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Are you a Purell person?

Posted by tobr24u z6 RI (My Page) on
Mon, Apr 14, 14 at 5:03

It is said that we have become so germ conscious that by constantly sanitizing ourselves and our environment we opening the door to super bugs. This could be true but I find myself using a hand sanitizer whenever eating out and wash with soap before preparing any food at home. Also, I clean with a partial bleach solution from a spray bottle in the kitchen and bathroom. I want to live germ free, but that is just me, and you?


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Are you a Purell person?

I never use hand sanitizers of any kind, any place, any time. I do wash my hands in the bathroom and while preparing food, but that’s it. It’s not possible to live germ free--and many of those bacteria are essential to us. So I don’t worry about it.
But I do worry about paving the way for super bugs.


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RE: Are you a Purell person?

I might have got this from my aunt who even sprayed the family phone with some kind of aerosol spray. She also turned over mattresses and dragged them out to beat them every spring. However she was a very modern woman for her time and even flew from Boston to NYC in an open cockpit plane back in the 30's, played golf and drove me around in a big Buick when I visited her as a child...


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RE: Are you a Purell person?

  • Posted by rosie Southeast 7A/B (My Page) on
    Mon, Apr 14, 14 at 7:32

Sounds like a neat person, Tobr. I'm more like Pidge, though, and virtually never use any sanitizer beyond soap and water to wipe down surfaces.

With the exception of being out in public--especially, of course, visiting public bathrooms, and I usually wash hands first thing on arriving home. This last week with 2 small grandchildren was a series of admonitions not to touch door handles and to keep scrubbing those soapy hands all over til Ahma says you can stop. :)


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I'm with Pidge... there is such a thing as too clean. We need to be exposed to certain things so we build immunity... antibodies.


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RE: Are you a Purell person?

  • Posted by vgkg 7-Va Tidewater (My Page) on
    Mon, Apr 14, 14 at 8:50

Normally I'm not a germ freak, but since getting chicks, handling them, cleaning up their poop, etc. I do use anti-biotic soap to clean up.


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RE: Are you a Purell person?

I'm a white vinegar person! I don't/wont use hand sanitizers


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I handle raw chicken parts before cooking them and clean everything VERY thoroughly as advised. Joe, I prefer my vinegar on fries...


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RE: Are you a Purell person?

Well... I, too, am exposed to a lot of animal waste... between the dogs, the livestock, etc... we use a disinfectant in the kennel, lime for the livestock areas, and I always wash with soap before handling anything post kennel cleaning.

But we avoid antibacterial soaps for general use, and are not the type to go overboard about sanitary conditions, like constantly using gel on hands, or anything like that.


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RE: Are you a Purell person?

Only in emergencies--after going to Walmart and after handling the gasoline nozzle when pumping gasoline.

My grandmother used Dr. Tichener's for those occasions when strangers would knock on the door and ask to use the telephone (can't do that anymore) and she would let them in to use the big heavy black phone. She was afraid of germs.

After contracting the flu several years ago, bronchitis and almost pneumonia and sick for several months, I'm much more careful and never use my bare hands to open doors.

I do see liquid hand sanitizers in many businesses, including physicians' officies.

I guess some would rather go by global warming than super bugs.

This post was edited by demifloyd on Mon, Apr 14, 14 at 9:56


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RE: Are you a Purell person?

What's Purell?


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RE: Are you a Purell person?

Antibacterial gel for your hands, Nancy... so you can sanitize on the go.


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RE: Are you a Purell person?

  • Posted by ohiomom 3rdrockfromthesun (My Page) on
    Mon, Apr 14, 14 at 9:51

I am glad someone asked "what's purell" cause I did not know either .... :)

White vinegar and water for cleaning and regular soap to wash hands, anyone who handles raw meat should wash their hands (cross contamination) but I am not a germaphobia type person. Maybe that is why I do not get colds, flu etc ??

For those who still have carpeting, use white vinegar and water solution instead of those soaps for "steam cleaners" .... my carpets used to look like new. I now have wood floors and it also works on those. No this is not a paid advertisement for white vinegar LOL


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RE: Are you a Purell person?

