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Possible Ebola in Canada

Posted by eibren z6PA (My Page) on
Tue, Mar 25, 14 at 2:17

Supposedly no risk to general public--transmission is by direct contact with secretions, including sweat.

Since coming off of an airplane, passengers sometimes bump each other, they may be overly optimistic, imo.

Here is a link that might be useful: CNN


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Possible Ebola in Canada

Unless there is more to it which hasnt been explained, I would certainly agree, Eibren.
Coughing or sneezing, the flight attendant perhaps, when collecting the disposable beverage cups from customers could have touched the area of the cup which is where his mouth was when sipping - and all of this is before he even disembarked from the plans.
Did a significant other meet him and kiss him an the mouth as soon as they met in the airport? My husband travels quite a bit in his job and I always am waiting to greet him when he disembarks from the plane and we always hug and kiss, often several times.

Perhaps the article was poorly researched and written, not going into enough detail to explain why the public needs to not have any concern - we can only hope that this is the case.


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RE: Possible Ebola in Canada

No sweat as the saying goes, cause there is no sweating in this weather...


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RE: Possible Ebola in Canada

Public display of affection will be banned.


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RE: Possible Ebola in Canada

  • Posted by rosie Southeast 7A/B (My Page) on
    Tue, Mar 25, 14 at 7:27

There's nothing on the CDC website right now, waiting for sold data of course. Their last report of Ebola was in Uganda in December 2012.

This poor guy apparently does have a hemorrhagic fever of some type, Ebola only one. CDC says a couple of treatments have helped with a couple of types, but basically we have no cures for any of them, just supportive care while the body battles it.

BTW, Eibren, you're interested in communicable diseases from the far corners. I don't know if you're getting any, but CBC emails updates on a wide range of stuff. I learned to choose carefully after inadvertently getting myself snowed with an amazing amount of daily updates and now just get a weekly list of topics to open and read or not.

I get them mainly just out of curiosity about what's going on out there and frankly often don't bother to read them, but I do focus a bit more on the flu reports as the season develops.

Scientists do expect pandemic illness to get out of control at some point, and the usual first response of government seems to be to close down information. I don't empty my trash file that often, and it typically has at least a few of these to check if something makes me wonder if they suddenly stopped reporting on something. I wasn't getting these back in 2007, though, when all discussion of possible a type A flu epidemic suddenly disappeared from our media.

BTW, one thing these reports make you appreciate is that that are a lot of people in a lot of nations busy working to control and wipe out disease. It can never always be enough, of course, but they do a whole bunch.


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RE: Possible Ebola in Canada

Here is more detailed information. The authorities are keeping us posted but it looks as if there is low risk to the public at this time.

Here is a link that might be useful: possible Ebola case in Canada


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RE: Possible Ebola in Canada

According to what I'm reading, there's really no reason to panic, or to panic the public... straight forward information on travel precautions and isolation in case of suspected infection... plus, it would appear that Canada is hard at work with promising results on a possible "cure?" for future use against this potentially deadly pathogen... if that's what it is.

No worries reported quite yet... so we can remain calm.


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RE: Possible Ebola in Canada

From what I found last night, the Canadians do have a treatment, but it is one that only works if administered in the first 24 houirs (another plot line for TV series "24" if that is still running).


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RE: Possible Ebola in Canada

It has been confirmed it is not an ebola case


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RE: Possible Ebola in Canada

Of course, right now they don't know much, but get ready for the world to come to an end, just in case. BEER.

I happened to be reading about the outbreak in Guinea and had actually just posted about it on the current end of the world thread. When I was reading, I remember that there was a sentence that it was HIGHLY contagious, Maybe that's just in primitive settings, but I don't expect any government to want to panic us with that kind of comment.

So, from one of the links above we get,

"There is no drug treatment for Ebola hemorrhagic fever, she said, adding it is not a highly infectious disease."

And in the other link, we get:

"Health-care workers are wearing goggles, masks, gowns, gloves and boots when around the patient."

I'm off to stock up on GOOD beer. If the world's coming to and end, drink good beer.

Eat, drink and be merry, I tell you, for tomorrow.....

Hay


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RE: Possible Ebola in Canada

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Tue, Mar 25, 14 at 14:06

The existing North American version is Hantavirus, which is fortunately rare. But the small number of people who have happened to get it won't have cared at all how rare it was.


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RE: Possible Ebola in Canada

Here's a link--tested negative for the usual hemorrhagic fevers, and gives a bit more info about the outbreak in Africa right now, etc.

