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Weather Report

Posted by althea z4 MN (My Page) on
Thu, Mar 22, 12 at 17:31

I think we had another record warm day today during the midwest early summer. Last week I planted spinach and pea seeds, and some potatoes. The peas and spinach are up. It's awfully strange to be out in a t-shirt in June temperatures with the wind through the leafless trees carrying the eerie sound of winter. We had our first thunderstorm too.

This is what it looks like as temp records all over are being broken.

"Yesterday, meteorologist Masters published a detailed statistical analysis that concluded, “It is highly unlikely the warmth of the current ‘Summer in March’ heat wave could have occurred unless the climate was warming.”

How's the weather in your area?

Here is a link that might be useful: think progress


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Weather Report

I'm a little freaked out that the normal growth and bloom sequence is out of order in my yard.


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RE: Weather Report

It was 83 degrees Fahrenheit here in Portland Maine today. Ludicrous temperature for this time & place.


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RE: Weather Report

Same temperature as here in the Tampa Bay area. That's very weird.


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Pollen count in north Georgia was in the 9000's which is a record and about 2-3 weeks early. Also a record for consecutive days of 80+ degree days.


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It was a very mild winter here and we had one snow storm..on October 30th when leaves were still on the trees. It caused much damage to our trees as well as almost everyone's. For the past month we have been 10-35 degrees above normal every day. It has been in the 70's and 80's for ten days.Normal is 49 and 50. Our trees are leafing out and the daffodils are almost over. I had my forsythia blooming in what was still winter last week. We are in a drought now as well and last year we were 30 inches above normal...71 inches for the year. Forest fire danger is extreme.

Ricky Santorum speaking in Gettysburg the other night where people were milling out side in shirt sleeves said global warming was a liberal myth. Al Gore is having the last laugh.


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75 degrees today in cental NJ. I love warm weather, but this is just weird.


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It was 26 C here in Quebec yesterday although it is cooler today so we are expecting snow by the middle of next week! It is great to get so much done in the garden before the mossies get with the programme but it is kind of exhausting too eh? with it happening so soon.


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RE: Weather Report

  • Posted by ohiomom 3rdrockfromthesun (My Page) on
    Thu, Mar 22, 12 at 18:04

.....the winter that wasn't has become the spring that is summer and I sowed spinach and lettuce, tossing some peas in the dirt this weekend. My sage (I have a container garden on the roof) never died this winter.

We are hitting 80 and above the past week, 70's before that !! Rain and cooler temps (but still above normal) for the next week.

We are supposed to have snow/ice and cold March winds .. helloo ??


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I'll be prepping the mower later today. This is crazy.


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RE: Weather Report

  • Posted by vgkg 7-Va Tidewater (My Page) on
    Thu, Mar 22, 12 at 18:23

Now ya gone and done it Lily, mentioning "Al Gore" rings the magic bell...

#107

Same here in central Va, 80's in March. Tomato plants were on sale here 2 weeks ago, unheard of that early. Got 2 hail storm days in a row, marble/nickel size, it's extremely rare here even once. Pollen ready to explode any minute, esp pines. All fruit trees in full or past bloom except the apples. Hope this heat pattern breaks before the "real" summer hits. If it hails again it will at least beat the pollen out of the cones all at once and drown it in the rain.


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Along with flooding and very early, very nasty tornadoes. Gonna be another wild year.


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Love it. Yard work is done!


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RE: Weather Report

Must be nice, alas, taxes call before finishing yardwork.

Two years of serious drought have produced Hypoxylon canker
which has killed twenty-five oak trees on my property; they have to be cut and stumps grinded and removed.

After that is done I can finish the vegetable garden which has been tilled after four years of neglect and get that planted, as well as the flower gardens.

I ordered and just received two chinquipin trees but I've never grown those before, I hope they make it.

We have had rain this week and some flooding.
Today is gorgeous, but windy.

Forecast for the weekend is warm--a good thing because crawfish season is in full swing.

Spring is definitely two weeks ahead of schedule here.


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Blood root over & finished, crocus over & finished, Magnolias exploded last week a about 3-4 weeks early. The ones in Washington square are already dropping their petals. Cornelian Cherry Dogwood already finished Usually peek march 31 to April 5. Previous Years Magnolias peek around 2nd to 3rd week of April. Weeping pea nearly finished usually another mid April bloomer.
I've been out in shorts & t shirt the last couple of days! We haven't had much rain though everything is so dry.
It was 81 today & will be 75 tomorrow thast very warm for NY this time of year.


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Taxes AND spring yard cleanup AND planting are all done here.

I'm still debating putting the winter clothes away, though...

Our trees need the water that snow cover didn't provide,,,


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Now, I won't have to move to Florida to retire. Near 80 today, near 80 tomorrow with Caribbean skies. Some parts of the country and the planet are gonna get the shaft though--in the USA, mostly in the so-called RED states that tend not to pay all that much attention to science or facts anyway.


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Red Meanies in Blue States

in the USA, mostly in the so-called RED states that tend not to pay all that much attention to science or facts anyway.

*

Gee, I guess I need to cancel Discover and Science Digest magazines in order to fit your prejudiced stereotype!

Seems like the RED is all in your meanies, Miss Holly!


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RE: Weather Report2

After you finish reading your mags, do us all a favor and lend them to your literate neighbors.


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Hot here! High 70's to upper 80's this week. I was forced to charge the chiller on Tuesday, almost 30 days earlier than the past 12 years. The tenants were wilting.

I missed winter pruning this year since I usually do it in early March. By then the sap was running. So shearing will have do this summer.

Magnolia blooms are on the ground.
Lawn got its first cut today.
Spread the corn gluten meal today. (rain tomorrow)
Weeping cherry; crabs, and forsythia are in bloom here.

The dwarf fruit trees are in bloom and the bees are busy.

A rabbit is preparing a nesting place in the front yard!!


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I find it pretty alarming.

It is clear that as climate warms in the north evaporation of soil and surface water before trees and shrubs leaf-out will be a problem. Water supplies will decrease as irrigation for crops will increase. Spring crop cultivation will need to be done more carefully. This is a clear example of what scientists have been saying, a negative climate shift impact (evaporation and drying) is happening orders of magnitude faster than plants can adapt, in this case by changing their times of leaf-drop and leaf-flush.


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Being rural, we're behind the local towns in blooming trees, though the redbud is gorgeous, the lilacs nice but meager, and tulips, daffodils, muscari, scilla, and hyacinths have all appeared.

My pink and star magnolias are in bud, as are the peony trees, a few clematis. The forsythia is dropping blooms already, but the daffodils are in full swing. Roses all have good sized leaves already, creeping phlox is beginning to bud up and bloom, and the viburnum is loaded with green buds.

I did manage to get one large bed cleaned up, and half the yard picked up of large branches so I can mow. I need a new body, 6 arms, and 4 more of me... so I don't have to babysit anyone.