I use hand sanitizer when I walk into the gym, and carry around those sterilizing paper towels and use them before and after on all the machines, and use hand sanitizer when I leave. I use hand sanitizer when I walk into the hospital or any doctors' office and when I leave. I use those wipes on grocery carts.

Then I come home and play in the dirt.


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RE: Are you a Purell person?

Purell is a hand sanitizer, not an anti-bacterial soap.

My understanding is that there is a difference. The active ingredient in an anti-bacterial soap is triclosan which is under review by both the FDA and the Canadian government over safety concerns regarding absorption rates into the skin.

The active ingredient in a hand sanitizer is alcohol, usually ethyl alcohol.

Soap and water are just fine.


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RE: Are you a Purell person?

After washing my hands throughly in a public bathroom, I use a paper towel to open the exit door. Who knows what is on that door handle, but there would not be nice surprises revealed, were it tested.
I use then to wipe down grocery cart handles and anyplace im liable to touch on thr cart, they are nasty things, containing bacteria which has no reason being on the cart.
Im extremely uncomfortable even in the nicest of hotel rooms. I should have never watched that television expose with the black light tool. Bed bugs in hotel rooms brought my uncomfortable "hotel" state to a whole new level, freaked out DH too. Even $1,500 a night suites had exactly the same problems with the same severity as average range but decent hotel chains. That was shocking to me.

But in my own home Im pretty relaxed. I keep a clean place, am very mindful of cross contamination in the kitchen when handling food and vegetables and we are handwashers.

I do keep a small bottle of off brand type of purel in my handbag and a very large pump bottle in our master bath for refills. Its also good to use after washing a wound to apply some, allow it to air dry and then use a gel antibiotic, I often do this after a struggle with a thorny rose bush as i have developed an allergy type of reaction to thorn bush wounds.
For bath used by visitors, I keep a little cut glass bottle labeled as purel for guests who like to have it available after using a bathroom which doesnt belong to them.
You would be surprised at the appreciable remarks I get from both sexes for making it available.

Edited for clarity

This post was edited by mylab123 on Mon, Apr 14, 14 at 13:54


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RE: Are you a Purell person?

No, but when I worked at the prison I got exposed to the smell from my fellow officers using it a lot. True, we all touched common surfaces with the inmates, and they carried baggage with them: HIV, Hepatitis A,B,C, etc. We got tested for Tuberculosis every six months.
Normal sanitary practices always seemed enough to me, but then again I graze in the garden without washing what I consume. When I retired they had to pay me for unused sick time and it amounted to a tidy sum.


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RE: Are you a Purell person?

No, never.

I use soap and water. I never buy anti-bacterial anything.

The only exception is during the many weekends spent at baseball fields, some of these fields have no bathrooms, and no place in a few minutes driving distance with bathrooms, one must use a port-a-potty. Believe me this is done only as an absolute last resort. I keep some all natural hand sanitizer in the baseball bag for such occasions (I have no idea what's in it; I bought it years ago and as it's only used very infrequently, it's still almost full).

I am a mild germaphobe, but still do not use anti-bacterial cleaners.


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RE: Are you a Purell person?

I'm not a germaphobe and don't use antibacterials; don't carry Purell or similar products.

I will use the wipes to swab down shopping carts and will wash my hands with good old soap and water on coming home from the grocery stores, etc. And after a trip to the doctor's office as I had this AM. I used the skywalk system (used by all manner of folk) to get there from the parking ramp and there are elevator buttons and myriad doors. You do feel a good hand washing is in order.


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Nah.....we're mostly filthoids in the UK.....bath every Friday (whether we need it or not). .Europe's even filthier.


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RE: Are you a Purell person?

Nah.....we're mostly filthoids in the UK.....bath every Friday (whether we need it or not). .Europe's even filthier.


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We're obsessed with cleanliness here.

A short history of "ablutions"

Here is a link that might be useful: We all stink. No one smells.


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If we are having a particularly bad flu season I will use the sanitizer when I am in town since I am asthmatic and it is prudent but on a normal basis I don't. I would never try to get all the germs out of my life since if you remove safe germs you are making a space for something more virulent never mind just killing off the weak ones to leave only the super germs. I too am a vinegar user. Most bacteria have a very narrow ph window and if you change it up or down they die and you can drink vinegar it is so safe so acidify it is as opposed to making things basic.


