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Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

Posted by rob333 (My Page) on
Mon, Apr 1, 13 at 10:35

Since Easter is stolen from Ēostre and all of the fertility stuff that goes along with the pagan festival... isn't Happy Easter the "politically" correct thing to say to an agnositc? I would see where they might have been offended should I have said "He is Risen!", but to say have a happy Easter and the answer to have been "We don't celebrate it", I was puzzled. I had said it because this the first time in years they kids/granchildren are were here. I just thought they'd have baskets and easter bunny stuff. Those things are far from the Christian observances, aren't they?

My best guess was, maybe she's Jewish? I don't know because it's a work associate's wife. After a decade of working closely with him, I still don't know his affiliation. On purpose. I don't know, nor will I ask. It's off limits to us. We both have adroitly avoided the topic. Maybe it's time for me to know? I know not to offer food to the officemate who is observing Ramadan. So maybe I should know if she's Jewish?

Or is it only "Christian" to observe Easter?


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

Well, an agnostic differs from an atheist, and might be more accepting of greetings with religious connotations... but either way, I would think it depends on the individual.

Personally, I say "Happy Bunny Day"... and no one seems to mind.

In my opinion, there are altogether too many people these days with the ability to find offense in every little aspect of life. I find it nauseating, if you want to know the truth.

If you're not happy with the way someone greets you or wishes you well, ignore them. What's so difficult about that, I ask?


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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

As Jew, given all of the "hot history" of Christians using Easter as an excuse to persecute the Jews, I'm not very fond of being wished a happy Easter. Most of the time I just assume the wisher does not know I am Jewish and the person assumes every one celebrates Easter, so I ignore them. I would be a little more offended by "He is risen," wish is highly religious and seems to assume, everyone should be celebrating.

In case you do not know any of the persecution history, I quote twocommon examples:

Jews killed Christ.
Jews use the blood of Christian infants to make matzo (The last Supper was a Passover seder with matzo).

With that kind of history, I, and most other Jews I know, are not big on people wishing us "Happy Easter." I don't get offended, I just ignore it.

But what's wrong with just wishing someone who might well not be of your religion "Good Morning" and holding your religious messages for those you know are of your religion?


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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

I agree. Everyone else was perfectly fine with have a hoppy easter. I think she's agnostic not atheist, but yes, there is a distinction.

Do you agree Happy Easter is secular?


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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

so a Jewish person sees Happy Easter (kimka your post wasn't there earlier) as relgious. Ah. So maybe she is. I would've thought it neutral and now I do not.

I do not think the Jews killed Jesus. Even if they did, it had to happen. But really, mankind caused this pain. I've never heard the blood thing before. I am sorry this has been said to you or at all.


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I used to be so politically correct but don't care so much any longer
I got in taxi this morning asked driver if he had nice Easter weekend
He said he did not celebrate but his son and daughter did he was from
Ethiopia.

I didnot get into White House but went to gates to say open open like mervyns lady. I see on television the president and mrs are having lots of fun
At the Easter egg hunt. I saw where Maggie was going. Hope she gets to enjoy her visit I will go back after I send in my next quarterly payment to the federal government maybe they will be able to let me in to see the White House before I die

To all Christians rejoice He is risen Happy Belated Easter


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  • Posted by ohiomom 3rdrockfromthesun (My Page) on
    Mon, Apr 1, 13 at 11:23

.... there are altogether too many people these days with the ability to find offense in every little aspect of life

Ya think?

:)


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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

Easter is the most important Holy Day in Catholicism , more important than Christmas....not sure about other Christian religions.

Like Christmas , it has a secular connotation and a religious meaning, however it is still, even when celebrated as a secular holiday, a Christian event.

I don't say Happy Easter or Merry Christmas when greeting people I don't know well . I say "Happy Holidays" or "Have a great long weekend" or " Best of the Season". That usually covers most of what is going on around Christmas or Easter.

Although I don't find it in any way offensive, it would be like someone saying to me " Have a Blessed Passover....." it would not offend me but I'd find it strange someone would ask me to have a blessed holy day I don't celebrate.

I think we can be over sensitive to these types of greetings but I've found it to be more spiritually uplifting for me to wish people the best without it being conditional on my faith.


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I do think ;)

________________________________
I just don't want to offend someone I know. I can't avoid everyone, but I can avoid hurting her. I am happy not to wish a Happy Easter unless the person is wearing bunny ears. Which there were a lot of this weekend? Weirdness.