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Evidently the jet stream was locked into a position that gave us our fourth warmest winter in history. We usually have pretty mild temps so not much of a change for us. But might mean a bad storm season this year.


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The temp hit 80 here last week when it was still winter. This is the first time ever that MN reached 80 before Las Vegas.

I was shocked to see magnolias in bloom today. The trees are budding. Hope there isn't a hard frost in store that could kill the new leaves. If that happens, a hot summer will be unbearable.

Vgkg, do have 107 more GW threads to go before we're toast?


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RE: Weather Report

  • Posted by natal Louisiana 8b (My Page) on
    Thu, Mar 22, 12 at 20:59

We usually have pretty mild temps so not much of a change for us.

I'm just down the road and it's a different story. Azaleas bloomed at least a month earlier than normal. Humidity kicked in early and a/c has been on since February. Typically it's not needed until late April/early May.


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  • Posted by ohiomom 3rdrockfromthesun (My Page) on
    Thu, Mar 22, 12 at 21:38

"like" Natal's post :)


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I don't know whether to feel jealous or thankful. We are having a colder than normal March. Spring came in February and winter came back in March. No gardening yet here. Maybe things will get better soon so I can plant lettuce, spinace, radishes and peas. I have the seeds - I'm just waiting for temps to get in the 50s and 60s.


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We had our summer 2011 weather in fall and winter 2012. Then alternating warm and unseasonable cool temperatures.

Last year my California poppies didn't bloom until late July because of the cool weather. This year they're already blooming - maybe a little ahead of schedule for coastal SoCal. Narcissus was early as usual - blooming in January. I was thrilled that the recently planted redbud bloomed this year.

Last week was very chilly for us - highs in the mid-to-high 50s and lows into the 40s (please don't laugh) and the weather was everyone's favorite topic. Our winter arrived in March.


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230 tornadoes in Jan and Feb 2012. Off to another record!!

Here is a link that might be useful: link


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I think we're in for a rough year weather wise, particularly in tornado alley. Last year was freaky here with a very cold and very dry winter, followed by a tornado two miles away in April, next an earthquake, July full of 100 plus days and no rain and then the rains came in the form of hurricanes and tropical depressions causing massive flooding. Now no rain OR snow this year and weeks of summer(not spring temps). My magnolia is done and petals are on the ground. Daffs are over, and trees are budding. My husband the forester's rule is(was) the trees are full leaf by May 1st. This year, try April first. >>Sorry about your tree loss , Demi. I hate when that happens. Our magnolia is the ugliest one in town now thanks to the October snow storm when the leaves were still on. Many branches broke off, but it's very old , so I kept it. What bloomed was beautiful though.


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I have lost track of how many changes in phenology of plants and animals I've seen over the past decade or two. Nancy and I share the same weather patterns, living as we do less than 80 miles distant, as the crow flies. I dread the coming later spring and summer months of overcast and dank days as the marine layer is pulled hard onto the coast and into coastal valleys.

It used to be the norm for soils to warm to greater than 70F by late May but this past couple of years my soils haven't reached that threshold until late June to early July. Try growing heat-loving crops in such cool soils.

Winter weeds, esp. annual blue grass, did not stop germinating until later July and the normal roster of summer weeds did not peak until well into Sept.

Well, here it is not even April and my deciduous fruit orchard of many low-chill varieties has largely finished flowering with the exception of some notably late bloomers. I have peaches the size of grapes and apples the size of golf balls.

Ixia and glads started blooming this week, a good month earlier than normal for here. Tulips and daffodils/narcissus are mostly done.

The monarch butterflies did very well this winter in our stand of Eucalyptus and Australian native species. They have already migrated back north, the timing at least two weeks earlier than in prior years. The monarchs were sustained in the weeks before migration by earlier-than-normal blooming of Echium and for their larvae by milkweeds that did not go dormant this winter.

Nahhhh, these high points are not related to climate change/global warming...just coincidences.


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RE: Monarch Weather Report

Oh, I forgot to mention the most extraordinary sight of thousands of monarchs sipping on fruit tree flowers, like the trees were sporting orange and black flowers. I never recall seeing so many butterflies in the orchard, but then who expects to see a coinciding of flowering and monarchs?


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I put my snow shovel away yesterday. Hope Mommy Nature didn't see me, as she would probably punish me for this hubris...


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Didn't think we were that far apart natal. My azaleas have just finished, my paperwhites and snowdrops bloomed the end of January as usual, my roses are into their spring flush and my pecan trees are beginning to bud. Though we have had warmer temps this year, the pecan trees are my barometer that says no more chance of winter. Last year we had a nice cool spring, this year a much warmer one. The only unusual thing I've seen is lot's more honeybee's, which I am very happy about.


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RE: Weather Report

"Nahhhh, these high points are not related to climate change/global warming...just coincidences."

Yeah... nothing to worry about... let's just keep allowing the total destruction of our planet so the next generation doesn't have one that's habitable.

How can anyone seriously consider current happenings and think humankind had nothing to do with it?


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RE: Weather Report

The evidence in support of these predictions has now begun to accumulate so massively that meteorologists are hard-pressed to keep up with it. In England, farmers have seen their growing season decline by about two weeks since 1950, with a resultant overall loss in grain production estimated at up to 100,000 tons annually.

During the same time, the average temperature around the equator has risen by a fraction of a degree � a fraction that in some areas can mean drought and desolation. Last April, in the most devastating outbreak of tornadoes ever recorded, 148 twisters killed more than 300 people and caused half a billion dollars� worth of damage in 13 U.S. states.

Follow the money!!

Here is a link that might be useful: link


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Ah yes, Reid Bryson is still trying to live down his prediction of the coming ice age. I TA'd for one of his very skeptical colleagues at the time at Wisconsin. Bryson was in the minority then, and today is among the few skeptics still in the climatological field.


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RE: Weather Report

Mrskjun, are you serious? A 30+ year-old story?

"One of the main pillars of global warming denial rests on the shoulders of "The Cooling World" by Peter Gwynne in the April 28, 1975 issueof Newsweek. Interest in the 34 year old story prompted the editor to call it "the most-cited single-page story in our history." The editor then noted, "Global warming soon led scientists to put such concerns aside, but those who doubt that greenhouse gases are causing significant climate change have long pointed to the 1975 NEWSWEEK piece as an example of how wrong journalists and researchers can be."
George Will has invoked the story at least five times in his columns; it has been used by everyone from Rush Limbaugh to The Economist, and Dennis Miller even brought a copy of the magazine on the Tonight Show. And, according to Gwynne, I am the second person in the last 34 years to ask the author specifically about the piece. He responded by email:
Thank you for your note. You've hit on a point that has bugged me for a few years now, ever since I learned that the deniers of global warming were using my Newsweek piece to support their position. As you correctly point out, the article summarized the science of the time. Since then, numerous climate-sensing satellites have gone into orbit and theoretical understanding of atmospheric chemistry has improved considerably. I have occasionally thought of publishing an update to the article, but I�ve always decided that such an action would garner unwanted notoriety without changing any minds."