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Ordinary soap and water for hands; Clorox Clean-up for kitchen & bath. Hand sanitizers on cruise ships.

It seems to me that "anti-bacterials" might provoke immunity eventually in some of these bugs.


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RE: Are you a Purell person?

In the winter I always wear gloves when out, which handles opening doors, cart handles, etc. I also wear gloves or use a tissue to hold the stylus when signing for charge payments, especially in drugstores. In the summertime, I carry a plastic bag in my pocket and use that the same way, throwing it out at the end of the trip.

In restaurants and doctors' offices, I make certain that I only allow the outer portion of my coat to touch hangers or chairs. I carry a plaastic bag to place my wallet and keys in in the doctor's office; I do not allow them to touch environmental surfaces in there. I only use a purse on long car trips, to carry medicine and other small necessary items. Purses are germ magnets that people frequently place on floors, etc; instead, I carry my wallet and keys in my pockets.

I keep a pump alcohol hand sanitizer inside my car and use it before touching my steering wheel. At home, but only because both DH and I have seen hospital action over the last several years, I use an antibiotic soap for handwashing. I also keep alcohol pump sanitizers in most rooms of the house, mainly to use after petting my cats (they unfortunately insist on being petted), mostly because of allergies.

I keep boxes of disposable plastic gloves to use handling raw meats, especially for making meatloaf. I never touch raw meat, but often I am able to remove it from its packaging and place it in its cookpot with a fork, without touching it. I clean any utensils that have touched raw meet separately before placing them in the dishwasher. I always wash my hands after handling raw eggs.

I also use the disposable gloves when changing the cat litter or doing other disagreeable cleaning tasks. I hold my breath when cleaning dusty items.

I use the other precautions Demi and MyLab mentioned, too.


From Duluth's link, I especially liked this quote:

"So then did Buddhists and Muslims think Christians were filthy?

'Absolutely. And they were right, too.' "


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Eibren, I also keep a box of disposable gloves in the kitchen for use when Im preparing meat or to use when Im using harsher chemicals such as a product containing bleach when cleaning up from meal preparations.
If Im sick or still getting over something, to try to prevent passing it on to DH I will wear them during an entire meal preparation, changing them when needed to prevent cross contamination of food - its so easy.

I believe you easily beat me in prevention measures taken regarding concerns about germs. However, I made a concerted effort to try to become less stringent about it all during the last few years. There was a time not so long ago when I could have given you a run for the title!
;)


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To say I am flabberghasted really doesn't cover it. Eibren, your (ahem) 'precautions' sound seriously on the OCD scale - we laugh about US cleanliness obsessions over here but nothing really quite convinced me how truly insane you all were. Door handles and shopping carts!!!
The American word for soil should have convinced me that something is a bit amiss - 'dirt'!!!
There has been a bit of an attempt to foist these anti-bacterials and sanitisers off on the European market.....but because we actually wish to maintain our immune systems and have healthy kids, many of us are resisting since there has been a corresponding rise (rather than the promised decrease) in gastric illness, various superbugs, bacterial invasions and the new 21st century evil - many, many more allergies......as the many germs which have inhabited our eco-system since forever have simply ramped up their response to imminent death by becoming even more invasive, turbo-charged and deadly.....whilst we are in danger of losing our own hard won long term immunity.
The only possible good thing I can think to say about these alcohol based sanitisers is the savings made by not using gallons of water to wash away some imaginary dirt.....and obviously, we all make an effort when visiting hospitals, to avoid bringing in extra germs since they are already a festering sump of illness.

Is American meat compromised in some way? I have never heard of using disposable gloves when cooking. This is a gardening website too - how can some of you bear to be playing in the soil?


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You should see me in my bio-hazard suit while doing the spring cleaning...


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Just plain old soap and water for me. I do use the sanitizer wipes in the grocery store to wipe the cart handle. I also use a wipe or paper towel to wipe the flusher in washrooms that require a manual flush.

I'm a bit compulsive about washing my hands several times while preparing food and use disposable gloves when mixing meat or dealing with a chicken.


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RE: Are you a Purell person?