Cute little girl was coming into the grocery store with ears and happily announced to me that she got chocolate at the Hallmark store! with her pink purse in one hand and the chocolate in the other. I'd never seen her before, but she was so exuberant how could I possibly resist saying "Sounds DEE-licious! I hope you enjoy it. Happy Easter!" to her? She seemed to really be into it.


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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

As an atheist, "Happy Easter" does not offend me because, well, what else is there to say to someone?

"Praise the lord, he is your savior" does offend me, because, well, no.

Myself, I celebrate gourmet chocolate animal shapes, sweet potato casserole, green beans, buttery rolls and baked ham.

My family celebrates the Jesus thing. Which is fine, go for it, but that's not my thing. But I'll gladly eat all the chocolate bunnies.


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I personally don't initiate a wish to anyone for a "Happy Easter" but I don't make a big deal of it if someone says it to me.

And I'm happy to indulge in the special sweets that appear this time of year thanks to Easter.


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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

  • Posted by kwoods Cold z7 Long Is (My Page) on
    Mon, Apr 1, 13 at 11:45

I love it when anyone includes me in any holiday they celebrate however they celebrate it even if it's just in greeting. I especially like the really "exotic" ones I would have never otherwise realized were occurring.

My little family sometimes celebrates holidays that are not part of our cultural heritage... fun and good for the kids to see other perspectives.


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I told all of our customers: "Have a great Easter weekend!"

Doesn't assume they will be celebrating Easter. Doesn't avoid the fact that Sunday was Easter either. And moreover, who --of those that did have one-- doesn't enjoy a three-day weekend?


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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

Do you agree Happy Easter is secular?

Happy Easter is certainly not secular.

From Wiki:
Easter[nb 1][nb 2] (also called the Pasch[1][2] or Pascha[nb 3][3]) is a Christian festival and holiday celebrating the resurrection of Jesus Christ on the third day after his crucifixion at Calvary as described in the New Testament.[4][5] Easter is the culmination of the Passion of Christ, preceded by Lent, a forty-day period of fasting, prayer, and penance. The last week of Lent is called Holy Week, and it contains the days of the Easter Triduum, including Maundy Thursday (also known as Holy Thursday), commemorating the Last Supper and its preceding foot washing,[6][7] as well as Good Friday, commemorating the crucifixion and death of Jesus.[8] Easter is followed by a fifty-day period called Eastertide, or the Easter Season, ending with Pentecost Sunday.

Easter Eggs are a Christian symbol as well

Again, from Wiki:
Eggs, in general, were a traditional symbol of fertility, and rebirth.[1] In Christianity, they symbolize the empty tomb of Jesus:[2][3][4] though an egg appears to be like the stone of a tomb, a bird hatches from it with life; similarly, the Easter egg, for Christians, is a reminder that Jesus rose from the grave, and that those who believe will also experience eternal life.[2

There is more information on the holidays around the internet.

There are many people who don't celebrate Easter, not only Jews. Many people who don't celebrate do not get offended but one shouldn't assume anything.

Perhaps you should go online and educate yourself on what are the icons, symbols, etc. represent as well as learn about other religions and the varying customs of each this way you won't be insulted when your good wishes are misinterpreted or found to be inappropriate to some and you can wish people the apporpriate greeting on their holiday too.

I spoke to a woman yesterday who was Christian who was upset because she feels that people ignore her celebration of the holiday. Although she does celebrate Easter, she doesn't do so at the same time as others. She is of a Eastern Orthodox religion that uses different dates and says no one every wishes her a Happy Easter because many feel that Easter was already celebrated.

I don't know anyone who gets insulted when greeted with Happy Easter just like many don't get insulted when wished a Merry Christmas but many do feel good when people recognize their holiday and greet them appropriately.

Those that do get insulted do so for a myriad of reasons including what Kimka said above.

We saw that some on this board didn't understand why so many found Palin's reference "Blood libel" offensive and continued to defend her even after they were told, so even with education some just can't see beyond their own noses.

Edited to add:
I agree Kwoods. We do the same. I am happy when anyone wishes me well and happy to celebrate anyone's holidays.As a multi-cultural, multi-religious family we embrace many holidays and greetings. I know orthodox Jews and many non-Christians that don't get offended when wished a Happy Easter. I also have encountered a Christian that was offended when greeted with Happy Passover and commented that it isn't their holiday so it isn't appropriate.

