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Why oh Why Didn't Bloomburg ban stretch fabric on fat people

Posted by florey (My Page) on
Mon, Mar 31, 14 at 17:05

Now he's lost his chance.

Gee, if we ever needed a nanny state for something, it would be banning clothes made of stretch fabric. OK OK, how about over size 5? Summer is coming and with it the onset of being confronted with the visions of doublewides, in stretch. 300 pounders are coming. Whyyy? what did we do wrong? to be punished in this way?

Talk about waaay too much information. WAaaaaaay WAAAaaaaaAAAaaaaay too much.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Why oh Why Didn't Bloomburg ban stretch fabric on fat people

  • Posted by momj47 7A..was 6B (My Page) on
    Mon, Mar 31, 14 at 18:26

I think it should be banned for everybody. It flatters very few people.

Given enough time in office, maybe he would have!

This post was edited by momj47 on Mon, Mar 31, 14 at 18:27


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RE: Why oh Why Didn't Bloomburg ban stretch fabric on fat people

The city in which I live was voted 3rd worst dressed city in the world because of our propensity for wearing yoga pants as every day wear. There was a call to stop wearing them - didn't happen. Everybody wears them regardless of their size.

Here is a link that might be useful: stretchy yoga wear


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RE: Why oh Why Didn't Bloomburg ban stretch fabric on fat people

So we're mainly dissing women who are too big for their britches here...


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RE: Why oh Why Didn't Bloomburg ban stretch fabric on fat people

The city in which I live was voted 3rd worst dressed city in the world . . .

Phew, El Lay didn't make the list!

Those well-dressed industry people made up for the rest of us louts in flip flops, tees, and faded (not in a fashionable way) shorts/pants .


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RE: Why oh Why Didn't Bloomburg ban stretch fabric on fat people

  • Posted by momj47 7A..was 6B (My Page) on
    Mon, Mar 31, 14 at 19:48

So we're mainly dissing women

No, men in bike shorts, too. Most of them haven't been near a bike in years.

Then there are Speedos.


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RE: Why oh Why Didn't Bloomburg ban stretch fabric on fat people

Ooh, eilviess.!
Uh, No, not just that, tops too,
How about the 45 year old woman in a pink, tank top, who was showing off her 4 and 5 rolls of side fat. That's what there was, rolls of side fat.

How about, at least, worn loosely?
and not over age 23?

Please, nooo, people will see you wearing that. Really.


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RE: Why oh Why Didn't Bloomburg ban stretch fabric on fat people

Hey florey, is your other name lily?


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RE: Why oh Why Didn't Bloomburg ban stretch fabric on fat people

Spandex is a privilege, not a right... ;-)


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RE: Why oh Why Didn't Bloomburg ban stretch fabric on fat people

Maybe we could use the spandex to put over the eyes of those who think they are better than the heavier people. At least I didn't say mouths!

;)


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RE: Why oh Why Didn't Bloomburg ban stretch fabric on fat people

As long as I don't have to see actual body parts showing through heavily stretched, thin material... who cares?

I wear what I wear... and I don't care what anyone else thinks. I'm not exposing myself.


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RE: Why oh Why Didn't Bloomburg ban stretch fabric on fat people

florey has been around since 2006......

I am constantly amazed at what people of all ages, sexes and sizes put on each morning, including hairdos and makeup, look in the mirror and say "That's a a wrap"

I really don't care but I must admit to a few disbelieving head shakes now and then


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RE: Why oh Why Didn't Bloomburg ban stretch fabric on fat people

Personally, I really don't care how anyone looks... what they wear... and I'm not going out of my way to stand on ceremony and be uncomfortable just because of what a bunch of strangers might think.

Make up? None... allergic to a lot of it, and not unafraid to show my own complexion.

Fancy duds? Nope. Not happening. I want comfort above all. I have a hard enough time getting around without feeling trussed up like a Thanksgiving turkey! I can't deal with tight or constricting clothing against my back.

What do I wear? On an average day, you might see me in a t-shirt with a cut open neckline, jeans or loose pants or shorts, a leather biker jacket and boots if it's cold, or sandals if not. I own an average of 3 dressy outfits and a pair of heels for fancy occasions, but I hate to dress up.

You're more likely to see me with long hair twisted and piled up or pulled back so it's not in my eyes.

I value comfort and ease of movement above all else... anything else is just painful. And if you see my tattoos or piercings, too bad... look elsewhere if it offends thee.


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RE: Why oh Why Didn't Bloomburg ban stretch fabric on fat people

I figure if Bloomburg could ban more freedoms he would, based on his personal sensibilities.