Here is a link that might be useful: The Globe


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RE: Possible Ebola in Canada

It's still spreading in Africa.

Here is a link that might be useful: CNN


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RE: Possible Ebola in Canada

At least 86 are now dead from this particular version of Ebola, which seems to be one of the more virulent strains.

A concern is that it has spread to Conakry, a city of two million in West Africa, where there is poor sanitation for most. MSF (doctors without borders) is concerned a broader humanitarian crisis could be created, and adjoining countries are closing their borders.

This is the first outbreak in West Africa. There is an international airport in Conakry :

http://www.mapsofworld.com/international- airports/africa/guinea.html

A driver for an aid group was infected when he carried a friend to the hospital, and he is now dead. The aid members have so far tested negative:

http://news.yahoo.com/ebola-patients-await-death-guinea-wards-154754139.html

People are fearful, and avoiding markets and churches.

Topix.com has reports four health care workers have died from the disease, and that doctors had fled Dinguirae Hospital because of an Ebola scare.

When an old man vomited on a local bus, the other passengers all fled.

Pretty close to a panic state.

Here is a link that might be useful: Reuters


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RE: Possible Ebola in Canada

I guess measles is spreading in NYC, I saw on the news the other day.


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RE: Possible Ebola in Canada

It sounds like everything is under control. I wouldn't go visit Guinea right now, though.

"Fears of an Ebola epidemic spreading from the West African nation of Guinea are unfounded, health officials say, as the fight is on to end one of the worst outbreaks of the deadly disease in recent history.
Doctors Without Borders reported Monday that 122 people have contracted Ebola -- which is perhaps the best-known and deadliest of the world’s hemorrhagic fevers -- during the current outbreak, and that 78 of them have died.

Senegal has closed its border with Guinea, and the World Health Organization confirmed Sunday that Ebola cases have been identified in two border countries. A rumor in Nigeria, West Africa's most populous nation, sparked an Ebola scare that the nation’s health officials quickly defused.

But leading health officials and experts say that there is very little chance that the Ebola outbreak will spread much beyond Guinea, as the nature of the disease and the efficacy of efforts to stop its spread will likely cause it to peter out fairly quickly, much as other recent Ebola outbreaks have."

Here is a link that might be useful: Ebola in West Africa


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RE: Possible Ebola in Canada

  • Posted by rosie Southeast 7A/B (My Page) on
    Thu, Apr 3, 14 at 20:16

Yes, Ebola reaching a population center guaranteed plenty of attention to control. We'll do our part by not be traveling to the Guinea area any time soon.

As for the numbers, I read that "Ebola" is only one of the hemorrhagic fevers that have broken out, and Ebola alone has at least 4 strains. So what they mean, I don't know.

In any case, the most alarming thing I found, as far as it goes, which isn't very much, is that one of the Ebola viruses may have been passed airborne from pigs to macaques in cages in the same room. Apparently, though, that wouldn't necessarily mean a truly airborne strain had developed or that it could be passed between humans even if it had.

On the good side, reportedly efforts to develop a treatment are also getting a lot more attention after years of concentrating on more likely causes of panepidemic disease. How amazing that we still have not discovered its source.


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Ebola in Conakry, Guinea's Capital

This time they seem to be thinking it may have been contracted initially from bats. I am conjecturing that the initially reported victim may have eaten bush meat, a commonly believed source of the virus.

The initial outbreak was the result of the funeral for that initial elderly victim, from the caregivers and the ritual funeral washing of his body. The mourners then traveled home, spreading the virus further.

The concern with Conakry, Guinea's capital, having cases is that it is a city of 10,000 people per square mile, and sanitary conditions are not that good for much of the population.

For a little over $1000 one can be on a direct flight to Paris, France from Conakry, and from there to anywhere on the planet.


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RE: Possible Ebola in Canada

Bats. Yes, I've read reports that fruit bats can carry it. I think I'll cross Australia off my travel list also.


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RE: Possible Ebola in Canada

You don't know if you can believe every thing you read about new breaking stories, but I saw that Ebola is spread pretty easily just in sweat.

That's a problem. When I'm dancing I try very hard to wash my hands a lot and not be touching my face. When I go to some of the big dance festivals, particularly the contra ones, I'm touching a new person after every 8 beats of music. People who have just touched other people, all up and down the line. Thousands of hands, a veritable menagerie of germs. The worst thing that happens is I might come back with a new cold. Our bodies are pretty good at keeping the germs away.

But, when it gets really bad, it's going to be a real downer when I have to stop my dancing.