(snip)
Yet, it is the "Cooling" story that has gotten the most attention. "I think it was brought to my attention maybe five years ago," Gwynne says. "I don�t know how long it was going on."
"As I recall, there were a few people around and general announcements in the journals," Gwynne said. "It followed a complicated winter, where temperature in Anchorage was above that in Miami, and that sort of set us thinking, so I started looking at the literature and talking to some of the people in the field." From that, he says, he says he did indeed find that at least the majority in the climatology business did think the world was cooling, so he got the bureau in Newsweek to talk to people involved which was a typical way of doing things at the time. Bureau reporters did some of the longer interviews.
Gwynne doesn�t have a problem with Newsweek�s revisit the article that declared, "the story wasn't �wrong� in the journalistic sense of �inaccurate.�" Indeed, at the time, not only were there some papers suggesting cooling, but the Earth had been cooling from the 40s through the 70s.
Gwynne says, "It was at the time an accurate representation of what was going on in the field. It was an accurate representation of what climatologists believed, and what was actually happening."
(snip)
Gwynne remembers there were studies that demonstrated concern about the food supply. "Again, it was not any sort of immediate concern the way global warming is now," he says.
In grand scheme of things, the cooling was just an interesting little weather story that quickly disappeared. "I don�t think at the time anybody took all that much notice of it because it didn�t portend all the impending disaster the way global warming now does," Gwynne says.
If Gwynne had it to do over again, is there anything he would have changed?
"I think possibly the only thing would be to add, �These things are never fixed in stone, the fact that there has been cooling in the early part of the century doesn�t mean that will continue,� but I could have written that on the end of any science story I ever wrote. That�s kind of the nature of science and that�s why I ultimately decided not to do it."

Here is a link that might be useful: source


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"Nahhhh, these high points are not related to climate change/global warming...just coincidences."

As recently as 10 to 20,000 years ago, I'd be sitting here under a mile of ice as I type. Things could be worse.

The jet stream favored us on this side of the earth this year. Quit your complaining: In the Ukraine they were freezing to death this year.

Be nice. Only say sweet things about Mother Nature.

Personally, I blame the speculators in the Weather Futures market. It's clear to anyone with an ounce of common sense that the market needs regulating!!

Hay


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They were freezing in Argentina during their past winter as well. Weather weather weather deflect deflect deflect.

20,000 years ago I'd be living in Mexico all by myself, possibly. My old piece of the Pacific Plate has been chugging northbynorthwest for some time.


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RE: Weather Report

  • Posted by vgkg 7-Va Tidewater (My Page) on
    Fri, Mar 23, 12 at 10:06

Althea, the timing is that when GW thread #0 is reached the northern icecap will be totally melted during that summer. Back when I started the countdown at #300 I was estimating 10 GW threads per year over the next 30 years, which was based at that time on climate scientists prediction of the total ice melt by the year 2040 or so. Since then that estimated timing has shrunk and our related threads have picked up pace faster then 10/year (mainly thanks in the past to swanz and others). It still seems to be on track.


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RE: Weather Report

20,000 years ago, I would have been rodeo riding a mastodon, trying to rope a saber tooth tiger.

"And out of chute Number One, ....."


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RE: Weather Report

Here in coastal SC we've been wearing sandals and shorts intermittently since February. The new leaves on the trees behind where I live look the way they are supposed to be in May, not March. The azaleas have been in flower for a month, as have the roses. Now the wistaria is starting up. We really only had about 6-8 days of cold, windy weather this past winter, unlike last winter here.This week I turned on my a.c. for the first time since October. Temps have been in the 70's and low 80's for several weeks. It's a bit eerie, as I was used to long, slow, late springs until I relocated. I wonder if this is a harbinger of a hurricane-filled summer and fall on the East Coast.


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RE: Weather Report

  • Posted by ohiomom 3rdrockfromthesun (My Page) on
    Fri, Mar 23, 12 at 10:56

So just came back from my myriad errands here in my hood ... the magnolias have bloomed and are dropping all their petals, the azalea are blooming as are the cherry trees (ornamental and fruit) ... the landscape crews are out cutting grass. Flowers flowers everywhere and I can so unequivocally that this is NOT NORMAL for my neck of the woods. Just left the bank and they have the A/C on.

Sleeping with windows open ... in MARCH ? Definitely not near normal here in my city by the lake.


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About 20,000 years ago, I would have been glacier surfing.

We had a mild winter; about 40" under the normal snowfall. We did make up about 20" in the early march blizzard plus more in the shortly following two events. I happen to be in a narrow "snow belt" so I tend to get more than is officially reported. Now it's fairly warm (for here) with fog and drizzle.

The leaf buds on the lilacs are breaking, grass is greening but no signs of the scilla or other early spring bulbs.


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RE: Weather Report

20,000 years ago I'd have been sitting here a couple hundred miles from the ocean. In the other direction, ice. Would have been a great opportunity to buy a ton of real-estate ice-cheap, huh, Hayski? Could have bought all of modern CT for a can of propane with a roaster attached.

If only people would bother to do a little reading about geology and sunspots and whatnot and they would find that concerns about cycling into the next glacial maximum were not so far-fetched. In fact, what is going on now with the global warming amounts to a temporary delaying action of out-of-human-control forces.


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RE: Weather Report

Well, you folks can sit here and argue in cyberspace all you want about the causes. Meanwhile, kiss all of the fruit crop in Michigan goodbye. Full bloom brought about by record warmth followed by a couple of nights of hard freezes next week.

I don't care what caused it, it stinks. My only hope is that the unusually warm waters of Lake Huron might brew up some nocturnal clouds that come down out of the thumb and save my own personal orchard, letting it squeak by in the low 30s.


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RE: Weather Report

The early fruit tree blooming followed by hard frosts is now becoming the norm out here. This year, my trees haven't bloomed yet, but its just a matter of days.

The Maine maple sugar harvest took it on the chin as well, the winter was just too warm ...."Eisentraut said he generally starts putting taps in the trees at about March 1, and the season would run for about three to four weeks. This year, that's been cut in half.

Harvesting maple syrup requires alternating subfreezing and thawing temperatures to continue the sap flow.

Peterson said he's never seen a season like this in the 40 years he's been harvesting.

The weather will cost him this year - ordinarily, he would produce about 200 gallons of syrup in a season, worth about $10,000. This year, he'll have 50 gallons, worth only $2,500.

Here is a link that might be useful: maple syrup issues


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RE: Weather Report

I'm noticing various items in my gardens blooming out of normal sequence, and it's more than a little disturbing.

We barely had a winter to speak of, and I didn't have to shovel snow. I thought I might have to for a moment, there... but it melted quickly.

Last winter, and every one I can remember, we've been up to our thighs in drifting snow that required the kind of shoveling that often causes heart attacks! I think I used salt once on a small icy patch near the garage door this past winter.

