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Wage Theft

Posted by jodik 5 (My Page) on
Mon, Mar 31, 14 at 9:03

A common practice, apparently...

"Seven McDonald's franchises in New York owned by Richard Cisneros will pay nearly $500,000 to fast food workers who claimed they were victims of wage theft under a settlement reached by state Attorney General Eric T. Schneiderman, the Huffington Post reports.

More than 1,600 current and former employees will receive payment. The labor bureau "found that cashiers regularly performed off-the-clock work before and after their shifts," Dave Jamieson writes, doing work without earning any extra income, and were also made to pay for cleaning their own uniforms and didn't get an extra hour of pay after shifts where they worked 10 hours in a row. All of these practices violate New York State labor laws.

The state also recently won a $1.3 million settlement for workers at Domino's in New York City who claimed they experienced similar wage theft tactics.

Given how widespread wage theft is among New York City's fast food businesses, on Tuesday Public Advocate Letitia James announced a proposal to tamp down on these practices, including an anonymous whistleblower hotline for workers, expanding the authority of city agencies to investigate, and urging McDonald's to amend franchisee agreements so that it can hold them accountable when they violate labor laws."

More at the link...

Here is a link that might be useful: Wage Theft


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Wage Theft

Taking advantage of the lowest of wage earners is despicable and should be hit with the heaviest penalties that the law allows for and, if possible, made larger...


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RE: Wage Theft

I suspect it's very common.

I wonder how the owners/managers justify this behavior to themselves? At some point, there was a "first time", did they feel guilty the first time or just look on these workers with contempt and feel nothing?


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RE: Wage Theft

A locally based chain of over 300 convenience stores is facing a class action lawsuit due to alleged wage theft.

Here is a link that might be useful: Stewart's Shops hit with class-action suit involving employee pay


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RE: Wage Theft

Many businesses have the opposite problem.

Many workers that want to keep their jobs, receive raises, receive more hours, get promoted, or that are just energetic or workaholic types work many hours before and after work off-the-clock.


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Apparently, this is widespread...

"The cheerleaders for the Oakland Raiders have alleged a laundry list of labor law violations by the NFL team that employs them. They claim they are paid less than minimum wage and deprived overtime, that their wages are withheld until the end of the season, and that they face fines docked from their $1,250 a season salary for violations like forgetting to bring their pom poms.

A number of Raiderettes filed a class action lawsuit in January against the franchise. But rather than respond to their legal claims, the Raiders are arguing that the cheerleaders have no right to take their allegations to court in the first place, thanks to a clause in their contract. Instead, they are required to take their qualms to arbitration before the NFL commissioner, who is charged with making an unbiased assessment of claims against one of his own teams.

The Raiderettes’ lawyers anticipated this, and argued in their initial complaint that the contract does not stand up to California law."

More at the link...

Here is a link that might be useful: System Rigged...


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RE: Wage Theft

I had a client once who worked for Burger King (she was in her 40's) after losing a good factory job which went to Mexico. She was a hard worker and showed up early in the morning to open it. The owner came by with, as she described it, his silk umbrella and wearing expensive suits. The workers there worked hard, the owner only showed up to check on the business. Tell me how hard he worked to earn the money he made in relation to the workers that were paid minimum wage.


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RE: Wage Theft

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Mon, Mar 31, 14 at 13:09

No, no really, they're all turds that deserve what scraps they get.

Whereas the owners have always worked themselves into positions of exploitation and privilege from nothing, and therefore entitled to be abusive.

Americans didn't form labor unions in the past for the fun of it.


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RE: Wage Theft

I worked for the Federal government and in order to do the job that I had I worked off the clock on practically a daily basis. I was expected to use my lunch time to go from one area to another and was never allowed the federally mandated breaks. I was consistently expected to work above grade and was never compensated in any way. This was business as usual. I don't believe anything has changed since then. This sort of practice is pervasive in our country. It is the reason that American workers are statistically the most "productive" workers in the world.