It'll happen. Just a manner of when. Keep me posted on Ebola. I've got a supply of latex gloves and face masks tucked away for the day.

Hay


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Conakry Flight Quarantined in Paris

© AFP Text by FRANCE 24
Latest update : 2014-04-04
A flight from the Guinean capital of Conakry was quarantined in Paris for two hours on Friday morning, amid rising concern over the unprecedented Ebola epidemic that has hit the West African country.

The plane’s passengers and crew were submitted to tests briefly after the Air France aircraft landed at Charles de Gaulle airport, north of the French capital, at 5:28am.

Emergency services were alerted after a dirty toilet sparked concerns that a passenger could be infected with the deadly and highly contagious virus, which is known for triggering severe diarrhea.

An Airfrance spokesman said that all the tests turned out negative.

Health officials in Guinea have reported 134 suspected Ebola cases since the beginning of the year, in an epidemic that has claimed 86 lives and may not be easily contained.

There have been reported cases of the disease in Liberia, and three suspected victims were identified in Mali.

Sylvain Baize, who heads France's National Reference Centre for haemorrhagic fever, told the AFP news agency Friday that the outbreak, new to West Africa, "is serious -- by all accounts, it is not under control."

France has stepped up vigilance for the virus. The country, a former colonial power in much of West Africa, is a major portal for air traffic from the region.

(FRANCE 24 with AFP)

Isolated' Liberian Ebola case raises fears of fresh outbreaks across West Africa
Liberian hunter dies despite never travelling to outbreak's epicentre in Guinea, as Mali becomes fourth country to report suspected cases and France alerts doctors to watch for symptoms
Doctors without Borders staff carry the body of a person killed by viral haemorrhagic fever in Guekedou, Guinea Photo: AFP
By Mike Pflanz, Nairobi1:36PM BST 04 Apr 2014
A Liberian bushmeat trapper who died of Ebola caught the virus despite living far away from the epicentre of the current epidemic in Guinea, raising fears of multiple concurrent outbreaks of the haemorrhagic fever.
The illness is only passed through direct contact with an infected person, or their corpse, meaning that the Liberian hunter must have succumbed to a strain unconnected to the one doctors are battling to contain in Guinea.
Already, 86 people have died there, and there are a further 51 suspected cases already known to medical staff, the Guinean health ministry said.
Hundreds more could be infected and not yet know it.
Mali on Thursday became the fourth West African country to identify suspected cases.
Seven Liberians have died, including the forest hunter, since Ebola was first reported there, and there are several possible cases in Sierra Leone.
The French health ministry alerted its doctors nationwide to be on the look out for patients reporting to clinics with Ebola-like symptoms. At Charles de Gaulle airport in Paris, an Air France plane arriving from the capital Conakry was briefly quarantined on the runway while passengers were checked early this morning. Guinea is a former French colony.
South Africa has also warned its port health officials to monitor travellers arriving from Guinea for symptoms.
The Ebola virus (CDC/AFP)
There is no vaccine and no cure for Ebola, which can kill up to nine in ten people who are infected. Mortality rates from the current outbreak are averaging 65 percent, the World Health Organisation said.
"We have a case...where a hunter who has not had any contact with anyone coming from Guinea got sick," Bernice Dahn, Liberia's chief medical officer, told the French news agency, AFP.
"He was rushed to the hospital and died 30 minutes later. He never had any interaction with someone suspected to be a carrier of the virus and he has never gone to Guinea. This was an a isolated case."
The man died close to the eastern town of Tapeta, more than 250 miles and a five hour car journey from the Guinean border.
One medical aid worker currently in West Africa said it was a worrying development.
"If we have a new case like that, not linked to Guinea, then the fear is there can be more outbreaks which start anywhere in the region," she said, not willing to give her name because the new case was not yet confirmed as unconnected to the Guinea outbreak.
Ebola is thought to originate in wild animals, especially fruit bats, which are a delicacy in some parts of West Africa. It can be transmitted to humans through direct contact with an infected animal.
It is then transmitted from human to human, again through direct contact.
It is not airborne.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/africaandindianocean/liberia/10744564/Isolated-Liberian-Ebola-case-raises-fears-of-fresh-outbreaks-across-West-Africa.html

Saudi Arabia said it had suspended issuing visas for visits to its holy sites for Muslim pilgrims from Guinea and Liberia, the second country where Ebola has been confirmed, where four have also died. There are suspected cases also in Sierra Leone.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/africaandindianocean/guinea/10738161/Medic-tells-of-horrific-scenes-in-Guineas-fight-against-Ebola-virus.html

