited my post between several posts ..sorry should have posted a new post


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

I am a mom and I work from home and go into the office 1 day a week for about 5 hours. When my son was a baby and until he started kindergarten he was at the sitters house or daycare while I worked. I could not work when he was home - it was too distracting.

However, he did not need to be at daycare or the sitters for 8 hours at a time. 5 hours was tops for him being without me. Only because I was able to work from home did this work out. If I had to do the 8 to 5 drudge 5 days a week I would have quit.

I have friends with kids who get up a 5 AM and have the kids in daycare at 6:30 AM and don't pick them up until 6 PM. They are so stressed and exhausted because they are stuck to some dumb schedule dictated by their employer. And they still do work from home in the evening anyway.

I know not all jobs can be done from home and some people are not good candidates for working from home. My job is such that everything I do is on a strict deadline. I know it has to be completed by that deadline and I never miss the deadline. Nearly everything I do is done electronically and I communicate via email almost exclusively.

If I have a Drs appointment or volunteer at school I don't need to ask permission from some clueless boss who thinks if you show up at 8:10 you are a slacker (dealt with many of these types before).

I have been working this way for 10 years. I was able to nurse my son for 18 months and drive him to kindergarten everyday. I could not have done that when I was working in the city at a 8 to 5 job where office gossip, politics and pettiness ruined many of my days.

I feel badly for the people (men and women) who were working from home productively and now have lost that opportunity. Most likely those that abused the system will abuse it regardless of whether they work at home or in the office. I have seen people sleeping behind filing cabinets and drinking in the office. Some people are not good employees in the office or at home.


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

I have to say I am chuckling too thinking of how much content many of my fb friends put out during their working hours...

Truly, is case by case and unique to Industry and individual. Since we all agree on that, again why a blanket policy. It is really very regressive policy and they won't be able to compete.


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

Agree, Jerzee... and I think there should be an equal opportunity offered for childcare on premises... if there isn't already.


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

I agree there should not be a blanket policy but it may well be that she is bringing them all "in" to get a handle on the situation in order to develop a policy that works for both the company and the employee.

This woman it's not doing this just to be a " b....", she had an excellent reputation. There is an underlying problem she needs to get a grip on.


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

Why would you say being a "b....", ugh why perpetuate that sort of thing :(

Yes, the glass ceiling is often reinforced by women themselves.


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

  • Posted by ohiomom 3rdrockfromthesun (My Page) on
    Thu, Feb 28, 13 at 22:46

Can anyone name one single "male" CEO that has a nursery/nanny next door to his office?

Does Yahoo offer in-house day care facilities? Not that they are required to, but just wondering.

Yes some women (I doubt very many men) will have to make the decision whether or not to go "into the office" and get daycare for their children ... just like the rest of us have had to do over the years.

There are posters here on HT, and as Maggie said on FB, that post on social networking sites while at work, which I am sure their employers do not know about.

Yahoo has major problems, isn't she like the 3rd CEO in the last year or so?


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

Its all black and white to me. Obey MY rules or hit the highway. Its my signature on your paycheck.


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

I seem to recall that Yahoo has an on-site day-care facility. I have mixed feelings on the telecommuting issue. On the one hand, Yahoo has to turn itself around or everyone will be out of a job, making telecommuting a moot point. My guess would be that there eventually would be a balance where people are allowed to have some telecommuting days and some days where they are in-house.

This post was edited by tishtoshnm on Thu, Feb 28, 13 at 23:12


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

It sounds like this is part of a longstanding corporate culture problem there that was reflected in the productivity of the staff working at home that needed to be addressed. I think she might have taken an interim step before stopping it entirely.


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

Aside from abuse of liberal work privileges, as mentioned in the article, do we know what other issues the corporation has?


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

their issues have been in the media for years.


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

Yes, the glass ceiling is often reinforced by women themselves.

Maggie, I still fail to see how eliminating telecommuting is a purely gendered (i.e., sexist) step? I have as many male friends in silicon valley who telecommute as female.