Usually, I look forward to the insulating blanket of snow that protects our rose gardens and other perennials from the harm of frigid winds, but there was none... snow, that is. We still got a short period of frigid winds.

It's just been so unseasonably warm. Who sweats at night in early March when they live in zone 5?

The Daffodils are about done, the Hyacinths will fade shortly, the Forsythia is already losing its blossoms... and I'm still leery of a cold spell, it still only being March.

It can't be argued that the severity of storms has gotten a bit worse. It can't be argued that it's been a very strange turn of events for a semi-northern winter... and logic should tell anyone that humankind and the actions thereof are having an impact on our overall climate and weather patterns.


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RE: Weather Report

I don't know of anyone that thinks outside their own little world that would not expect climate patterns to change.


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RE: fire weather

The big issue coming here is fire weather. Record warm temperatures in the 70's and 80's, extremely low humidity (<15%), and high winds, >25 mph. This is not so much in the mountains but down in the lower elevations with the dead grasses and weeds left from the winter.


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Paraphrasing

I can't find the exact quote now, but Michael Mann said something about the weather is a roll of the dice, and global warming loaded the dice. Which is why we're seeing all those double sixes.


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RE: Weather Report

The rainfall has been so minimal here that the hillsides are already brown and the sweep of wild mustards and radishes are barely noticable. Normally by this time these weeds would have started their major color displays on fallow and disturbed ground.

Demi you persist in promoting the misconception the changing weather patterns are the same or are similar to changing climate patterns. Most of humanity has never lived through climate change, at least since the "little ice age". Those episodes of "volcanic winters" were abnormalities.


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RE: Weather Report

Well then some people need to get their biceps and abs in shape! Looks like more people will be showing them.


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RE: Weather Report

Dennis, every fruit tree in new england will lose their blossoms to frost this spring, I bet.


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Okay, yesterday I walked my dogs, and thought we'd all die from the heat. It was almost 90....88 in fact. Fast forward to the exact time 24 hours later. Walked the dogs in 51 degree temps with wind and rain. I'm happy for the rain but the dogs were going ...WHAT???


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RE: Weather Report

Each person might live in their own little micro-climate, but when you add up the reports of unusual weather patterns and climate changes given by everyone, it says something about the bigger picture.


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RE: Weather Report

  • Posted by ohiomom 3rdrockfromthesun (My Page) on
    Sun, Mar 25, 12 at 8:33

Some people cannot see the big picture cause they cannot get out of the box they have built around themselves.

My lettuce and spinach is coming up, also some annuals (sweet alyssum) that I planted in a window box last year.

What has been amazing (for March in NEOhio) is the amount of insects !!

Today it is cool and a little rain has fallen ... more Springlike but temps still above normal.

I do not know a single soul (outside of this forum) that denies "climate change", the only differences is "if" the human factor is involved.

To act like the climate is not changing seems a little out there to me, but hey what ever floats your boat.

Shrug


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RE: Weather Report

Ohiomom, I think the "human factor" is the crux. How else could they justify relentless continued burning of fossil fuels?

Took a nice magnolia walk yesterday evening. The blossoms are starting to drop, and it isn't even April. Squill, trout lilies, and blood root are blooming. My potatoes haven't come up yet, but some of my peas are 2" tall. It's much cooler today, in the 50's. It's a nice break from the freaky heat. Last I checked, 7000 high temperature records were broken, some of the lows exceeding the previous highs.

Anyone know what will happen in the Atlantic as the heat cell moves off the continent?


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RE: Weather Report

Well, the way I see it is... it's illogical to think we can populate, as we have, and do what we're doing and what we've done to this planet, without any noticeable consequences.

For every action, there's a reaction. Enough action and the reaction gets a little severe.

I guess some people simply like the koolaid, Ohiomom... but I'm not a drinker of it, myself, and I suspect you aren't, either. :-)


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RE: Weather Report

"How else could they justify relentless continued burning of fossil fuels?"

I don't think that is what is behind the denying. The relentlessness is a function of population size. Everyone in the US could cease driving today permanently and the freed-up petroleum would be absorbed by daily global usage within months. China and India would suck it up in stride. That's the reality and everybody kind of knows it. It's a classic prisoner's dilemma at the largest possible scale.

That is why even though we know global warming and pollution and resource degradation are serious issues now and will become much more severe, most of us are still using fossil fuel to some degree at every level every day, because the alternative is relative extreme poverty and huge diminishment of personal circumstances for one's children and etc. Who is going to willingly make that choice? The only rational personal strategy is to conserve fossil fuel as carefully as possible. There is nothing stopping hundreds or thousands of us from jumping out of the status quo and creating more sun-sufficient communal villages but we don't.


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RE: Weather Report

Wow all my daffs are finished I never even got up to The Bronx to take pics the daffodil fields.


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RE: Weather Report

At least with these last two weekend storms we have added about 3 to 4 inches to this year's total rainfall, still well below average amounts of between 15 and 18 inches. Another storm is predicted for next weekend.

I do not appreciate temps in the low 30F's this late in the season. Our high temp yesterday barely passed 50. I covered my tables of "summer crop" seedling with triple layers of row-cover fabric. These cold rains have driven soil temps back into the 50's and set back our schedule to begin planting early crops of "summer" veggies.


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Marshall, did you have any hail? It was very brief here, but I can imagine that the heavy downpour mixed with a little bit of hail could really damage seedlings.

Second weekend in a row I had to have candles ready; last weekend because of the winds, and last night because of the lightening.


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RE: Weather Report

  • Posted by ohiomom 3rdrockfromthesun (My Page) on
    Mon, Mar 26, 12 at 10:58

....so we went from 80's to a low expected in the 20's tonite with frost. Hope the fruit trees hold up.


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RE: Weather Report

Mention again that its the extremes to worry about, not the averages, and that the world food supply is now heavily dependent on crops that have a very limited range of temperature, moisture, daylight, and season length to succeed.

The weather here is up near record temps, and the mountain snow melt has started. Red flag fire warning for all of eastern Colorado, SE Wyoming, and NE New Mexico. Don't light a match - the fires go several thousand acres in a few hours.


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RE: Weather Report

Nancy, we received some slushy hail but nothing too damaging. I did rig a temporary translucent shelter over the tables, more to protect the seedlings for cold rains and raise the temp a bit than to protect against hail or heavy rain. I'm sitting here at 8:15 or so awaiting rising temp. to 45F before putting out trays of emerging seedlings. Well, I gambled on an early Spring and seems to have lost. If I have to toss my own trays of transplants, I likely will have to buy in replacements later at much greater expense than incurred from growing my own.


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I decided not to jump the gun, knowing how fickle weather has been lately. I'm glad I waited!


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OM..us too..the upper 80's to the 20s tonight. A lot of scrambling to cover plants and bring them inside tonight. I hope the orchards aren't going to suffer freeze. And winds are ferocious.