Mob attacks Ebola treatment centre in Guinea
Angry crowds attack Ebola treatment centre, accusing staff of bringing the disease to their town, as fear and mistrust hampers efforts to manage outbreak
Doctors without Borders staff carry the body of a person killed by viral haemorrhagic fever in Guekedou, Guinea
Doctors without Borders staff carry the body of a person killed by viral haemorrhagic fever in Guekedou, Guinea Photo: AFP
Reuters 3:35AM BST 05 Apr 2014
An angry crowd attacked an Ebola treatment centre in Guinea on Friday, accusing its staff of bringing the deadly disease to the town, Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) said, as Mali identified its first suspected cases.
More than 90 people have already died in Guinea and Liberia in what the medical charity has warned could turn into an unprecedented epidemic in an impoverished region with poor health services.
The outbreak in Guinea is the first time the disease, epidemics of which occur regularly in Central Africa, has appeared in the country. Infected patients initially went undiagnosed for several weeks before tests confirmed Ebola.
News of the outbreak has sent shock waves through communities with little knowledge of the disease or how it is transmitted, and the suspected cases in Mali have added to fears that it is spreading in West Africa.
MSF spokesman Sam Taylor told a Thomson Reuters Foundation reporter that the attackers in Macenta, around 265 miles southeast of the capital Conakry, had accused staff of bringing the disease to the town.

"We have evacuated all our staff and closed the treatment centre," he said. "We have the full support of the local leaders and we're working with the authorities to try and resolve this problem as quickly as possible so we can start treating people again."
He declined to give further details of the incident, including whether any MSF staff had been hurt in the attack.
In a statement broadcast on state television late on Thursday, Mali's government announced that three people had been placed in quarantine and samples sent off to Atlanta in the United States for tests.
"A high-speed intervention team has been created to follow the evolution of the situation on the ground," the statement said. It added that the health of the three suspected victims was showing signs of improvement.
The latest outbreak originated in Guinea two months ago. Neighbouring Sierra Leone has since reported suspected cases while Liberia's government has confirmed the disease's presence there. Gambia placed two people in quarantine although the Health Ministry has since said the cases were negative.
Guinea's Health Ministry said two more suspected victims of the virus had died, bringing its death count to 86.
Liberia also reported three new deaths among its suspected 14 cases, raising its death toll to seven.
"We need to fight to contain it. A medical team from MSF came today to help train some of our health workers," said Liberia's health minister, Walter Gwenegale.
FEAR AND MISTRUST
Foreign mining companies have locked down operations and pulled out some international staff in mineral-rich Guinea. French health authorities have also put doctors and hospitals on alert in case people travelling to and from countries in the region pick up the disease.
Ebola, which has killed some 1,500 people since it was first discovered in 1976 in what is now Democratic Republic of Congo, causes vomiting, diarrhoea and external bleeding. It has a fatality rate of up to 90 per cent.
Edited by Steve Wilson
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/africaandindianocean/guinea/10746237/Mob-attacks-Ebola-treatment-centre-in-Guinea.html

Mali reports three suspected Ebola cases
After neighbouring Guinea records 84 fatal cases of Ebola, three people are reportedly being treated for the disease in Mali

A health specialist at work at an isolation ward for patients at the Doctors Without Borders facility in Guekedou, southern Guinea Photo: Seyllou/ Getty
AFP 1:42AM BST 04 Apr 2014
Mali said on Thursday it had detected three suspected victims of Ebola, the deadly disease that has killed 84 people in Guinea.
"Three suspected cases of haemorrhagic fever have been detected in the country. Samples have been taken and sent abroad for analysis," the country's Health Minister Ousmane Kone said.
Pending results from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, where the samples were sent, the patients were isolated and were receiving appropriate medication.
The government said in a statement the patients' condition was currently improving.
The results of the tests are to be made public as soon as they are known.