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

I could be wrong, cp, but I thought that glass ceiling comment was in reference to the "b" word.


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

Maggie's comment was directed at me because I said that the CEO has a reason for doing this that she want doing it to be a "b....." Maggie took exception to that as it's her right.

In my mind it is no different than slamming her for having a nursery. One could take that as a put down of women in executive positions but I didn't because I understood the intent.

Perpetuating stereotypes can take many forms one being that women expect special treatment because they have children. It seems to me, based on what I have read here , that stereotype is acceptable while my reference to the fact she was not taking this action just to be mean is not....

I have lived the glass ceiling, I know what it's like to reach upper managemrnt level in a large corporation. To take one word out of all I said and translate that into me being a woman that helps perpetuate the glass ceiling may be your opinion but it is not who I am

This post was edited by chase on Fri, Mar 1, 13 at 7:56


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

Basically what the CEO did is that she has brought her house to work. She had the nursery built next to her office and that makes things very convenient for her. I can't blame her for wanting to make her life convenient. Unfortunately her employees will not get the same accommodation.

I think we have a choice as a society. Until they figure out a way for men to be pregnant, it will always be the woman's job to carry the child and, in most cases, to take care of the child in his or her earliest years. Should that disqualify a woman from the workplace; does she really have to choose between her career and her child. Is that really what we want to promote?

Telecommuting is simply a tool to keep good workers in the workplace. It is unlikely that a company would offer telecommuting if they did not trust that the worker was mature and knew his or her responsibilities toward the company. I believe that the CEO is revoking telecommuting because she feels that the corporate culture is not cohesive enough. This is her way of making the employees feel they are all in it together. It's kind of a punitive move - I will make you all hang with each other whether you like it or not.

So maybe the CEO is going to be cool with woman bringing their infants to work. Maybe she will be cool with a woman strapping on her hooter hider and nursing the kid at the conference table. If they want women in the workplace, they are going to have to make the accommodations somehow. It might make others uncomfortable but what's a mother to do?


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

I have had years of experience with this issue ,over a base of hundreds of employees , and the number of employees who are abusing the privilege to work at home is huge and usually at the expense of their co-workers.

Chase that is just bad employees. I had the same issue when I worked in a office.

I think of employment as you either have the skills to do the job or you do not. Working from home is a skill, if the employee does not have that skill then they need to seek employment elsewhere. It has nothing to do with whether they are in an office or in their home.

I do not have her job so I cannot say she is absolutely wrong but I think she should have looked at alternative solutions. She could have set up quarterly all staff meetings of a week or two. Group in house brainstorming month. What she is doing is drastic and disruptive in my opinion. As I stated above I saw this in practice and know what happened. Time will tell I am going to clip this topic to refer back later to see which of us had a crystal ball.


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

Having very little interest in keeping up with inner corporate issues at places like Yahoo, and little desire to spend much time delving into an investigation of such turmoil now, I thought perhaps someone in the know could give a quick, abridged version in twenty words or less, of what problems Yahoo has other than employee abuse of working from home, or the shorter hours many clock in for... no? If not, I'm assuming we're talking about what we can glean from the attached article above.

Jerzee, it's interesting you mention nursing at work... I just watched a program on how backward thinking American society is regarding the nursing of babies in public, and the strange taboo that surrounds the mammary gland. The female breast was not created as a play toy for our male counterparts, but as a necessary device in giving sustenance to our very young offspring. The program centered around a couple of women who were fired from their positions for supporting a local organization that used photos of them nursing in a campaign promoting breastfeeding. The companies doing the firing used such excuses as "they didn't like the media attention", and some of the comments from the public were downright offensive, not to mention extremely ignorant. The photos were very tasteful, to say the least, and were clearly about nursing, and not about anything sexual.

Getting back to the current issue... if the CEO can comfortably work with her offspring nearby, the same considerations should be made for other parents that are employees.

I can clearly see the benefits of bringing everyone together for cohesion to establish solutions that might fix any problems... though it would depend on what those issues are.