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RE: Weather Report

What the Hey! This report just in, summarizing research results published in the recent Nature Climate Change journal and reported in Reuter's news.

-------------------------------------------------------
Weather-Manmade Global Warming Link Builds, Study Says

* Extreme rainfall, heatwaves linked to global warming

* Relationship between storms and warming less clear

By Nina Chestney

LONDON, March 25 (Reuters) - Extreme weather events over the past decade have increased and were "very likely" caused by manmade global warming, a study in the journal Nature Climate Change said on Sunday.

Scientists at Germany's Potsdam Institute for Climate Research used physics, statistical analysis and computer simulations to link extreme rainfall and heat waves to global warming. The link between warming and storms was less clear.

"It is very likely that several of the unprecedented extremes of the past decade would not have occurred without anthropogenic global warming," said the study.

The past decade was probably the warmest globally for at least a millennium. Last year was the eleventh hottest on record, the World Meteorological Organisation said on Friday.

Extreme weather events were devastating in their impacts and affected nearly all regions of the globe.

They included severe floods and record hot summers in Europe; a record number of tropical storms and hurricanes in the Atlantic in 2005; the hottest Russian summer since 1500 in 2010 and the worst flooding in Pakistan's history.

Last year alone, the United States suffered 14 weather events which caused losses of over $1 billion each.
NOT NORMAL

The high amount of extremes is not normal, the study said.

Even between March 13 and 19 this year, historical heat records were exceeded in more than 1,000 places in North America.

For some types of extreme weather, there are physical reasons why they would increase in a warming climate. For example, if average temperature rises, then so will the number of heat records if all else remains equal, the study said.

Natural weather patterns like El Nino or La Nina can also cause highs in global temperature or increased precipitation which leads to floods.

"Single weather extremes are often related to regional processes, like a blocking high pressure system or natural phenomena like El Nino," said Stefan Rahmstorf, co-author of the study and chair of the institute's earth system analysis department.

"These are complex processes that we are investigating further. But now these processes unfold against the background of climatic warming. That can turn an extreme event into a record-breaking event."

Recent years have seen an exceptionally large number of record-breaking and destructive heatwaves in many parts of the world and research suggests that many or even most of these would not have happened without global warming.

Currently, nearly twice as many record hot days as record cold days are being observed both in the United States and Australia, the length of summer heatwaves in western Europe has almost doubled and the frequency of hot days has almost tripled over the period from 1880 to 2005.

Extremely hot summers are now observed in about 10 percent of the global land area, compared with only about 0.1-0.2 percent for the period 1951 to 1980, the study said.

The link between storms and hurricanes and global warming is less conclusive but at least some of recent rainfall extremes can be attributed to human influences on the climate, it added.


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RE: Weather Report

I'm going to be buying a lot of Maple Syrup when I go shopping tonight. It should keep pretty well. Keep my cupboard as full as I can this year.

(Closet Speculator at work.)

Hay


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RE: Weather Report

Be careful. Once you open a jug of syrup, it can develop mold.

/see a grown man cry


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RE: Weather Report

Buying high-elevation sugar bush would be a smart long-term investment.


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RE: Weather Report

Marshall, sorry to hear of the problems the weather is causing you.

The climate change conspiracy is rather large, isn't it? Not just in the U.S. and U.K. but with a beachhead - or riverhead, if you insist on geographic correctness - in Potsdam as well.


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RE: Weather Report

I always refrigerate my real maple syrup. I rarely use the sweetner now, so a small container can last me a couple of years. When I first moved into this home, my stash of quality Canadian maple syrup managed to disappear from the cupboard where I stored them a few weeks earlier. The other kinds of syrup remained, suggesting a thief of discriminating taste.

What is a high-elevation sugar bush, Pat?


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RE: Climate Report

Nancy, the noise machine of media would have us believe that scepticism based on science is widespread when in fact the opposite is true. The denialist control the message and their messengers are skilled and unscrupulous in pushing the denialists' talking points. All they have to do is maintain the aura that the science of climate change is still moot.


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RE: Weather Report

Marshall, I agree. My comment was meant to be tongue-in-cheek.

My impression is that the majority of denialists are web-based warriors trying their best to amplify the message of the Kochs and their ilk.


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RE: Weather Report

Nor, the echoes are web-based but the real "work" is "think tank"-based and funded by greening non-profit foundations.


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RE: Weather Report

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Tue, Mar 27, 12 at 0:45

That map looks like a bad sunburn, which is certainly appropriate.


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RE: Weather Report

Marshall, I mean sugar maples on land at the highest elevation in it's range, as that is where they will resist rising average temps the longest, highest elevation and furthest northward. Without moving to Canada if one is one the US, then the smartest course is to by at the highest elevation.

That is also why Conn river valley syrup from central MA is not as tasty as syrup from further west and north, those trees are already more impacted by climate. The difference is very marked to this high consumption syrup household.


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RE: Weather Report

True, I have been buying Canadian syrup for years, grade B.

I thought that was what you meant by sugarbush. Back when I worked the sap buckets to pick up a bit of spending money, we didn't bother with those less accessible stands. We did have our favorite copses where sap was better but in the end all saps were combined for the boil off.

In California we have a native shrub/small tree called Sugarbush (Rhus ovata) which Natives used the berries to make drinks similar to lemonade


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RE: Weather Report

As anticipated, the fires are starting. Wind is too strong to fly slurry planes.

"ASPEN PARK - Fire crews working on the 3,050-acre Lower North Fork Fire are bracing for another wind-swept day as they scramble for more ground and air support.

Winds of up to 45 mph are expected today in the fire area in the mountains west of Denver along the U.S. Highway 285 corridor and officials are concerned about a repeat of yesterday's fire behavior, when the blaze roared through 3,000 acres in a matter of hours.

"The winds will tell the story today," said Jacki Kelley, a Jefferson County Sheriff's Office spokeswoman.

The burn area today "is likely to go higher," Kelly said.

One person was found dead in the fire zone on Monday, the victim's name has not been released. Officials are awaiting an autopsy to give an official cause of death.

Between 15 to 25 structures have been lost to the fire, Kelley said, and 900 telephone notifications telling residents to evacuate their homes were made last night. " snip

This is an area of pine forest, narrow roads, and a whole lot of isolated homes on acreage.

Forest fires in March < take note.

Here is a link that might be useful: photo and story


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RE: Weather Report

  • Posted by vgkg 7-Va Tidewater (My Page) on
    Tue, Mar 27, 12 at 10:41

The low temp here last nite hit 36F and that looks like the low for the next week at least. I did break down and buy 2 tomato plants last week (my indoor seed just broke ground). I covered up these 2 plants and they look a-ok this morning so if things go right I may have a vine ripened brandywines and Cherokee purples by the first week in June rather than July. All fruit trees looks safe as well, hope you all north of me did ok?


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My plum and nectarine that had bloomed look ok, low temp was 30.