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RE: Wage Theft

Many workers are expected to meet certain performance levels to keep their jobs, (x amount of work in x amount of time) so often the slower ones will work off the clock to finish this work, or not fall as far behind.

Many will arrive early, stay late, work through breaks/lunches, take work home with them, pay out of pocket for things employers should provide etc.


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RE: Wage Theft

Unless they know the law...

I've worked a lot of jobs in my day, but I knew my rights. I don't work for free. I'm not a slave... not for any job. Not unless it's my business I'm building. If I work a certain amount of hours for someone else, I expect to be given breaks, and I begin work upon punching in... and end upon punching out. If you want me to work overtime, pay me overtime. At minimum wage, I'm worth at least that... if not more, with a good work ethic.


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RE: Wage Theft

Markjames, it is not a matter of not getting your work done. It is a matter of never getting enough work done and if the standard is set by the government so that the American people are getting a free ride off of their employees then why shouldn't the private sector do the same? The expectation that if I am going to keep you on the job you must donate your time to make me richer then it becomes the norm. As a culture we suffer from this.


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RE: Wage Theft

From the news reports from about six or so years ago, a local grocery store hired fewer people than was needed to do the job. They were expected to finish those duties however they managed to get them done - by working through all the breaks, by clocking out and returning to finish their duties.

A lawsuit was filed, after years of dragging through the courts, the store lost. The store then made sure the wage earners signed paperwork acknowledging that they had to take their breaks and clock out without returning to do the work assignments.
So, the store started firing people who were unable to accomplish the assigned duties.
One worker began to secretly record the duty assignments and the effort of accomplishing the duty assignments despite the impossibility of finishing the work on schedule. He secretly recording the firing.

After that, another mass lawsuit was filed but never went to trial once the tape was leaked to the media. New store managers were hired along with a much greater amount of employees to fill the duty assignments but in the end, people quit shopping at the store due to disgust and the store in question was closed. The other branches still suffer because the reputation of the brand was deservedly forever sullied.

Had not the tape been released to the media when a second lawsuit was filed, that store could and probably still be abusing the employees if there was a profit in doing so.


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RE: Wage Theft

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Mon, Mar 31, 14 at 20:38

Yep.

We live in a time when Mal-Wart is the shining example that others watch and follow.


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RE: Wage Theft

My 18 year old son recently left a telemarketing job, a company that was outsourced from Rogers. The stress and abuse on the job (from those he called as well as his managers) became too much and he found another job.

When they deposited his last pay, they took off a tonne of money. When he called them to ask why, they listed off a bunch of BS, like rental of the headset he used while at work, fees for this, fees for that.

I called back to let them know I would instruct my son to contact the Labour Board should they not release the rest of his money that day, they said they would not.

Luckily, my husband's office is only a couple blocks from where my son was working. One of the labour lawyers from the Employment Law group stopped in to speak to the manager. My son was called to pick up a cheque that afternoon.

So what happens to people who don't have a lawyer in the family to take care of this for them?


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RE: Wage Theft

Did the slave-owners feel bad about stealing people's entire lives? A few did, but did not act on it.


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RE: Wage Theft

We have the opposite problem with many motivated, aggressive, over-achieving and workaholic types of employees.

Many want to start working early, work through breaks/lunches, work after hours, work on non scheduled days - all off-the-clock.

It doesn't go over well with co-workers that believe they're stealing their hours.


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RE: Wage Theft

From the news reports from about six or so years ago, a local grocery store hired fewer people than was needed to do the job. They were expected to finish those duties however they managed to get them done - by working through all the breaks, by clocking out and returning to finish their duties.

This happens often at many smaller stores due to the workload per employee.

Many workers have multiple duties and performance standards, so they have to work fast and multi-task to keep up with the workload, performance standards and keep their jobs.

Those that can't keep up are warned, written up, suspended, re-trained, demoted, or terminated.

Many workers, especially closers work without a manager onsite, so they can work off the clock without management knowing.


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RE: Wage Theft

Here's your real wage theft.

Here is a link that might be useful: Average Employee Wastes Two Hours of Every Workday


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RE: Wage Theft

Oh, please... there are as many companies out to screw their employees as there are employees out to skip through a day without too much effort.