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

Jodi all I have seen is the memo that is attached. From that info it just appears she wants to bring everyone together to address problems. I think she wants to observe them up close and personal.

It was the issue I saw from my experience with the new VP that I discussed above. Some boss supervision style is based on personal impression as well as work performance. As much as I hate to say women have that style more than men it is hard for me to think differently because it was my experience. Women appear to supervise more on the emotional area vs gut cut and dry employment performance.

I was told many times that I supervised like a man. I judged people on their performance and not how many compliments to stroke my ego of my appearance. I did not care about your personal problems, I did not care if you thought I was cute, I did not care if you liked my hair, shoes or outfit I had on. These were things my employees thought would work as stroking their boss. You would not tell your male boss you like his hair style or his outfit but they think that works with women.


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

  • Posted by ohiomom 3rdrockfromthesun (My Page) on
    Fri, Mar 1, 13 at 11:21

Jodik ... maybe more than 20 words, but in a nutshell:

Yahoo was losing their share of the search advertising business to Google, they were not investing in social networking sites such as Facebook and YouTube, losing the younger internet users. Advertising sales were down, employee morale was low and apparently shareholders were unhappy because of the collapse of possible merger with Microsoft.

Personally I do not care for Yahoo, and their "news" articles leave a lot to be desired IMO. I use google search and read my news elsewhere online.

Here is a link that might be useful: source of course


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

I was told many times that I supervised like a man. I judged people on their performance and not how many compliments to stroke my ego of my appearance. I did not care about your personal problems, I did not care if you thought I was cute, I did not care if you liked my hair, shoes or outfit I had on.

marq, this is a really sexist viewpoint from those who told you that. I hope you put them in their place.


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

Jersey, I am aware it is sexist and I prefaced my remarks before I expressed my opinion.
As much as I hate to say women have that style more than men it is hard for me to think differently because it was my experience.

I know they did not mean it as sexist but it is true there is a difference of a female supervisors vs male supervisors. We have a different make up and there is no getting around that fact. I am not saying one is better than the other. But it is true we are different. Just as employees will relate differently to a female vs male supervisor.

A woman employee will have no problem telling you she is having cramps but she would not tell her male boss she is having cramps. Women that reported to me soon learned that was not a issue to bring to me. If you are ill just request the time and take it. There are many examples of how employees will relate if it is a male/female supervisor and how a male and female react.


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

Somebody at the top admires this woman. And for the sake of Yahoo employees, I hope she's successful.

I'm sure she's already tuned out the noise, gossip and chatter and is focused on her assignment; Change this place.


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

Marissa Mayer the new CEO of Yahoo has rescinded telecommuting in her attempt to "save her company".

It's always a bad sign when you're second-guessing yourself.

-Ron-


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

I know they did not mean it as sexist but it is true there is a difference of a female supervisors vs male supervisors.

I just don't believe that. There are differences in *people* as supervisors - there is nothing about supervising that has anything to do with gender.


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

Marquest, I could not disagree with you more. Some people need the stimulus and/or structure that working in an office environment brings, others don't. That does not make one employee more valuable, or a better employee than another.

Some work lends it self to working from home, some work doesn't. It is only when the two mesh well, the type of work and they type of employee, does working from home make sense to the company and the employee.

As for men supervisors and female supervisors managing differently because of their sex......very complicated. I do believe that often, not always , women and men approach issues differently but not to the extent that one could say one or the other managed" like a woman " or managed " like a man."....I don't buy that one bit.


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

I was told many times that I supervised like a man. I judged people on their performance and not how many compliments to stroke my ego of my appearance.

Purely anecdotal, but my experience is that men in supervisory positions are more likely to be swayed by having their ego gratified.


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

Thanks, Ohiomom... I use Google, too... and I read news from other sources. Yahoo isn't something I use or view on anything resembling a regular basis, and I have no reason to keep abreast of their corporate issues.

I've never thought in terms of gender when it came to supervisors or bosses, but more in terms of how they did their job. Working for a good boss is working for a good boss, and being a good employee is giving at least 100% to your chosen job... often more.