That is scarier than rolls of fat in Spandex.

I think it is interesting to people watch, and to note the differences in different locales. You can usually learn a lot about a person by the way they dress. It's interesting to me, but I do not care as long as they're not lewd, and even then it's more a spectacle and rather sad, than offensive. Spandex tube tops and short shorts worn by obese people are the biggest crimes around here. Pretty much I think they're a crime worn by anyone unless they're working in their garden, yard, or at the beach!

I like to dress well but as we age most of us find comfort more important--particularly when it comes to footwear. I'm a believer that it is even more important for women--and men--to look their best as they age. It's an inspiration to see an older woman wearing beautiful bright colors and luxurious and interestingly tailored fabrics, silk scarves, or even jeans and a denim shirt with gray hair and a turquoise necklace and cowboy boots, with the grace of age and wisdom and experience and a sparkle still in their eyes. I love to see older men in a suit and tie, in jeans and a starched shirt, or in slacks and a sweater vest--even in their eighties and nineties.

Attention to their dress and pride in their appearance indicates they're still in the game and care about themselves and how others view them.

It's sad to see someone who just doesn't care.
Of course their choice in the end it doesn't matter if it doesn't matter to them.


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RE: Why oh Why Didn't Bloomburg ban stretch fabric on fat people

"I figure if Bloomburg could ban more freedoms he would, based on his personal sensibilities.
That is scarier than rolls of fat in Spandex."

I would agree. Beyond public indecency, everyone has the right to dress in the mode of their personal choice... whether others approve or not. It would be scary, indeed, to be told what to wear and what not to wear.

Pride, on the other hand, is a matter of personal opinion and choice. Just because I don't care to wear makeup, or dress up in skirts and suits to please those around me doesn't mean I don't care about my personal appearance.

In fact, I care more about my personal health and well being than I do about what others think of my wardrobe choices.

Like I said... if I don't visually please you, turn away. You are under no obligation to look, or to comment.


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RE: Why oh Why Didn't Bloomburg ban stretch fabric on fat people

Amish.


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RE: Why oh Why Didn't Bloomburg ban stretch fabric on fat people

jeans and a denim shirt with gray hair and a turquoise necklace and cowboy boots,

That sounds like nothing more than a costume.


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RE: Why oh Why Didn't Bloomburg ban stretch fabric on fat people

Posted by epiphyticlvr 10 (My Page) on
Tue, Apr 1, 14 at 11:17

jeans and a denim shirt with gray hair and a turquoise necklace and cowboy boots,

That sounds like nothing more than a costume.

*

Maybe in New York.

Not an older woman living and working on a ranch in New Mexico, where I have lived and seen women dressed this way, functional, simple, and classy.

Now--talk about costumes--NYC and LA take the cake--so many people vying for attention in their "costumes."


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RE: Why oh Why Didn't Bloomburg ban stretch fabric on fat people

Costumes Si, nylon knit No!

Thanks momj, i was writing when you posted. It's not a one side of the population issue.

Stretch is self expression, but one which changes the expressions of others, but not in a good way.
(: O0O ):

When you think about the discussion, that came after Mayor Bloomburg tried to ban big drinks, it was really valuable. It never would have passed.
But it still provides a frame of reference.


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RE: Why oh Why Didn't Bloomburg ban stretch fabric on fat people

I have to admit that there are days when I leave the house thinking I look ok wearing my standard - jeans, colourful t-shirt, shoes and socks, nice jacket, clean and brushed hair. BUT, then I happen to catch myself in a store window as I'm walking by and thinking to myself - "what the he!! was I thinking when I walked out of the house". But I have little sense of style so it's a case of whatever.

I do think that a lot of people see what they want to see when they look in their mirrors at home or in the mirrors in change rooms in the malls.

But, you won;t find me wearing stretchy spandex on this 60 year old body even though it is in shape.


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RE: Why oh Why Didn't Bloomburg ban stretch fabric on fat people

Beauty is cultural and in some cultures rolls of fat are considered very attractive. To think they are not makes you culturally limited.

Going back through history plumpness emphasized was considered way more attractive than thin. Our ideal beauties of today would be considered to be pathetically plain. Even during the vertical early middle ages people were portrayed with what we would consider to be alarmingly unattractive paunches. Based on portraits by Holbein the beauties of his day(early 1500s) had double chins. We haven't even gotten to the seriously plump Victorian age where dimples at your finger joints and elbows was consistently praised in literature.