Listen... if you want enthusiastic workers willing to go above and beyond, then you must be prepared to treat them and pay them like worthy, valuable human beings.

Yes, it really is that simple.


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RE: Wage Theft

We employ many that go above and beyond since it's their nature.

Many work additional jobs with lower pay and harder working conditions and they show the same effort at these jobs as well.

I was the same way when I worked for the man when I was younger.


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RE: Wage Theft

Isn't idleness built into the pay system, just like payroll tax is?Just as thievery is accounted for in retail prices?

Let's get serious, why would someone bust their butt if they are spending a lifetime stocking shelves and standing behind a register?


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RE: Wage Theft

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Tue, Apr 1, 14 at 13:42

Because they have a work ethic and perhaps also plan to move up in the organization.

Not that I'm saying there isn't a rampant employer abuse problem - see my previous posts and those of others. The bottom line is that corporations long ago got the green light to go ahead and exploit the American public, including both consumers and workers. Hell, they've been downsizing and sending jobs overseas for years - which means it is just not the American public that has been getting the shaft.

What? You want to be paid a decent living? Fine, we'll send your job outside of the country, where legions of desperate people are only too happy to work for much less than we were paying you.

Only now we are sometimes having problems with performance and quality at our overseas plants, so what we are doing is bringing what we can get away with of the labor practices there onto US shores.

People are the same everywhere, both geographically and historically. Of course decisions made in board rooms are often as piratical as ever.

Apes with Big Brains - one of our closest biological relatives hunts and eats live monkeys.


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RE: Wage Theft

When you abuse your employees you have to accept blow back and of course the easiest way to get back is to steal time. That some people do it is not at issue here.

Markjames-your link read very thin to me. Some company called people up and asked questions? How do the world's most productive workers get so much done if they are playing solitaire on their computers instead of doing the pile of work they have to get done?
You can certainly screen for the hyper productive(desperate) worker if you expect more work in a day than can possibly be done.

If you dont live in a culture that values all aspects of life then those workers can seem by comparison to be lazy. They do not give their all to their job because they expect to have some energy for their families and home life. This life model is alien to many Americans. We value getting and having above being.


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RE: Wage Theft

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Tue, Apr 1, 14 at 14:17

Living to work instead of working to live - there is a tradition of Americans defining themselves by their work, with retirement even resulting in suicides. Some people are going to be overbearing in the workplace because they think personal outcomes there are tied to their very essence.


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" We value getting and having above being."

Not all of us... though, well said, Patriciae. I think this idea is at the core of the newest trends, which are downsizing and exiting the material world for one more natural and organic.


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RE: Wage Theft

Speaking of idleness and productivity, the reasons many businesses are so productive (besides better communications, technology, automation etc) is that they have relatively few workers, but their workers are multi-taskers with multiple duties.

Just 1 of these multi-tasking workers with multiple duties often performs the work performed by 2, 3 or more workers only a decade ago.

Since many workers have so many duties and since many businesses have relatively few workers to perform these duties their employees don't have time to slack off - there is "always" something to do.

Performance standards are much higher at many businesses as well, plus many are quicker to warn, write up, suspend, demote or terminate lower performers.

More and more employers are also doing a much better job of matching labor to changing hourly, daily, weekly, monthly, seasonal and unexpected demand.

This is why many use more and more part-timers, temps and on-call workers.

Many I know receive more short notice unscheduled hours than scheduled hours.


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Markjames-your link read very thin to me. Some company called people up and asked questions?

Better link below.

Attorney Ryan Finn discussed alleged labor violations.with dozens of current and former employees.


Here is a link that might be useful: LINK


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RE: Wage Theft

Living to work instead of working to live - there is a tradition of Americans defining themselves by their work, with retirement even resulting in suicides

Yes and it's sad.

I've always identified more with the things I love to do.