The shame of the job market today is that so many people are more or less forced to be unhappy in their positions because they can't afford to lose the pay they make, and locate the right job for themselves... one that is fulfilling to the individual.

A good boss is one who isn't afraid to roll up their sleeves and get into the trenches with their team of employees... or would never ask an employee to do something they, themselves, wouldn't do. A good boss leaves the "personal" at home, and keeps the "business" at work, while being a normal, caring human being with a reasonable sense of humor, etc.

I would agree with Chase... some work can be done remotely, from home... while other aspects of a job may not lend themselves to such, and need to be addressed at the place of employment with the rest of the team.

If the new CEO is calling in the troops to get a feel for how everyone works together, to look for solutions as a team, etc... perhaps she's on the right track. Time will tell. The internet is a fickle place when it comes to popularity of websites...


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

Wow, this is a tough topic.

I work from home when my children are sick and cannot go to school or daycare. I'll be the first to admit that I really don't get much done on these days (especially when it's my youngest who is home), but I figure it's better than not being available at all. At least this way I can still respond to emails and handle emergencies.

I feel guilty doing this though. I know that it's not an option that is available across the board in my company. Sometimes I feel like my colleagues think I'm getting special treatment. But the reality is that my boss would rather I work from home on those days than take a vacation day, so that's what I do.


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

But the reality is that my boss would rather I work from home on those days than take a vacation day, so that's what I do.

Your boss appreciates you. That's a good thing.

I suspect there will be some Yahoo employees who will be "exempt" from the new rules because even the stodgiest business out there realize they need to be flexible to get good employees.


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

Edited to remove duplicate post

This post was edited by chase on Fri, Mar 1, 13 at 18:35


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

Marquest, I could not disagree with you more. Some people need the stimulus and/or structure that working in an office environment brings, others don't. That does not make one employee more valuable, or a better employee than another.

Chase maybe I did not explain my position. If a job require you to telecommute and you need people to stimulate you to work then you should seek employment elsewhere. The employee that can do the job under the required condition is the better employee. I work better alone. The chatter drives me crazy. I am discipline and do not need stimulation. The job is my stimulation.

When you have employees that are already working from home it is usually because they work more effective under those conditions. You change those conditions and you lose productivity all that darn chatter and socializing is annoying to some. When I worked at the office I kept my door closed and you knocked to come in and you knew it was not social hour.


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

" When you have employees that are already working from home it is usually because they work more effective under those conditions"

Not true......simply not true. Much has been allowed to happen in an uncontrolled, feel good manner that has not been good for the employees or the corporation.

Working from home is not a right it is a privilege. Working from home is only good when the work , the team and the employee all benefit

Here is one that will get some going.......

I would never promote anyone who was working from home exclusively. Before you promote someone you need to see them with the client, with their peers, in leadership roles. My experince is that those who choose to work from home exclusively are quite content with that and don't aspire to much more...which is OK.....but it it's limiting if one wants to progress.


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

Steph, working from home an occasional day because of a personal situation, such as a sick baby or even a social school event is AOK . As matter of fact I think it strengthens the employer/ employee relationship.

That is way different from telecommuting which takes the employee out of the corporate workplace entirely.


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

Chase that is your management style, your perception. It did not happen in my business. As I said it depends on the business.

If you listen to your argument you feel as a Supervisor you have to physically see the employee. You need the stimulation of others to perform. This is what I was saying about the difference of a woman supervisor vs a male.

I had a staff of 10 did not need to see them as long as the work was done and excellent product produced that was the value. Not seeing how they looked or acted visually. No one had a problem moving up in the company.

We had monthly meetings one day and quarterly meetings that were one week. That was enough of seeing someone.

You have the touchy feely style of management. You are going to make me get people going. That is a Female style of supervision. Working from home does take you out of the Corporate world of the 50s. That does not hold true for a lot of profession today.

Telecommute employees save the company financially, because of office space, utilities, building insurance, and maintenance.