What do you do the rest of the year that you need a bio-hazard suit? ;-)

I'm with you, Campanula... my Dad used to say, "a little dirt never hurt anyone", and it surely hasn't.

We treat the Ithaca the same way we treat the grill... it works fine in the condition it's in. I haven't been really sick in ages. In pain, yes... sick, no. :-)


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I also wear my suit when small children are around because they are so germy, and also for intimate adventures...


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intimate over a webcam, would that be?


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I just recently relocated a copy of Lawrence Wright's book "Clean and Decent". It is the most fun read you can imagine-not only a history of Bathrooms but a history of ideas about cleanliness. In Duluth's link above she mentions Romans using oil and scraping it off-the scrapings were sold! I cant remember what for. The Victorians had a fad of air bathing. You stripped down and exercised in front of a window or in some cases people even built screened rooms. It was suppose to clean you naturally.

We get told by our medical community that you shouldn't wash things like chickens and turkeys before you cook them because you can be spreading disease around your kitchen and cooking will kill any bacteria but they must not realize the rinsing water in processing plants can be full of feces...even cooked I draw the line there. I do wash out the sink afterward. Soap is great stuff. It doesn't actually kill anything, it just hauls it away. A spritz with vinegar and bobs your uncle.


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There was a huge expose in the 90's about the typical way dead chicken gets from the processing plant to your table.

The 'feces soup' part, so revolting to all americans, it hit one family member so hard that she has not since eaten chicken in any form since, which must be remembered when she is invited to another family's home for a meal. It's ok with me - she just can't and that's that - there are lots of other options to make those nights instead, back when we lived fairly close in distance from each other and saw each other several times a week.
Because boneless skinless chicken breasts are the primary meat used in my cooking, I just dont have the option. I pull on disposable gloves, put the huge package of Costco brand chicken ( never any hormones, cage free, organic) directly into the sink as soon as I get it home, wash, wash, wash, then divide up the pieces according to the various uses I have planned for it then put into freezer baggies and out into the deep freezer to use as I need them.
Then I scrub my white porcelain sink with barkeepers friend with paper towels ( the only time they are used) and lightly spray the whole sink and surrounding area with a homemade bleach solution. It really is required Camp - I know it strikes you as excessive but unless you know the source of the chicken prep for packaging and are approving of it from start to finish, it really is the best way I know of to be able to have "clean" chicken meat. I wanted to stop eating it too, after seeing what is done, but at that time chicken was incredibly inexpensive and I could create with a single chicken breast two complete meals for our family of, by then, three - so chicken remained on the shopping list.
Now we have a great deal of it because it is even lower fat than turkey - and we really like it, so it stays. But I do clean it very well and clean everything it might touch or splash on before cooking.

I don disposable gloves and rinse well all meat that is possible to wash before re-packaging it in the portions I want before putting it in the freezer.


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Anyone else see the report about how germy women's purses are?

I use soap and water. No hand sanitizers, using them only leaves a bunch of dead bacteria all over your hands. Soap and water washes bacteria away.


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Not a germa-phobe...

We let the dogs lick our plates when we're done eating... I share food with my dog using my fork or spoon...

I think the quality of the food one handles speaks volumes. I would never buy or eat commercially raised chicken, so that's not an issue. We handle game and other items with average care... nothing too special... just common sense.

Never had an issue.


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If you have raised and processed your own chicken it is not the most sanitary process at the best of times. Chickens are grubby creatures who take dust baths and you have to pull off the feathers-a smelly messy job- and empty out the innards before proceeding to washing and wacking up. Even if you skinned them you would still have germs all over the place.
It is just that when you have nice sinks that can be cleaned getting rid of the germs is not as hard as we think. Soap really is wonderful stuff. Even when it is part of a detergent it is very effective at grabbing and holding on to germs so they can be rinsed away. Soap doesn't kill germs-factoid for the day.
I have an enormous porcelain sink that has a high porcelain back with the faucet on the back of it-very easy to clean(no nasty germ trap behind my sink faucets) I also get those big packages from Costco and wash and bag them up. I have a cutting board that I sanitize with salt and vinegar after I use it and it is the only one I use for meat. the only reason I am so fussy with the cutting board is I also use it for beef and I like rare beef.