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RE: Wage Theft

Markjames you know that businesses do not use part-time, on call temp workers because it is a more efficient way to get the work done. It is because these employees do not have to be paid benefits. It is the Walmart business plan and they didn't invent it. It is one of the big shames of being in business in America. Let the tax payer take care of your workers.


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RE: Wage Theft

Many use more part-timers and floaters, especially stores since demand is part-time - varying substantially by the hour, day, week, month, season.

At peak times they may need a small army of part-timers and floaters working at the same time and later the same day they may have many workers standing around with little or nothing to do.

Unless full timers have multiple skills and multiple duties (which many do not) there's little productive work for them, so it's wasteful to have many of them standing around doing nothing.

Many also use many part-timers working short 4 hour shifts and/or short weeks since they're more productive. Many can work near peak performance for 4 hours, but can't handle 8 plus hour shifts, nor long weeks.

Much demand and absenteeism is unexpected, so more on-call floaters are used. Many businesses tend to run with with a bare minimum of scheduled workers, then use floaters to meet unexpected demand, problems or absenteeism.

Locally, more and more workers are only able/willing to work limited part-time flexible hours, so many have had to adapt to their availability.

Locally, competition is brutal in many regions, so there are less available hours for many to work unless workers work at 2, 3 or more jobs.


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RE: Wage Theft

Oh, lookee... wage theft is so common it has its own Wiki page...

Here is a link that might be useful: Wiki wage theft


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RE: Wage Theft

I've never worked a single job where labor laws weren't violated, or where there wouldn't be punishment for not being a team player.


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RE: Wage Theft

The Call-In-Pay law in New York due to erratic scheduling is frequently violated.

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"Scheduling practices affect how much retail workers take home in pay, whether or not they receive health benefits, and their ability to balance life and work. According to our recent report, “Discounted Jobs: How Retailers Sell Workers Short,” only 17 percent of retail workers surveyed have a set schedule with the majority of workers increasingly facing unpredictable hours, on-call shifts, call-in pay violations, penalties for scheduling requests and benefits avoidance through “legal misclassification.”, The share of part-time retail workers who are involuntarily kept from full-time status has nearly doubled since 2006, and given new abusive scheduling practices, this is not a surprise.[1] Unpredictable schedules make it impossible to earn a steady paycheck and complicate planning for other responsibilities like school and childcare.

The trends in retail scheduling range from inconvenient to abusive to downright illegal. Illegal means a violation of state or federal employment law. Abusive practices fall short of illegality, but can be defined as practices which have a one-sided benefit for the employer only. Inconvenient scheduling practices make work-life balance difficult for frontline retail workers and invite management favoritism.

National retailers are increasingly using these five “just-in-time” scheduling practices:

1. Sent home early without shift (or “call-in”) pay "Illegal

Managers will send associates home early " before the end of their scheduled shift " if they feel they are over-staffed or over-budget. Over 70 percent of workers surveyed in NYC by the Retail Action Project who reported being sent home early failed to received the legally mandated “call-in” pay. The call-in pay law in New York State requires retail employers to pay their workers at the minimum wage for either 4 hours or the full extent of the scheduled shift, whichever is less. Since the shortest shifts we discovered were 4 to 5 hours, in most cases retail workers are due 4 hours pay at the minimum wage " even if they don’t work the entire 4 hours.

2. Hours as the new bonus" Abusive

With part-time workforce growing, retail managers are increasingly using the scheduling of hours as an incentive to increase the pace of selling by sales associates " rewarding or punishing workers with hours. Associates are now competing to make sales not to earn commission but to get scheduled for more hours. Indeed, “getting hours” has become the new bonus. Today, there is absolutely no guarantee for a set number of hours for part-time or full-time workers. Yet, retail workers are working at the whim of market fluctuations with unpredictable fluctuations in weekly hours, making budgeting and planning a real challenge."

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Here is a link that might be useful: Erratic Scheduling


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RE: Wage Theft

And I haven't stayed at any jobs where I was taken advantage of by employers. I have value as a worker, and I won't be used. Plain and simple.

Too many people don't know their rights, or don't care to make a stand for them. I am not one of those.