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RE: Weather Report

At my house, the plum tree (>40 yrs old) has already finished flowering and is pushing leaves even though we've had a couple of frosty night and two cold rain storms. I don't see any fruit set. Crossing fingers.

Nice to see snow capped ranges locally.


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RE: Weather Report

I saw the forest fires on TV tonight. No snow pack and very dry condition and under zero control. At least the winds stopped, they said. Here my plants are back outside and no frost or freeze in the long range. Nothing seems to be adversely affected by last night's temps.


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RE: Weather Report

  • Posted by ohiomom 3rdrockfromthesun (My Page) on
    Wed, Mar 28, 12 at 7:14

Yesterday morning there was a "freeze/frost" across the area ... interviewed one of the Patterson family about their orchards (peach/apple) and whether or not they would lose some or all of their crop. Mr P commented how the blooms were "weeks" early and it was a wait and see.

This morning I went to move the truck and it is in the 60's !!

Off to work in shirtsleeves ...


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RE: Weather Report

83 degree sun last week ... aaaaaand we woke up to two inches of snow in ME this morning. Gotta love it!


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RE: Weather Report

A bit more info on that forest fire SW of Denver - In Colorado March is, historically, the snowiest month, but this year was the driest on record. Seems it started from a controlled burn conducted a week earlier - and then comes along a wind storm with gusts up to 80 mph. According to the radio yesterday, the fire went from about an acre to 3,000 acres in an hour.

Whoosh.


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RE: Weather Report

We went boating/fishing on a local lake recently where we're usually ice fishing on a foot of ice on a typical year.

It was sunny, 80 degrees and the fish were biting like crazy. We had the whole lake to ourselves.


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No frost here. I picked fresh chives from the garden for dinner last night. Earlier this week I hear it might be 80 again Sunday.


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Grain growers in Minn. are facing a disaster, once expecting their Fall-seeded wheat to have remained snow-covered until spring.


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On the down side of this lovely warm weather is that we've got a nicce healthy crop of wood ticks and skeeters~~

Nothing is free...


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Where's Maxter?


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We're expecting massive parasites, tiny and large, internal and external... from livestock lice and internal flukes, to other animals of a destructive nature. Ticks, fleas, spiders, mosquitoes, beetles of all kinds.

I usually look forward to the predators in the gardens that help consume the bad bugs... not so much the larger creatures that eat my plants, are a danger or a bother.

We my have to hit every domestic animal a little harder with better anti-parasitic products. And though I welcome certain creatures, like snakes and most spiders and other predators, the poisonous ones have to go, as do the rodents.


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The forest fires SW of Denver is about half 'contained', and they are really working on it today.

This weekend, its record high heat, low humidity, and strong winds.

Its gonna be a long fire season this year.


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It sounds like it, David... how horrible for that part of our beautiful country. I've been to and through Colorado many times, and from what I recall, it was lovely... especially the Denver area. What I remember most were the gorgeous wildflowers along the highways in certain seasons, very different than the types we have. I always noticed things like that. But then, we were usually flying through one state to deliver or pick up in the next! I hope it gets better.


 o
the conditions

Millions of acres of beetle-killed trees, record high temperatures, single digit humidity, and winds gusting to 80 mph.


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RE: Weather Report

If the warm sunny weather continues, it will be very good for our summer tourism economy here in lake country.


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Bad weather for the bees this year since everything blossomed too soon throwing off their cycle.


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record high temperatures, single digit humidity, and winds gusting to 80 mph.

Here it's called 'Santa Ana conditions' for the Santa Ana winds.

Raymond Chandler from 1938:

There was a desert wind blowing that night. It was one of those hot dry Santa Anas that come down through the mountain passes and curl your hair and make your nerves jump and your skin itch. On nights like that every booze party ends in a fight. Meek little wives feel the edge of the carving knife and study their husbands' necks. Anything can happen...

'Anything' includes pyromaniacs getting their kicks.


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RE: Weather Report

And my beautiful Fuji Apple tree is loaded with blooms this year... I may have to hand pollinate?


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RE: Weather Report

Twenty years ago we installed a landscape designed to peak in flowering in late April. Here it is at the end of March and most of those plantings and their replacements are in flower. Most of our 80+ deciduous fruit trees have finished flower although some of the late flowering types have yet to break dormancy.


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RE: Weather Report

My apricot is in full bloom, the cherries are just about to go off. A mile down the road and 200 feet lower, all the fruit trees are in full bloom.

Around here, we will get fruit if they flower in late April-May. Not March.

Frost and snow on Sunday.


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RE: Weather Report

  • Posted by vgkg 7-Va Tidewater (My Page) on
    Sat, Mar 31, 12 at 17:15

Inch worms are in charge here, it's a plague and trying to keep them off the fruit trees organically is a real challenge. It's like having tent worms without the tent, shake a branch and the worms drop like a hundred seal teams deploying from choppers, wishing that all those long webs were spiders.


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RE: Weather Report

I just walked the dogs in a down coat with mittens on in 45 degree damp weather. Last week I was sweating in shorts and a tee in the 80's.


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RE: Weather Report

Okay, I broke my most cardinal rule: don't plant tomatoes and squash before April, closer to May than March. We put in early tomatoes and summer and winter squash yesterday, planting though plastic and covered afterwards with floating row covers. We used to be able to buy perforated plastic tunnels (1 mil) up until this year. Nary a one to be found at my usual suppliers.

I'm trying to beat out the cucumber/squash beetles who arrived last year in April in amazing numbers. On Monday I'm transplanting Diva cukes which set fruit without pollination and so can be kept covered for the duration. The transplanted squash will be kept covered until flowering.


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RE: Weather Report

  • Posted by natal Louisiana 8b (My Page) on
    Sat, Mar 31, 12 at 18:47

Have family in Conifer. The closest fire is a mile from their house, but the good news is it's now 70% contained.

Today in Baton Rouge we hit 87 ... 88 tomorrow. I'm so dreading summer!


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RE: Weather Report

Marshall, have you tried Wall O'Waters for your toms? We've been doing it the past several years--they're very cost effective, too.


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RE: Weather Report

Elvis, I've been using wall-o-waters off and on for decades. I limit their use to really finicky tomatoes and chili peppers that do better with more heat and humidity that w-o-w supply. I grow 50-100 tomato bushes and vines at a time and train to stake or trellis and let other have their viney heads and sprawl.


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RE: Weather Report

I'm impressed :0

Easy to see why you don't use WOWs. What do you do with all those toms?

I'm doing 6 this year...got enough canned for next winter already.


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RE: Weather Report

Elvis, the perforated tunnels cost about $10 per 60 feet, versus approximately $10 for 3 wall-o-waters. Not very price competitive.


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RE: Weather Report

I am an organic market farmers, part-time nowadays.


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RE: Weather Report

Tomorrow our community garden opens. We're planting spring onions, peas, spinach and also got Bibb lettuce plants tonight at Home Depot to put in. They were selling tomato plants April 1st?? Unheard of.