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Well, it IS helpful to have outbuildings with utility sinks strictly for the cleaning and processing of game... but even so, there are good sanitizers on the market that don't harm the environment.

In the field, we dress out game sometimes, and cook it right there.. over an open fire.

Out in this area, one can take their own poultry to the smaller processors who will do all the dirty work for you... at a small price per bird. Plucking is the worst.


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RE: Are you a Purell person?

Purell is ethanol which is fine kills 99% of everything unless your buying generic versions it can be pricey.
At work we used to use a dual spray of 3% peroxide & diluted white vinegar spray one then the other kills a lot without creating super bugs which some of the antibacterials do seem to help create made with tricloban or triclosan.

Here is a link that might be useful: Not without controversy


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RE: Are you a Purell person?

•Posted by patriciae Z7PNW (My Page) on Tue, Apr 15, 14 at 16:34

"If you have raised and processed your own chicken it is not the most sanitary process at the best of times. Chickens are grubby creatures who take dust baths and you have to pull off the feathers-a smelly messy job- and empty out the innards before proceeding to washing and wacking up. Even if you skinned them you would still have germs all over the place."

Yes, I have, and you are right. It's messy and it's a lot of work. The chickens are as clean in their habits as you allow them to be, we raised them on a small scale for our own use, and some in the family still do (nearby). The meat is soooo much better (and of course the eggs are wonderful!) than store bought.

I'm glad to hear that you are buying chicken pieces you can actually identify, Patricia, rather than the stuff they are processing over in China for us and then shipping back over here (with no country of origin on the label). Now that's scary stuff.

"Thanks to our Change.org petition (307,000-plus signatures and rising), millions of Americans have learned that the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is about to allow U.S chickens to be sent to China for processing and then shipped back to the U.S. for human consumption.

This arrangement is particularly alarming given China’s appalling food safety record and the fact that there will be no on-site USDA inspectors in those plants. In addition, American consumers will never know that chicken processed in China is in foods like chicken soup or chicken nuggets because there’s no requirement to label it as such.

One frequent refrain we’ve heard is that no U.S. company will ever ship chicken to China for processing because it doesn’t make economic sense. This was precisely the claim made by Tom Super, spokesman for the National Chicken Council, in a recent Houston Chronicle article about our petition:

“Economically, it doesn’t make much sense,” Super said. “Think about it: A Chinese company would have to purchase frozen chicken in the United States, pay to ship it 7,000 miles, unload it, transport it to a processing plant, unpack it, cut it up, process/cook it, freeze it, repack it, transport it back to a port, then ship it another 7,000 miles. I don’t know how anyone could make a profit doing that.”

Well, guess what? It clearly does make economic sense because this process is already being used for U.S. seafood..."

Here is a link that might be useful: Unsanitary Chicken


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And pork, so I understand.


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October, I heard that, too. Some sort of trade deal.

This from the USDA website is not comforting, at least not to me:

"Will chicken processed in China be included in school lunches?

The USDA’s Agricultural Marketing Service purchases approximately 20 percent of food for the National School Lunch Program on behalf of schools. The product purchased by AMS must be of 100 percent domestic origin, meaning that they are produced and processed from products which were produced, raised, and processed only in the United States.

Schools also make independent purchases on the commercial market to meet the needs of their students. These purchases are governed by section 12(n) of the Richard B. Russell National School Lunch Act (42 U.S.C. 1760), which requires participating schools to purchase domestically grown and processed foods, to the maximum extent practicable.

A domestic commodity/product is defined as “an agricultural commodity that is produced in the United States and a food product that is processed in the United States substantially using agricultural commodities that are produced in the United States.” Schools can consider a product domestic if it is processed in the United States and comprised of at least 51 percent domestic ingredients Schools have the option of using only products that are 100 percent domestically grown and processed."

Here is a link that might be useful: Mmmm Mmmm, Good!