Mali neighbours Guinea, where the epidemic has killed 84 people out of 134 cases registered since January, mainly in southern parts of the country, according to the latest Guinean government toll.
Liberia, where seven people have died of haemorrhagic fever since last month, said on Thursday it was dealing with the first case of suspected Ebola to have originated within its own borders.
If confirmed, the case in the eastern town of Tapeta would mark a worrying development in the fight against Ebola, as cases so far have been attributed to people returning with the infection from Guinea.
Ebola can be transmitted to humans from wild animals, and between humans through direct contact with another's blood, faeces or sweat. Sexual contact, or the unprotected handling of contaminated corpses, can also lead to infection.
Edited by Steve Wilson
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/africaandindianocean/mali/10743721/Mali-reports-three-suspected-Ebola-cases.html

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The French health ministry alerted its doctors nationwide to be on the look out for patients reporting to clinics with Ebola-like symptoms. At Charles de Gaulle airport in Paris, an Air France plane arriving from the capital Conakry was briefly quarantined on the runway while passengers were checked early this morning. Guinea is a former French colony.
South Africa has also warned its port health officials to monitor travellers arriving from Guinea for symptoms.
The Ebola virus (CDC/AFP)
There is no vaccine and no cure for Ebola, which can kill up to nine in ten people who are infected. Mortality rates from the current outbreak are averaging 65 percent, the World Health Organisation said.
"We have a case...where a hunter who has not had any contact with anyone coming from Guinea got sick," Bernice Dahn, Liberia's chief medical officer, told the French news agency, AFP.
"He was rushed to the hospital and died 30 minutes later. He never had any interaction with someone suspected to be a carrier of the virus and he has never gone to Guinea. This was an a isolated case."
The man died close to the eastern town of Tapeta, more than 250 miles and a five hour car journey from the Guinean border.
One medical aid worker currently in West Africa said it was a worrying development.
"If we have a new case like that, not linked to Guinea, then the fear is there can be more outbreaks which start anywhere in the region," she said, not willing to give her name because the new case was not yet confirmed as unconnected to the Guinea outbreak.
Ebola is thought to originate in wild animals, especially fruit bats, which are a delicacy in some parts of West Africa. It can be transmitted to humans through direct contact with an infected animal.
It is then transmitted from human to human, again through direct contact.
It is not airborn
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/africaandindianocean/liberia/10744564/Isolated-Liberian-Ebola-case-raises-fears-of-fresh-outbreaks-across-West-Africa.html

Here is a link that might be useful: France 24


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Reston Strain of Ebola

There was an incident in Reston, Virginia previously where an entire shipment of monkeys from the Phillipines were sickened by a strain of the virus, now called the Reston strain. Some humans exposed to it seroconverted, but the strain seemed unable to sicken them sufficiently to make it noticeable.

Mali is now concerned they may have acase of Ebola in that country.
http://en.africatime.com/mali/articles/mali-identifies-first-possible-cases-ebola

CroftsBlogs reports on the crisis committee's report on progress:
April 05, 2014

Ebola in Guinea: National Crisis Committee reports

Via Guinéenews.org: Haemorrhagic fever: the latest report of the National Crisis Committee. The Google translation:

The national crisis committee met yesterday Friday, April 4 at Conakry to decide on the course of the epidemic of Ebola haemorrhagic fever in Guinea.
According to the findings of this committee, the disease has so far made 86 victims of 143 cases reported in 6 health districts of the country including the capital Conakry counts her dead 5 of 18 cases. Is generally 60 percent lethality.
Ebola and neighboring countries
In the cases of contagion reported in neighboring Guinea, the report states that in Mali, three suspected cases have been reported in people working in a mine at the border with Guinea. The samples were sent to CDC and Dakar, says the document.
In Sierra Leone, it is reassuring that there are suspected cases but noted, however, that monitoring arrangements are strengthened as well as staff training.
The report stresses against that Liberia confirmed cases died and 32 people who had contact with them, have been identified and placed under surveillance.
Symptoms of Ebola
In addition, specialists viral infections show that Ebola has an incubation period ranging from 1 to 2 weeks. According to them, it is manifested by a sudden fever with headache, muscles in the throat, severe fatigue, red eyes, rashes.
Between the fourth and fifth days, it causes nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and delirium. According to this document always, half of patients have bleeding in the skin, nose, mouth and bloody diarrhea. It indicates that, on average, 23 to 88 percent of people with Ebola died between 7 and 10 days after onset.
Terms fatal Ebola
Other equally important information revealed by this report indicate that the Ebola virus is not resistant to heat (30 minutes at 60° C), in the light of the sun. It is destroyed by contact with bleach, detergents, washing powder, soap. It does not survive in water or air.
The level of funds raised
Finally, with respect to the financing of response plan built around 9 points and whose cost is estimated at 4 million 500 thousand dollars, the national crisis committee recalled that the April 4, 830, 466 U.S. dollars are available, is 18 percent...."
http://crofsblogs.typepad.com/h5n1/2014/04/ebola-in-guinea-national-crisis-committee-reports.html

Here is a link that might be useful: The Daily Beast


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