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

People who who are home based and telecommute, in my experience, have jobs that involve fairly routine activities and the roles are somewhat static. This excludes sales type roles, however, which are often home based but are easily measured by sales production. What is common between both is that outcomes are easily measured.

People whose jobs require creativity, in roles that require any type of planning, development, learning, are not home based because of the need for collaboration. Collaboration is hindered when one or more members of a team is at the end of a phone. This contributes to the huge amount of business travel that happens daily. People get together to work. Results in these jobs are measured, but not from the standpoint of x amount per period.

I very much agree with Chase But I slightly disagree with one of her comments - I would promote a home based employee but NOT into a job that required any amount of teamwork. Home based jobs, by definition, have ceilings no matter who is doing the job. IMO One must perform as an effective contributor in teams to earn increasingly responsible jobs.

At this stage in Yahoo, the need for collaboration and teamwork is huge. And the CEO is trying to improve it within her organization. Her decision is what CEOs do.


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

Marquest I did not say I NEED to see the employee work.

I had a staff of over 200 , many of whom telecommuted and many who worked in an entirely different city. I certainly didn't see all my employees all the time!

All I said was that there must be a fit with the work, the employee and the goals of the team before I would agree to telecommuting.....something I SUPPORT when the fit is right.

As far as promoting people to higher management , yes they had to demonstrate leadership skills, conflict resolution, verbal communication skills etc. and they had to do that in a way that was visible to the entire management team they aspired to join and that next working in the office environment.

I really take offense to you labeling my management style. you have no idea what you are talking about . None at all......

The LAST thing I was was"touchy feely".

Edited to add.

Jmc, heartily agree with your post. My comment on promotions was reflective of the fact promotions within my team would almost always be to entry level management or mid management positions.

This post was edited by chase on Mon, Mar 4, 13 at 7:13


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

Very smart woman! I'll be using my VPN tomorrow.

"Last week, Yahoo banned employees from working from home.
How did CEO Marissa Mayer decide to make such a controversial decision?
According to a source, the only way Mayer is comfortable making any decision: with the help of data.
Like a lot of companies, Yahoo has something called a Virtual Private Network or VPN. Remote workers can use it to securely log into Yahoo's network and do work.
(LifeHacker has a really good explanation of what a VPN is.)
After spending months frustrated at how empty Yahoo parking lots were, Mayer consulted Yahoo's VPN logs to see if remote employees were checking in enough.
Mayer discovered they were not ��" and her decision was made.
Kara Swisher first reported news that Mayer was showing executives Yahoo's VPN logs to justify her work-from-home ban.
Mayer is famously obsessed with metrics and data.
Once, a Google designer quit the company in a huff because he was tired of how Mayer, in charge of how Google.com homepage looked, would choose design elements like color or font not based on taste, but raw data.
For every design variable, she looked at how users interacted with Google with one design ��" and then the other.
If the data showed users were using Google.com faster one way intead of the other, that particular design choice won out.
It's hard to argue that Mayer's process didn't work for Google. It was not the first search engine on the market, but it's just about the only one anybody uses now.
Likewise, we're hearing from people close to Yahoo executives and employees that she made the right decision banning work from home.
"The employees at Yahoo are thrilled," says one source close to the company.
"There isn't massive uprising. The truth is, they've all been pissed off that people haven't been working."

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/how-marissa-mayer-figured-out-work-at-home-yahoos-were-slacking-off-2013-3#ixzz2MOT9ydKr


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

Chase, my comment came from this.......
Before you promote someone you need to see them with the client, with their peers, in leadership roles.

What does see them mean to you? This sounds to me if you cannot visually see vs results you can analysis you do not feel you can determine them to be promotable. That is touchy feely to me.

My experince is that those who choose to work from home exclusively are quite content with that and don't aspire to much more...which is OK.....but it it's limiting if one wants to progress.

Correct you are basing your opinion on your experience. I am coming at this of my experience.