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mmmmm, we are still in the throes of adulterated meat here in the UK - last year, it was horse....and this year, the meats have been 'cooked' to such a state that it is literally unidentifiable.....although, to be fair, this is mainly the numerous take-out services for curry, kebab and so forth (although I would rather eat some nice crunchy cat-litter (used, obvs) rather than curried seagull or deep-fried ratburgers (although I seriously pondered the concept after watching the sleekit, enormous country rats loitering in my woodpile (and breaking into the horsebox and going on a Nutella and biscuit binge).


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"...enormous country rats loitering in my woodpile (and breaking into the horsebox and going on a Nutella and biscuit binge)."

We have those jumbo rats here too, Campanula. Growing up in Chicago, the rats in the neighborhood walked around at night in the backyard, and I swear they were as big as cats. Garbage cans, you know.


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Other cultures eat meats that the Western world would assuredly balk at, but I would rather eat meat that wasn't adulterated with the processes and additives in use today, which would make some animals look a lot more appetizing, even though our culture might think it strange.

One doesn't know what one might eat if one were hungry enough... for example, crow is a delicious meat. Groundhog is pretty darn good when cooked properly. Raccoon isn't bad, either... if the person preparing it knows what they're doing.

Feline isn't something I'd choose to eat... but I would if I were hungry enough.

Knowing what we know about the commercial meats industry, we abstain from purchasing that which we can't track from live to butchered and packed.

I think this year we'll be getting a couple of feeder pigs to raise for the freezer. We're debating whether to process them ourselves, or take them to a small local place that will render the lard, smoke what needs to be smoked, etc...

It's really nice when one knows and can access the services of a real butcher. We usually either do it ourselves, or we barter some of the meat in exchange for processing.

Commercially processed chicken? Nasty! No thanks.


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"...for example, crow is a delicious meat. Groundhog is pretty darn good when cooked properly. Raccoon isn't bad, either..."

Well, I've eaten crow for sure, just not literally. I understand groundhog is good, as long as one removes the oil glands from the armpits first, is that right? Raccoon I've had, and it was very tasty, along with squirrel, bear, deer (of course), elk, moose, kangaroo, ostrich...you're right IMO, it's a matter of culture.

I draw the line at anything of a simian nature, though. No monkey for me.


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Yuk!

My sister has cooked and eaten squirrel with carmalized onion in a sauce - good for her happy little taste buds, Im not interested *LOL*

Someone cooked up cougar killed in the mountains. He hated it, doesnt care for wild carnivore eaters taste at all, nor cats.


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Feline is a different taste and texture, for sure, Mylab... just as canine would be. Neither are first choices, and neither would be readily accepted by our society, though they are common in others. .

Tree rat (squirrel), rabbit, turtle... various fresh water fish, like smelt, bluegill, perch, catfish and others... pheasant, dove, pigeon, duck, goose, wild turkey, quail, other fowl... raccoon, deer, bear, sheep and goat, wild boar, moose, elk, etc... all have their own flavors and textures.

Some fur trappers and hunters eat other catches, like lynx, wolverine, muskrat, etc... with nothing going to waste.. and others eat opossum, (we don't, because crows won't even pick at it.) :-)

I guess it's all an acquired taste... or dependent upon your food situation. I'd try a lot of different things if I needed the food value.

Wild boar, for instance, is richer and more full flavored than commercially grown and processed pork. I'd take the boar over the pork any day!

And I'd rather have venison than beef. The flavor is better... and it cooks up the same, as in recipes and methods. Personally, I think it's a huge waste to grind up a deer into burger, sausage, or jerky... but that can depend on the deer's diet, too... or whether the carcass is a fresh roadkill, in which case some of the meat may be damaged and not all salvageable. .

I think almost any meat that's raised organically, or naturally... free-ranged, given space and cleanliness, and fed what it would more naturally eat... will taste better. It will have decent fat or marbling, good flavor, proper texture... and it won't be pumped full of water, saline or a sugar, dyes, mixed with who knows what or glued together... or have growth hormones, preventative medicines, etc resident in trace amounts.

The state of our generally accepted, commercially produced and processed food source is disgusting, Mylab... unless one has access to the sources, or a very good organic store, finding everything needed for a decent diet can be rather difficult.

And going back to the OP... I'm fairly certain I've read that your larger commercial producers and processors do not have the sanitary conditions that an organic producer and processor would have. In other words, there's more bacteria and other nasties to be found in the larger commercial places.