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RE: Weather Report

In May 2008, I was walking through limber pines at 10,000 feet in Boulder County, when a mountain pine beetle landed on my sleeve. At high elevation, May is a gray area between winter and spring, but when even more beetles landed it suggested that, at least for them, summer had already arrived.

Mountain pine beetles kill trees to reproduce, attacking in mass to overcome a pine's defenses. Colorado reports say that pine beetles historically take flight in July and August and are rare above 9,000 feet. The cycle of adults killing trees, laying eggs and the eggs maturing to kill more trees historically took one or more years for most beetle populations.

Seeing pine beetles nearly two months early led my academic adviser, Jeffry Mitton, of the department of ecology and evolutionary biology at the University of Colorado Boulder, to suggest we monitor the situation. We were surprised to learn that beetles could not only lay eggs in May or June, but that these eggs were also developing into adults that emerge and fly in August. The laying and hatching of two generations of mountain pine beetles in one year is unprecedented and would lead not to a doubling of beetle numbers, but to an exponential increase.

While Jeff and I are the first to report two annual generations, early mountain pine beetle flight has become common, and more generations each year is one likely reason why the current beetle epidemic is so severe. Outbreaks are occurring across the beetle's range, stretching from northern Mexico to Canada's Yukon Territory, and from Pacific coast states to South Dakota. All told, beetles have killed many millions of acres of trees, and while the epidemic must certainly wane in areas where few living pines remain, vast forests remain at risk.

As Jeff and I reported, we see two generations of mountain pine beetles per year in several forests of the Front Range - a development that follows decades of warming temperatures recorded at the University of Colorado's Mountain Research Station. Warming temperatures have not only led to early flights, but also to pine beetle range expansion into forests above 11,000 feet in the Rocky Mountains where cold temperatures historically excluded them. Beetles have also moved hundreds of miles northward in Canada.

While we were surprised by the switch to two generations per year by mountain pine beetles, we shouldn't have been. Growth and development of pine beetles are directly controlled by temperature. At the same time, scientists have documented changes for thousands of plants and animals in response to warming temperatures. Among these examples are hundreds of insects, several of them close evolutionary relatives of the mountain pine beetle. What this story tells us is that while climate change is the subject of political debate, nature is in agreement over a warmer world and is offering us clear evidence that things are changing in response.

What can we do about bark beetles? The short answer is not optimistic. Insects reproduce rapidly, and as the name implies, the mountain pine beetle lives in rugged terrain and this makes control of epidemics difficult if not impossible. Insecticides have unintended environmental consequences and are typically ineffective against an insect that spends nearly 95 percent of its life hidden under tree bark. Scientific studies of tree thinning to prevent infestations yield conflicting results; and such a large outbreak area cannot be effectively managed.

The longer answer is the current pine beetle epidemic and future insect outbreaks will have profound ecological and economic consequences. Nevertheless, pine forests will remain on the landscape, even if they differ from what we have come to expect. We might not be able to control insect epidemics, but we can address climate change and also encourage management toward more diverse forests.

Jeff and I learned that pine beetles are producing two generation per year by using novel, intensive methods. There are more common and easier ways to monitor bark beetles, but these methods would have failed to capture the change. I think this lesson applies beyond our work. Addressing climate change will require us to use novel methods on many levels. Science and forestry are great places to start.

Here is a link that might be useful: link


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RE: Weather Report

David, can the suseptive (to pine bark beetles) species be converted? Is that practical or even possible in the mountainous terrain? What about Aspen?


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RE: Weather Report

Not good, David, not good... the climactic changes we're seeing everywhere are bringing new problems to deal with.

Sort of related... I never see adult spiders this early hiding in the kennel corners... I've already had to eradicate several. I can't have the dogs getting bit.

It's very early for the moles to be so hard at work, snakes sunning themselves... today feels like summer out there.

The good news is, I did see bees working at the apple tree blossoms, so we'll hopefully have a crop this fall.

Is there any option available that could chemically sterilize a generation or two of those pine beetles? I always hate resorting to chemicals, but sometimes... you have to do what you have to do.


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RE: Weather Report

Elvis, not practically - just the sheer size of the problem; "Bark beetles, engraver beetles and gypsy moths are the primary culprits behind a threefold increase in forestland mortality caused by insect attacks between 2003 and 2007, according to a U.S. Forest Service report obtained Wednesday by The Associated Press.

The volume of forests in the lower 48 states killed by bugs totaled 37 million acres during the period, up from 12 million during the previous five years. Millions of additional acres have perished since"

And a lot of that is on pretty steep terrain - worrying about both fire danger and protecting the watershed.

As for Aspen, its part of the post-fire cycle, the pine/spruce being the climax species. But Aspen is under stress as well, a condition called Sudden Aspen Decline (SAD) killed huge stands of Aspen - that seems to be again a function of the longer dry season, heat, and drought. The way this year is shaping up, with record highs already drying out the forest a full two months early, it could be another bad year for them as well.

Nobody knows what will happen - this is a massive, very rapid shift in forest ecology happening over the entire rocky mountain region, Mexico to Canada, and as we were discussing in the other thread about people who want to privatize the national forests, the old way of thinking is just that - obsolete in the age of rapid climate change.

And now for something different .....

For residents in Missouri and eastern Kansas, a change is about to occur in the way some tornado and severe storm warnings are issued.

And if phrases like "catastrophic," "complete destruction" or "unsurvivable if shelter not sought below ground" get your attention, well, that's the point.

Starting Monday, the National Weather Service is kicking off an experiment that it hopes will more accurately describe the most severe storms and help people in their path understand the risks they face.

Dubbed "Impact Based Warning," the new system is designed to communicate more information to the media and emergency management. It will be tested at National Weather Service offices serving Topeka, Wichita, Kansas City, St. Louis and Springfield.

"When there is a known, very large and significant tornado heading for a populated area, we can better convey that threat and elevate the warning over a more typical warning," said Dan Hawblitzel, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Pleasant Hill.

Last year saw a historic number of tornado fatalities across the United States, including the EF-5 twister on May 22 that killed 161 people in Joplin. But even after sirens sounded in Joplin, some people waited to take shelter until the deadly tornado began chewing a path through the city.

The weather service, the media and emergency managers are participating in the effort.

"I wouldn't say it's a scare tactic, but people need to know when to take a warning seriously - which is always - but there are some storms that are different magnitudes and there are different ways that you should take precautions," Hawblitzel said.

The weather service enlisted social scientists to help with the wording. The new warnings will be similar to current ones but contain several additions.

First is a line that will identify the specific hazard, such as large hail, strong wind or a tornado.

A second line will say whether the tornado has been indicated by radar or observed by spotters or law enforcement.

A third line will describe the potential outcome, such as uprooted trees, extensive damage to buildings or loss of life.

The warnings also may contain taglines, such as "significant" or "catastrophic."