Ex......
If someone was not mobile and independent to work without eyes on the employee you were doomed to be in the office as a grunt. The ones that were prepared to get a call and say we need someone in Puerto Rico tomorrow morning and you may be there for 3 weeks. But you can also end up being there 3 months. That was the employee that was valuable to the company. Those were the ones that moved up in the company. They could meet the company needs at a moments notice get results and was deemed worthy of a promotion.

They did not need to be seen by someone in the office to see how they interacted and handled clients. That was an employee that could go to an area identify the problem pull the necessary people together and solve the problem.

If you have an employee that went to the clients vs the client coming to you, how would you deem that employee worthy of a promotion? Do you get on the plane and walk behind him and watch?

My point was it depends on the industry and expectation of that industry. As everything in life there are no absolutes.

JMC
NOT into a job that required any amount of teamwork. Home based jobs, by definition, have ceilings no matter who is doing the job. IMO One must perform as an effective contributor in teams to earn increasingly responsible jobs.

I go back to the industry. Because a person is not in the office does not mean they are sitting in a corner of their home in front of a computer or a stack of papers. There are many jobs that require pulling teams together to accomplish a project. Some "person watcher" does not need to see you. They need to see results. You controlled a crisis, solved the issues and the company made money..... bottom line.

It is a fallacy that everyone that works from home is an island that never needs to communicate to complete a project with a team. Without knowing what all jobs entail I can only think of the jobs that might be isolated would be sales and a IT help desk. But even from my expereience the IT dept had teams they had to communicate and coordinate.

I am saying look beyond the shoes you walked in vs industries you do not know from experience what would make an employee promotable. It is like me saying a building is going to fall down because I have built cars and cars are built this way.


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

The fact that it is important for potential promotees to demonstrate various skills in various situations including face to face , office environment, conflict resolution, human interaction etc has ZERO to do with " touchy feely" whatever that is.


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

Personally, I could care less about design elements when using a web page as a search engine. I'm only using it to do a quick search. I want accuracy, speed, and good material to come up when searching. I want ease of using loose parameters, etc. What the page looks like is irrelevant. Though, I could do without all the busy ads going on in the borders.

Using gathered data is extremely helpful in gauging what the public will use or want, though...

The internet is a fast changing place where it's important to keep a buzz going if you hope to attract and keep traffic... I think it's very important to keep your name circulating through the public realm, or offer a service that people need frequently... like a search engine.


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

I am a full-time work-at-home employee. It doesn't work for everyone and it doesn't apply to every job, but it does work very well for me. All my colleagues and clients are in different places. Going into "an office" would not benefit my work at all. I would still be on the phone, using email, IM, etc. to get my job done.


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

The fact that it is important for potential promotees to demonstrate various skills in various situations including face to face , office environment, conflict resolution, human interaction etc has ZERO to do with " touchy feely" whatever that is.

So you are saying it is a fact in all professions it is important but not a "absolute" have to happen to be promotable?


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

I am saying I would not promote anyone to a management position without assessing those skills.......and that is not touchy feely.


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

I am saying I would not promote anyone to a management position without assessing those skills.......and that is not touchy feely.


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

Sorry for the double post.

This post was edited by chase on Sat, Mar 2, 13 at 12:21


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

I am saying I would not promote....

That is where I was going with the touchy feely. You would not promote....... It is not a fact, it is your ruler for promotion. All professions and all people in the position to make that call it is possible to not be something they need to make that decision to promote an employee. I am basing my opinion on this issue from experience.

Edited to add....
GW has a stupid delay. When you hit submit you think it is not going through and when you hit submit again it sends a double post. I do not know if that is what is happening for you but I know that is what happened to me when I had double post.

This post was edited by marquest on Sat, Mar 2, 13 at 12:45


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

Sorry to disappoint but it was the part of the HR career development and evaluation policy of the entire company. It was not MY policy although I did agree with it.

Your assessment of my managerial style and skill, based on an opinion formed online, is an excellent example of how wrong assessment based on "distance" assessments can be.


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

"JMC
NOT into a job that required any amount of teamwork. Home based jobs, by definition, have ceilings no matter who is doing the job. IMO One must perform as an effective contributor in teams to earn increasingly responsible jobs.