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"Wild boar, for instance, is richer and more full flavored than commercially grown and processed pork. I'd take the boar over the pork any day!"

Have at it, Jodi. Boar pork can be good if it's young, but even then if it's aroused or otherwise overexcited it can be awful...or if it's been eating something not very appetizing to us, like pine roots. They are what they eat, too. All in all a lot of wild game can be very tasty when prepared in certain specific ways and one would certainly learn to enjoy it if they had to.

As far as "marbling" goes, in wild game it's not exactly like a ribeye. For example, deer fat tastes terrible. Bear fat likewise.

I too have access to wild game, but in many cases it's like Crocodile Dundee said: "Well, you can eat it, but it tastes like sh_t."


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I used Purell when my Dad was dying in the hospital. They had dispensers all over the place. Otherwise, I use castile soap and water. My son is studying biotech and works with bacterias in the lab all the time - he says that soap bursts the cells of the bacteria and kills them upon contact.

I use white vinegar all over the house. Vodka is excellent too, but expensive as a cleaner. I would not use bleach or any of the commercial cleaners anywhere near a surface where food is processed - if it's not safe to ingest it is not used in the kitchen or bath. I've heard that the combo of vinegar and food grade hydrogen peroxide is more effective.

I rarely handle raw meat, but occasionally my son brings it in the house.


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"Have at it, Jodi. Boar pork can be good if it's young, but even then if it's aroused or otherwise overexcited it can be awful...or if it's been eating something not very appetizing to us, like pine roots"

I agree Elvis. I do not care for most wild boar unless it is young. You are also correct about deer fat. Yuck.

Squirrel=OK

Rabbit=Good

Quail=Great

Turtle=A little tough if you don't know how to cook it, but wonderfully flavored

Pheasant=Good

Duck and Goose=Most definitely an acquired taste

I could go on, but this is my lengthiest post in a long time, and I do not like to type.

Actually, I will mention that I have had bear once and I greatly enjoyed it. I thought that it would have a very strong taste, but it did not.


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RE: Are you a Purell person?

You are all welcome to my share........can't abide any of it. Mind you I have not tried squirrel and have no intention of ever trying it.


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RE: Are you a Purell person?

I guess it depends on what your wild game is eating, who prepares it, and how it's prepared, then... because I've never had poor or gamy tasting boar or venison. And the fat in venison around here tastes fine.

I have to chuckle when people say you need to drown wild game in onions and garlic or otherwise overpower the meat with seasoning to make it palatable...

Where are you getting wild game from that it tastes so bad? Are you sure it's actually wild boar and venison you're getting, elvis... and not roadkill possum or feral cat wrapped and labeled for your benefit? ;-)

To us, wild boar tastes excellent whether you use catch dogs and a knife, or you shoot it... we haven't found that an "excited" boar tastes any different than one that's not. I would say that boar are in a heightened state of agitation when being hunted... but I have yet to notice whether or not they were.. "aroused"?

An odd choice of wording, I think, and perhaps one attached to a bit of lore... but not necessarily true.

To some people, wild game is an acquired taste. To us, it's the other way around... we find that commercially produced domestic fare is often bland or tasteless in comparison.

This is really noticeable in produce that's commercially mass farmed for market. Tomatoes often taste like cardboard or have no real tomato taste. This goes for other produce items, as well... and reflects on their actual nutritional value as food items, too, as we've discussed before.

Locally grown organic vegetables have robust flavors, like that which I ate as a little kid. Those full flavors tell me that the food value is actually present.

One would learn to enjoy it if they HAD to? Deductive reasoning tells me that if I don't like something, but I had to eat it, I probably wouldn't enjoy it. I'd be eating it because there wasn't another option. I might become used to eating whatever it was, but I doubt enjoyment would become a part of that.

Some people eat because they like foods... they truly do enjoy the savory or sweet tastes, and they like the various textures, whether crisp or creamy, chewy or soft, etc...

There are many food items I do enjoy eating... but my husband eats mainly because his body tells him to, needing nutrition. He doesn't enjoy most food like so many other people do. But one thing we both enjoy is the full bodied flavor of wild game.


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RE: Are you a Purell person?