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RE: Why oh Why Didn't Bloomburg ban stretch fabric on fat people

That's interesting, and so true.
Fat IS big when those other people are starving.
It is also big afterwards, when We are showing off that we have enough to eat.
Fat babies are from cultures of people whose families can remember the lean times, especially around wars, and industrialization.
Nowadays, there are other factors to weight gain.

Ask Dickens if everyone was eating well in the 19th.
Makeup goes light or dark culturally too. The white lead used on faces, in Elizabethan times was meant to emphasize - we haven't red skin from working in fields.

Not every display of cultural differences is a great idea. - want to try some of this pretty make up? white lead with vermillion!

I just hope that rolls of displayed fat, plays out soon as a style.
Chubby is fine with me. Straining at being noticed, not so much.


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RE: Why oh Why Didn't Bloomburg ban stretch fabric on fat people

jeans and a denim shirt with gray hair and a turquoise necklace and cowboy boots,

You better stay away from Santa Fe. And you left out, red skin.


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RE: Why oh Why Didn't Bloomburg ban stretch fabric on fat people

If we really want to talk ugly we ought to talk about shoes-those strappy skimpy things with high heels where women's feet bulge out all over the edges. Get thee a fashion magazine and ignore the artfully arranged model's body and look at the feet in their frequently too small or too large shoes. Misshapen toes poking out, heels hanging off the back, bunions? I see women in stores scraping along in shoes they are about to fall out of and think-what are you thinking. I am not a fan of the cowboy boot-they look silly to me but at least they cover up the damage.


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RE: Why oh Why Didn't Bloomburg ban stretch fabric on fat people

I must not be too interested in body types - wrapped in spandex or otherwise. Don't know what the upshot of the thread is since it doesn't make reference or link to the usual "People of Walmart" sites to illustrate any point.

Maybe instead of fading away, we're heading into another era where “Rubenesque” will again be a fashionable term to describe plump, voluptuous, curvaceous women in a flattering way. The only thing missing would be the "flattering" way, I'm afraid.


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RE: Why oh Why Didn't Bloomburg ban stretch fabric on fat people

And now, in spray on!

Here is a link that might be useful: of course, it is the 1st…..


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RE: Why oh Why Didn't Bloomburg ban stretch fabric on fat people

NYC and LA take the cake--so many people vying for attention in their "costumes."

They are creating jobs in the local sweat shops fashion industry. Or they are in the fashion industry.


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RE: Why oh Why Didn't Bloomburg ban stretch fabric on fat people

Using the restroom could be problematic. Purse sized touch up can for a bit less than the $1200. (Or would it be two cans for only additional P&H like on late nite TV?)

Here's the Huffington post full spoof with Jimmy Kimmel video... which is pretty funny.

Here is a link that might be useful: Yep


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RE: Why oh Why Didn't Bloomburg ban stretch fabric on fat people

And here I was thinking using the restroom wouldn't be problematic enough...


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RE: Why oh Why Didn't Bloomburg ban stretch fabric on fat people

Actually, I'm a little perturbed that the focus seems to be aimed at the overweight, since that isn't anything but a personal prejudice rising out of the OP...

What does weight have to do with spandex, anyway? If the way someone dresses bothers you, don't look. The joke about spandex being a privilege and not a right is just that... a little humor floating around the web, hence the included wink.

New York and LA are hot spots for the fashion industry... they always have been. So, it wouldn't be unusual to see the more outrageous or forward fashion statements in those cities.


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RE: Why oh Why Didn't Bloomburg ban stretch fabric on fat people

Gouge your eyes out so you won't have to look!
Lack of boundaries!


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RE: Why oh Why Didn't Bloomburg ban stretch fabric on fat people

New York and LA are hot spots for the fashion industry... they always have been. So, it wouldn't be unusual to see the more outrageous or forward fashion statements in those cities.

Oh Jodi, as we all know it was just a feeble attempt at trying to insult those of us from both coasts. I just take it from whence it comes. Some don't let silly facts like that get in the way,

This post was edited by epiphyticlvr on Tue, Apr 1, 14 at 17:28


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RE: Why oh Why Didn't Bloomburg ban stretch fabric on fat people

as if you or Nancy can afford those fashions. A $10,000 top? I doubt it.


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RE: Why oh Why Didn't Bloomburg ban stretch fabric on fat people

Well, there is this.

Here is a link that might be useful: Groan


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RE: Why oh Why Didn't Bloomburg ban stretch fabric on fat people

There sure is a lot of vile human nature being exposed in this thread!


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RE: Why oh Why Didn't Bloomburg ban stretch fabric on fat people

brush, you've provided us with a perfect example of a straw-man argument. Thank you.