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Am I being naïve to think that many people today put up with a lot simply to BE employed? Job hopping in an iffy market has its inherent risks now days, but wasn't necessarily the case in the past even with even a modest skillset.


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I would think more people put up with more crap today, Duluth, in order to keep that income. You are correct... it used to be fairly easy to find a good paying factory job with benefits... no so, these days.


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RE: Wage Theft

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Wed, Apr 2, 14 at 13:15

Employers held all the cards back when I was working regularly for other companies - it will certainly be worse now, in the current legal, economic and social climate.

A climate created by employers, with its concentration of resource control in the hands of a tiny minority and resulting artificial austerity for a vast swath of the rest of the population.


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Who has to take duff to stay employed?

With food stamps, rent subsidization, lawsuits, unemployment insurance, medicaid, a lot of people just don't find it worth getting out of the bed for a minimum wage job.


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RE: Wage Theft

^ That certainly explains why a job posting in the inner city gets an immediate line around the block with hundreds of hopeful applicants.


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People want to work. Maybe not in the "Demi-World". But the competition for every available job is pretty stiff - made much more acute by the big drop in job churning and job creation since the economic conditions headed downward.


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RE: Wage Theft

Many workers put up with crap since they don't have the pre/post employment qualifications, plus education, knowledge, skills, experience and performance to get a better job.

Many stay at crappy paying jobs due to transportation issues, (no vehicle or driver's license) flexible hours, proximity to home and daycare, working conditions, complacency etc.

As mentioned, hours are the new reward and punishment for many workers, so many have to put up with a lot of bs and be a team player to receive more hours, choice hours etc,

Many that aren't team players will find themselves unemployed, forever temps, working few hours, working crappy hours, getting poor performance reviews, never getting promoted, receiving crappy work duties etc.


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Markjames, if you are an employer and you are aware that that your employees ( singular or plural) are good workers who work as fast as can be reasonably expected, would you be pleased or displeased if they worked through their lunch period, breaks and/ or stayed late and worked off the clock in order to complete their assigned tasks for that day?


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RE: Wage Theft

Markjames, if you are an employer and you are aware that that your employees ( singular or plural) are good workers who work as fast as can be reasonably expected, would you be pleased or displeased if they worked through their lunch period, breaks and/ or stayed late and worked off the clock in order to complete their assigned tasks for that day?

I've always wanted all workers to receive all their breaks. You literally have to force many to take them.

Most employees are paid by the hour, so they're paid hourly rates, overtime and receive perks until the job is done, or they stop working.


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RE: Wage Theft

Im very glad to hear that, it makes you a reasonable and decent employer! If only there were more of them.


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RE: Wage Theft

"At the start of the 21st century, America's workplace laws are failing to protect our country's workers. In industries ranging from construction and food manufacturing to restaurants, janitorial services and home health care, workers are enduring minimum wage and overtime violations, hazardous working conditions, discrimination, and retaliation for speaking up or trying to organize. They have little recourse because of their need for work, especially during the recession. Until now, however, advocates and policy makers lacked representative and reliable data on the magnitude of the problem, the workers who are most affected, and the industries that are the biggest culprits.

Broken Laws, Unprotected Workers is the first study of its kind, exposing systematic and routine violations of employment and labor laws in core sectors of the economy. In 2008, we conducted a landmark survey of 4,387 workers in low-wage industries in the three largest U.S. cities-Chicago, Los Angeles, and New York City. We used an innovative, rigorous methodology that allowed us to reach vulnerable workers who are often missed in standard surveys, such as unauthorized immigrants and those paid in cash. Our goal was to obtain accurate and statistically representative estimates of the prevalence of workplace violations."

Oh, is there a lot more at the link! Happy Reading!

Here is a link that might be useful: Broken Laws, Unprotected Workers


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RE: Wage Theft

In my business - small-scale residential remodeling, I have no idea how any operator could stay in business with hourly-paid employees, given all the associated costs, and knowing the going billable rates to clients. Unless one is into super-deep pockets with carte-blanche projects, the employee costs would eat the owners earnings and then some.