In my region, a tick-bite is an immeasurably greater concern than a stomach bug.


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RE: Are you a Purell person?

You are all welcome to my share........can't abide any of it.

You many have had some and not realized it. In Italy there is a particular salami which has wild boar -- really delicious!


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RE: Are you a Purell person?

When DH was stationed in Nevada and hunted every year with a rifle , he always brought home deer, a great deal of which we ave away because he was the only one who would eat it. It was gross to me in taste and the smell of it cooking was so terrible that I would get it all together for him and he would prepare it outside on his camping burner or grill or whatever. It wasnt just me, a lot of out of state hunters didnt like the Nevada venison - they graze on sage and wild grasses which arent rich. He also used to go quail, chucker and sage hunting but silly, picky, city-bred me was too picky to even try it, not even a taste- everybody did actually consider them to be delicious. I would just have scrambled eggs for supper on those supper nights, my loss.

When he started deer/elk hunting here, I was so uninterested because of my previous experience with venison, but the difference in taste was just astounding. The wild deer/elk here have a better diet which makes for a delicious taste.

I shock other hunters because I want the vast majority of the elk or deer to be ground up with some moo fat added. Wild venison is so very, very lean that I find steaks and roasts to be tough and dry meat. However, adding a little ( not a lot) moo fat to ground venison makes it so delicious, far far better than the best moo ground meat, imo.
We have it as hamburgers, meatloaf and a nice variety of anything that can have ground beef as a start, but hamburger steaks with Tony's seasoning and chopped yellow onion is pretty much our favorite way to have it.
He will hold back some for a few steaks to use for stew or just to grill and a few very small roasts for slow cooking, but only he eats that, and not often because the prepared ground venison is much better to him also. Delicious in meatballs, spaghetti with meat sauce, lasagna etc.

I know you probably think it's a shocking ruin of good venison Jodi, especially with the addition of moo meat, but hey - different strokes ;)

He has not hunted with a rifle since the late 90's, now it is bow all the way which means that having venison in the freezer is a treat rather than the norm. He has considered going for rifle hunting again only if he partners up with someone younger who can handle doing much of the hauling of the carcass to his ATV (in exchange for a portion of meat) as his back cant handle that anymore, sadly enough. And only a rifle hunt if bow produces nothing for him, he far prefers the challenge of bow hunting even though he is mainly unsuccessful, sadly enough for my freezer.

He no longer wild turkey hunts because despite a wide range of recipes we have tried, we simply dont care for the taste at all. Heck, DH eats dark meat of Butterball turkeys only twice a year: Thanksgiving day and for one day after as leftovers and that only because he knows I love my white turkey meat from the bone (bone in only) and that is the only time I have it the whole year, as we do a domesticated, ridiculously expensive roast goose la orange style every Christmas as tradition - one I would *gladly* quit due to expense but its important to him and the lad, so it stays.
It's delicious but not that delicious!


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RE: Are you a Purell person?

Jodi: "Are you sure it's actually wild boar and venison you're getting, elvis... and not roadkill possum or feral cat wrapped and labeled for your benefit? ;-)"

Yes, pretty sure; shot from our stands, hung in our barn, butchered in our kitchen, stored in our freezer. It was venison, all right, and we enjoy it, except for the fat. Venison fat is awful tasting, and there's a pretty big consensus out there if one looks around, I'll bet. I can probably find some "proof" for you via a link. Fortunately, venison is pretty lean. We eat the backstrap right away and have the rest (except for the neck which makes a great roast) ground with pork. Speaking of pork, we didn't kill the boar, somebody else did. It did, however, look like a boar, so...

It would have to be some time after the zombies took over before I would eat road kill. I'm a food snob that way ;)

If CWD makes its way up here, we'll probably avoid venison in the future. :(


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RE: Are you a Purell person?

If you want to get rid of your germ laden possessions, send them to Hay.

Filthy Rich

When we had the anthrax scare, I kept thinking that the bad guys should forget about infesting the mail. How about our money. Into your bank deposit and let the bank sorters do the spreading for you. Can you imagine if we suddenly were afraid of our money? Chaos.

Avoid the rush. Send Hay your old, dirty money. NOW. Before it's too late.

Hay


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