I go back to the industry. Because a person is not in the office does not mean they are sitting in a corner of their home in front of a computer or a stack of papers. There are many jobs that require pulling teams together to accomplish a project. Some "person watcher" does not need to see you. They need to see results. You controlled a crisis, solved the issues and the company made money..... bottom line."

measurable results...that is exactly what I said above. Measurable results. Teamwork and collaboration is not measurable by xx number of completed things per period.

However, since this thread is about Yahoo, and since Mayer can prove that remote employees weren't logging in...then she has made an excellent decision! She absolutely measured..logins.

Marquest, In my experience and that of my currently working friends, not a single organization has higher level mid or senior management who primarily work from home.


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

I hope Yahoo's VPN network wasn't like mine, which was dial-up. I never logged into the VPN because 1) it was unbearable slow and; 2) I didn't need any of the files that were on the network because I created my own files.

This post was edited by jerzeegirl on Sat, Mar 2, 13 at 18:20


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

It really depends on the nature of the work and the team members. My team is scattered all over the world. Many do not live near an office, so communication with them is always by phone or electronically. The workflow of my current projects is such that I am typically in back-to-back meetings most of the day. Transferring from one conference room to another at the office loses at least 5 to 15 minutes on either end of the meeting depending on where the conference room is. At a minimum, that's a 33% loss from a 30-minute meeting. Not workable. Had I been in the office I'd have been on the phone anyway and adding to the noise level for the cubicles around mine.

I have spent enough time in the office to be known and trusted. I wouldn't have expected to work remotely from day one. There is definitely benefit to face-to-face contact for team building, but it doesn't have to be daily. One week of a disbursed group working together in a single location can serve the purpose. The big things that one loses by not being in the office are the useful tidbits that are part of casual conversations. On the other hand, all that chitchat can waste a lot of time.

Timing matters, too. I'm at a point in life and career where I'm known and the quality of my work product stands on it own. Other companies would be delighted to have my services. If I were younger and hoping to get promotions and new opportunities, I'd be in the office and visible for at least part of every week. Like it or not, emotions and the schmooze factor are a large part of decisions that we'd like to think are objective and rational.


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

I do not know if this is in any of the links posted here I do not remember but I heard they are giving the employees until June. It sounds like June it the start date.

yogacat, The way the industry I worked at closed that gap of schmooze time was done through Quarterly meetings. There is no more telling of the true grit of employees when your meetings are a week in Vegas, Alaska, Puerto Rico. There were many that lost all chance of moving up and some were moved out when cut time came around.

Taking people out of a office environment you get a good sense of an the employees capable of understanding you may be sitting in a conference room next to the slot machines but you are an employee at work and not on vacation. Those meetings I think demonstrated more about employees than any office daily watcher could gleem.

It takes a certain type of Boss capable to supervise remote employees and some industries it is beneficial financially and acquiring and retaining the best talent for a company to have employees capable to work remote.


 o
RE: So, is she a yahoo?

Any manager worth their salary must be capable of effectively managing office based staff, telecommuters and satellite locations. If they can't effectively manage all three they should not be managers......how's that for touchy feely?


 o Post a Follow-Up

Please Note: Only registered members are able to post messages to this forum.

    If you are a member, please log in.

    If you aren't yet a member, join now!


Return to the Hot Topics Forum

Information about Posting

  • You must be logged in to post a message. Once you are logged in, a posting window will appear at the bottom of the messages. If you are not a member, please register for an account.
  • Please review our Rules of Play before posting.
  • Posting is a two-step process. Once you have composed your message, you will be taken to the preview page. You will then have a chance to review your post, make changes and upload photos.
  • After posting your message, you may need to refresh the forum page in order to see it.
  • Before posting copyrighted material, please read about Copyright and Fair Use.
  • We have a strict no-advertising policy!
  • If you would like to practice posting or uploading photos, please visit our Test forum.
  • If you need assistance, please Contact Us and we will be happy to help.


Learn more about in-text links on this page here