Seen it happen many times. I could never stay in business if I had employees.


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RE: Wage Theft

Many small narrow focused businesses don't have enough work, enough billable hours, feast/famine cycles etc, hence why they use subs, seasonal workers, low wage workers and on-demand type workers.

Many don't have enough work to keep themselves busy, so they work other jobs, run other businesses etc.


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RE: Wage Theft

Several workers I know worked at a store where they wouldn't tell workers they were suspended during their shift, nor via phone or the online scheduling system.

Many workers shared registers and shared duties, so multiple employees would often get suspended for the errors of one worker.

They'd drive 20/30 miles to work a "scheduled shift" only to be scolded, suspended and sent home with no pay.

Punishment in addition to 1 or 2 week suspensions was often a 1 month demotion to crappy jobs, fewer scheduled hours and crappy scheduled hours.

Many businesses effectively force workers to quit via suspensions, low scheduled hours, scheduled hours they can't work etc.

You have to be well liked by management to receive a decent amount of scheduled hours and/or better hours at many businesses.


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RE: Wage Theft

No... you have to stand up for your rights as a laborer.

And we wonder why so many people sign up for state or federal assistance...


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RE: Wage Theft

Many of the problems in the job market are abuse issues, not legal issues as mentioned in the link I posted.

If someone fights for their legal rights they better have savings, credit, other income streams or another job lined up since they're likely to become under-employed, blackballed, forced to quit etc.

Many live low wage paycheck to low wage paycheck and aren't willing to risk the consequences of fighting for their rights.


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"Weeks after President Barack Obama signed an executive order raising the minimum wage for federal contract workers to $10.10 an hour, the leaders of the Congressional Progressive Caucus are urging Labor Secretary Thomas Perez to crack down on wage theft among federal contractors. Applauding that executive order, Reps. Keith Ellison and Raul Grijalva and Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton went on to caution that "without stronger wage theft enforcement, these wage increases and overtime protections could be at risk." Cracking down on wage theft among federal contractors could make a real difference, they suggested in a letter to Perez, because:

Recent studies indicate that federal contractors are among America’s worst perpetrators of wage theft. A report by the Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions (HELP) Committee of the United States Senate revealed that 32 percent of the largest Department of Labor penalties for wage theft were levied against federal contractors. Similarly, a National Employment Law Project study found that nearly one in three low-wage contract workers in the DC metro area reported stolen wages. Contract workers at the Ronald Reagan Building and Union Station filed wage theft complaints alleging widespread violations of law among federal contractors, including being paid below the minimum wage, being forced to work off the clock, and not receiving time-and-a-half for overtime."

Here is a link that might be useful: Wage Theft Crackdown


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RE: Wage Theft

•Posted by jodik 5 (My Page) on Thu, Apr 3, 14 at 9:26

"No... you have to stand up for your rights as a laborer.
And we wonder why so many people sign up for state or federal assistance..."

I don't see the relationship between the two. Are you saying that if one is treated unfairly in the workplace, ze should quit the job and apply for public assistance? Or are you saying something else?
Another observation: I doubt anybody "wonders."


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RE: Wage Theft

Posted by jodik 5 (My Page) on
Thu, Apr 3, 14 at 9:26

No... you have to stand up for your rights as a laborer.

And we wonder why so many people sign up for state or federal assistance...

*

Ummm, cause they got mad at their employer and want someone else to support them?


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RE: Wage Theft

Speaking of public assistance, most of our employees on numerous welfare benefits have been on welfare since they started working.

When they quit, when they turn down hours/days/shifts, or when they're terminated many will apply for additional welfare benefits, plus hit up the food and goods distribution points more frequently and/or work under-the-table.

Many aren't worried about working few hours, getting fired and they're not afraid to quit due to the huge safety net in high paying welfare states like New York.

More and more are content working 1 $10 per hour part-time job (plus $X,000 tax credits) and/or under-the-table side jobs, then applying for Medicaid, food stamps, WIC, daycare, housing subsidies, HEAP, Emergency HEAP, free breakfasts/lunches free cell phones/minutes, local/private support etc.