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RE: Why oh Why Didn't Bloomburg ban stretch fabric on fat people

Why thank you for the info chase.

Do you know what florey's BMI is?


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RE: Why oh Why Didn't Bloomburg ban stretch fabric on fat people

I defy you to look away from the visual pidge gave us! It would be like trying to ignore a car accident right there in front of you. How can you help NOT look?

And who invents these "fashion statements"?

Kate


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RE: Why oh Why Didn't Bloomburg ban stretch fabric on fat people

When that pic showed up on my Facebook, kate, I thought I would gag! Imagine if one of those straps gave way.
Ewwwww!


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RE: Why oh Why Didn't Bloomburg ban stretch fabric on fat people

Back to the OP...what is the point here? Like I said at 19:27, it seems to be about women who are too big for their britches, but after reading the posts that came after mine, it's pretty much a not-so-funny thread making fun of people who have the nerve to show up in public dressed in a way that is aesthetically displeasing to some.

Maybe I should start a thread about how people with bad teeth are ridiculous if they like to smile.

The worst offenders on this thread are some of the very same posters who toot their own horns about how kind and compassionate they are. Shame on you; you know who you are.

Or you should, unless you are so self-absorbed that this concept eludes you.


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RE: Why oh Why Didn't Bloomburg ban stretch fabric on fat people

a feeble attempt at trying to insult those of us from both coasts

Dogtown isn't Dog Patch.


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RE: Why oh Why Didn't Bloomburg ban stretch fabric on fat people

brush, you've provided us with a perfect example of a straw-man argument. Thank you.

Not to mention what a bizarre statement. As if Brush knows what anyones finances are.


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RE: Why oh Why Didn't Bloomburg ban stretch fabric on fat people

"Maybe I should start a thread about how people with bad teeth are ridiculous if they like to smile."

Elvis, +1

(never thought I'd be saying that.)


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RE: Why oh Why Didn't Bloomburg ban stretch fabric on fat people

ELVIS +2


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RE: Why oh Why Didn't Bloomburg ban stretch fabric on fat people

Posted by epiphyticlvr (My Page) on
Tue, Apr 1, 14 at 17:10

New York and LA are hot spots for the fashion industry... they always have been. So, it wouldn't be unusual to see the more outrageous or forward fashion statements in those cities.

Oh Jodi, as we all know it was just a feeble attempt at trying to insult those of us from both coasts. I just take it from whence it comes. Some don't let silly facts like that get in the way,

*

No, that is not correct, Epi.

New Orleans also fits that bill, as does Vegas and a few other places.

My response was to your comment:

Posted by epiphyticlvr 10 (My Page) on
Tue, Apr 1, 14 at 11:17

(Demi)
"jeans and a denim shirt with gray hair and a turquoise necklace and cowboy boots",

That sounds like nothing more than a costume."

*

That description of mine was not a costume, but real clothes worn by people doing work.

I see more costumes in LA and New York, and yes, New Orleans, than the outfit I described.

Of course your nasty speculation about why I answered your smarmy post to begin with is uncalled for, but predictable.


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RE: Why oh Why Didn't Bloomburg ban stretch fabric on fat people

Personally, I would not wear shorts in public since I suspect my gnarly knees are an affront to public decency.....and as for my middle-aged arse (that would surely be an arrestable offence)....but by the same token, I am appalled at the dire clothing choices people wear, regardless of shape or size.....with an especial loathing for the spandex-clad joggers barrelling along the roads, barging, shoving and generally acting as though the pavements are theirs alone. Do it in the privacy of your yards, please.
Yes, I do a fair bit of averting my eyes.

On a more serious level, obesity is not and should not be normalised. 1 in 3 children in the UK are overweight. Whilst I agree that shaming and finger-pointing is merely hurtful and destructive, we do need a wider attempt at reducing sugars, cutting out the fizzy drink consumption and attempting a more pro-active hit against the processed and fast food lobbies which are poisoning our children. Obviously, there are issues of personal responsibility here.....but poverty, education and choice have roles to play in ensuring a fit populace.


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RE: Why oh Why Didn't Bloomburg ban stretch fabric on fat people

I would agree that no one should help subsidize obesity... or normalize it... it is unhealthy.

But by the same token, we shouldn't use weight against people, either. It is destructive and hurtful.

Pidge, I wouldn't wear or recommend wearing such items of questionable clothing, as pictured in your link... but I don't think I'd condemn anyone else for such a choice. Everyone has a personal sense of flavor and style.

As different as I am, there isn't much that offends me... people can try, but...


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