"Significant" indicates a strong tornado that could cause major property damage.

"Catastrophic," which would describe the Joplin tornado, is a tagline that weather officials don't expect to use often.

It will require confirmation, such as video or numerous damage reports.

The enhanced warnings also might be issued on severe thunderstorms that threaten property and safety, Hawblitzel said.

An example would be a storm with winds over 80 miles per hour or hail that is baseball-size or larger.

Under the current system, severe thunderstorm warnings are issued when wind speeds are at least 58 miles an hour or hail is at least one inch in diameter.

Those warnings won't stop.

"We don't want this to take away from a typical tornado warning," Hawblitzel said. "The typical tornado warning will still constitute the vast number of tornado warnings that are issued."

Joplin resident Jeff Lehr said he might have sought shelter had an enhanced warning come across his television on May 22.

Instead, it wasn't until a siren distracted him from a sporting event that he looked out a window and saw dark thunderstorm clouds.

Even then, he didn't take cover until his apartment windows began imploding.

"After hundreds of times of similar thunderstorms approaching Joplin, many of those with tornado warnings attached, and you see them pass - you kind of get jaundiced about the warnings and tend not to give them the weight you probably should," said Lehr, a reporter at The Joplin Globe.

Here is a link that might be useful: link


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RE: Weather Report

It was 76 today, a welcome change from the cool, damp 50's of last week. My potatoes are finally up. I haven't started tomato seeds yet. I've thought about direct sowing them, but I don't think I'll take the chance. I haven't been to any garden centers to see if any here are selling plants.

What a good idea to add further description to the tornado warnings. Maybe they should use different siren sounds to designate the level of danger.I totally understand not going to a basement just because there is a tornado warning after hearing so many over time that didn't cause any serious damage.


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RE: Weather Report

Heard yesterday that the number of tornados this year is already double the average, due to all the record temperatures so early in the year.

Currently going on in North Texas.

Here is a link that might be useful: link


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RE: Weather Report

Well, it's near 80 here at my house so I just planted two kinds each of tomatoes, sweet pepper and summer squash and a half dozen Armenian cucumbers. Maybe later I'll plant pole bean seeds, Dave52's King's Banquet. Loves the heat of summer so should do well up here.


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RE: Weather Report

  • Posted by vgkg 7-Va Tidewater (My Page) on
    Tue, Apr 3, 12 at 17:27

Inch worms still on a rampage here, never seen them this bad and it's several species. 2 apple trees are either dead or scared to come out of dormancy, could just be stripped to the bone too, hard to tell. I hesitate to guess at what other bug populations are in the works this season. Got 1 tomato plant ready to bloom, that's nutz here on 4/3. At least the pollen is almost over, it usually gets going strong by mid-April.


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RE: Weather Report

  • Posted by ohiomom 3rdrockfromthesun (My Page) on
    Tue, Apr 3, 12 at 18:20

Vgkg was visiting my daughter in Newport News a couple of years ago and her pecan tree was covered in "webs", is that what was on the tree inchworms ?


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RE: Weather Report

I remember those webworms, whole sacks of them covering trees of my youth. We used to spray them with kerosene and light them up. Sprays couldn't get through the dense webbing. As I recall, these pests had recently arrived in the area and were mostly found on certain kinds of wild Prunus and other creek-loving species.


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RE: Weather Report

  • Posted by vgkg 7-Va Tidewater (My Page) on
    Wed, Apr 4, 12 at 9:35

OM & Marshall, no these aren't the tent worms that come to mind though they are about also, these are just generic inch worms, green and brown similar to cabbage loopers but are everywhere in locust like numbers. They're munching on trees that usually don't get munched upon too. My SIL complains about them eating her budding hydranga too. I can't come into the house without a few clinging onto me.


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RE: Weather Report

Does this outbreak represent the final sign that such larvae are resistant to Bacillus turingensis whose toxic essence has been widely engineered into corn, cotton, soybeans and other crops? Organic farmers have relied on sprays of B.t. to control these juvenile stages of moths.


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RE: Weather Report

Vgkg, you could maybe try using some of that Bt as cologne.....


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RE: Weather Report

  • Posted by vgkg 7-Va Tidewater (My Page) on
    Wed, Apr 4, 12 at 23:27

Maybe this inch worm outbreak is just a fluke and localized to central Va? Can only guess but it is in the news here. I would say that our warm winter kept over wintering critters a bit more alive than usual. I saw a Rove Beetle today, only the 2nd one I've ever seen, glad he's one of the meat eaters out there. Not sure what to expect when the cuke beetles, squash bugs, bean beetles, stink bugs, etc. show up....a weird growing season thus far...


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RE: Weather Report

Saw bees and other insects pollinating the apple blossoms, so there should be a nice crop come fall.

I'm seeing aphids already... way too early. I hate to use chemicals, but I'm resorting to a systemic granule treatment this year. If I don't my rose crop will be a failure.

I've been noticing some things are growing by warmth and weather, while others are sticking to their timed inner clock. It's all very interesting.


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RE: Weather Report

That's why I put in my cucurbitae in before easter instead of a few weeks before the end of May -- trying to beat the beatles. Of course we had Sundowner Winds the last3-4 nights and most of the plastic laid to warm up the soil was ripped away and most never recovered.


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RE: Weather Report

I got my greenhouse fans set up yesterday, running the plugs through their weather proof covers, making sure everything was working. Soon, that will begin to fill up with plant materials.

Even with this unseasonably warmer weather, I'm still a month ahead of the game, I think.


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RE: Weather Report

16 degrees Fahrenheit (that would be -8.88 degrees C-ommunist/socialist) .

Suck on that, over-anxious, climate change influenced fruit blossoms.


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RE: Weather Report

Marshall, tack that plastic down: cut the U-shaped ends off wire coat hangers to make inexpensive "garden staples." The soil in my entire veg garden is covered with black plastic from the time I furrow up the raised rows and hills till end of season. The benefits are good: warm soil, no weeds, fried slugs. The downside is no bare feet (slicker than snot when wet, also very hot to the touch), also looks peculiar till the plants start filling out. Just a suggestion.


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RE: Weather Report

Well, Elvis, thanks for the suggestions. I buy 4'X 2400' rolls of olive brown infra-red-transmitting plastic, 1 mil thick. I buy boxes of soil staples, a thousand to the box. Lot quicker than cutting plastic and coat hangers when you need to cover a half mile of beds.


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RE: Weather Report

I guess!

You're welcome :)


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  • Posting is a two-step process. Once you have composed your message, you will be taken to the preview page. You will then have a chance to review your post, make changes and upload photos.
  • After posting your message, you may need to refresh the forum page in order to see it.
  • Before posting copyrighted material, please read about Copyright and Fair Use.
  • We have a strict no-advertising policy!
  • If you would like to practice posting or uploading photos, please visit our Test forum.
  • If you need assistance, please Contact Us and we will be happy to help.


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