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RE: Wage Theft

If you don't like your job, then quit. Slavery's been abolished in this country for more 150 years.

Hay


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RE: Wage Theft

You have the right to give up eating and sleeping in a house too. You can put your kids in foster care and steal yourself a shopping cart. The sky is the limit.


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RE: Wage Theft

Sure... you can slave away for theft of your wages, and never makes ends meet...

Or... there are a couple of choices, one not that much better than the next... or, you can work to survive for yourself.

Even if I could work a fulltime job, I refuse to give my loyalty, my time and energy, to some ass with one thing on his mind... profit at my expense. No thanks. There are options.


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RE: Wage Theft

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Fri, Apr 4, 14 at 14:16

Site is a real showcase of willfully ignorant statements.

Comment is not directed at post immediately preceding.


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RE: Wage Theft

How low do you want people to place themselves? Are we allowed no dignity?


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RE: Wage Theft

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Fri, Apr 4, 14 at 15:59

Who are you addressing? Note I specified I wasn't responding to a post very recently in the sequence - yours for instance.


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RE: Wage Theft

•Posted by jodik 5 (My Page) on Fri, Apr 4, 14 at 14:16

"Sure... you can slave away for theft of your wages, and never makes ends meet...
Or... there are a couple of choices, one not that much better than the next... or, you can work to survive for yourself."

Even if I could work a fulltime job, I refuse to give my loyalty, my time and energy, to some ass with one thing on his mind... profit at my expense. No thanks. There are options."

Yes, there are options. Don't work for an "ass" if you can avoid it. Get some training for work if you are capable of doing anything at all. If the ungrateful "ass," the employer who has no appreciation of your fine qualities (work ethics and all) has only "one thing in his mind," I rather doubt it is that he wishes to profit at "your expense."

Now I can't get that song out of my head: "Take This Job and Shove It."


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If any "motivated" low skilled worker I know were unhappy with their current pay, hours or working conditions, they'd have 1 or 2 additional jobs, or a full time replacement job in a week or two.

It's very hard to keep motivated workers, hence why you have to pay them well, treat them well and/or offer them perks to keep them.

Fortunately for employers we have an over-supply of unmotivated and very complacent workers that won't seriously look for better jobs.


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RE: Wage Theft

I wasn't addressing you, Bboy... we cross posted. Sorry about that.

I usually think of everything I want to say in one post... but this time, I had a footnote to add.


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RE: Wage Theft

bboy got himself all confused trying to avoid saying, "HAY".

It's easy to spell. H-A-Y. See?

"Fortunately for employers we have an over-supply of unmotivated and very complacent workers that won't seriously look for better jobs."

I listened to NPR last night. There was a segment about the joint venture between Ford and some Chinese car company at a plant in China. They interviewed one of the line workers. $2 AN HOUR! and he was thrilled to have the job!!!

Dignity, Jodi? The reality is, given the competition from these industrious Chinese, these people in the USA should be thrilled to work in the conditions they're offered.

Hay


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RE: Wage Theft

Be my guest, if you think we have no value as educated workers, aren't allowed the simple dignity offered by being valued as an employee... etc...

As for myself, I was taught better than that. I have worth. And I won't be exploited. I live in a first world country.


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RE: Wage Theft

For every local low skilled worker unhappy with their pay, hours and working conditions there are many more (often dozens) of equally, or better qualified workers that would be more than happy to take their place.


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RE: Wage Theft

" I have worth."

On the world market, that looks to be something less than $2 an hour. Be thankful for what you've got.

"I live in a first world country."

Be very thankful for what you've got. In a third world country you'd be in big trouble. Don't be so greedy.

Hay


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RE: Wage Theft

Greedy? I bet I live a simpler life than you just in terms of collected crap, Hay... ;-)

Where your sense of righteousness?


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RE: Wage Theft

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Sat, Apr 5, 14 at 13:44

Like I said, a showcase, due to there being multiple posts from more than one overbearing, zealout-style contributor much if not most of the time.


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