On Sunday I went into a local store, owned by Muslims and wished them a Happy Easter and they didn't even know it was Easter Sunday We both laughed since here was a Muslim and a Jew was explaining Easter to him.

We are a big country made up of many different people. It certainly would behoove many to learn about others religions, customs, etc. Perhaps then less would take offense at perceived slights when that isn't the intention and would enable people to acknowledge other holidays and our differences in a positive way.

This post was edited by epiphyticlvr on Mon, Apr 1, 13 at 12:10


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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

Yep. Now I know that it is not a secular/neutral thing. I really thought it was.

Learned something new today!


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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

I don't see Happy Easter as a religious greeting. Nor do I see Easter egg hunt as having any religious connotation.

kimka, that is interesting...I too had never heard about the blood to make matzo

From this Christians perspective, Jesus was a Jew, the Jews are God's chosen people. And we stand at the back of the line by His grace.


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Uh.....yeah.

Christians co-opted the pagan holiday about 1500 years ago, and since there aren't too many pagans left, it's now totally a Christian holiday. And Easter is a VERY Christian holiday.

I can understand how people would be offended. I would never presume to say anything about Easter unless I was sure they celebrated the holiday.

Same goes for Christmas.

I'm sure you would be, at the very least, startled, if someone wished you a Eid Sa‘īd.


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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

If someone says to me Happy Hanukkah or Happy Ramadan or Gung hay fat choy or Happy Easter or any other cultural or religious greeting I view it as a compliment. I view it as an inclusionary comment and that they want to share their religion or culture with me.

In my opinion, political correctness has gone too far to the point where greetings are viewed as insulting. I choose to view them as otherwise.


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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

Happy April Fool's Day!

-Ron-


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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

  • Posted by kwoods Cold z7 Long Is (My Page) on
    Mon, Apr 1, 13 at 13:11

Glad I live in a place where we don't "startle" easily.


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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

Startled? Nope. I even know to say "Peace be upon Him" should I speak a profit's name (both for Islam and for Christianity). Same as I don't offer food to someone who is fasting during a religious observance, regardless of which one, if I know when it's going on. It's much easier to be respectful if one knows another's observance. Of course, letting people know which one you observe can be seen as "in your face", so how does one get around this? It seems like this is a lot easier said than done. I hope those reading/participating this thread are keeping judgments to a minimum.


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Kimka, I have read much of the history connected with that particular myth and know it for the deadly propaganda it was and is. I am sorry you have been affected by it in any manner. When I was in my teens I thought that kind of viciousness had been exposed and that no one believed it any more but I keep running across groups that seemingly still carry it over from their ancestors. It is shameful and impossible to understand that kind of mentality.

I find it staggering that so many supposedly educated and aware people(even on this enlightened forum) are not acquainted with this and other propaganda that seems to be popping up more and more these days. The hatred of Israel and Jews in general on so many web sites is hard to ignore. The web has made it possible to spread entirely too many of these kinds of lies without being exposed. Certainly if someone spreads this filth it would lead me to believe that person is a cretin and worse.


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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

Do you agree Happy Easter is secular?

No way, no how.

As with Christmas and the Feast of the Circumcision, there are secular traditions associated with the Christian religious holiday of Easter (as observed in the U.S.). Were it not a religious holiday, there would be no Good Friday observances, not to mention Lent and Ash Wednesday. Were it merely a secular holiday, I doubt that we would have a national celebration of fertility symbols and spring.


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In these days of people tripping over themselves to be politically correct when it comes to greetings, it's morphed into a kind of timid silence due to a fear in acknowledging or believing in and celebrating something that someone else doesn't/might not and would thereby be offended.

Too bad, there's a richness in being greeted in a friendly way by anyone who celebrates anything.

The Orthodox Easter (Pascha) according to the Julian Calendar is coming up on May 5th. You can prepare yourself by memorizing: "Alleluia, He is risen" - particularly for the Serbians and Russians or "Christos Aneste" for the Greeks.


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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

But stated the other way, "fertility symbols" are far from Christian observances. Right?

I promise you, the person I was with was also really bewildered. Not quite as obvious as I wish it would've been.


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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

  • Posted by kwoods Cold z7 Long Is (My Page) on
    Mon, Apr 1, 13 at 15:21

Paște fericit!


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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

"fertility symbols" are far from Christian observances.

No, not true.

See Epi's post above.

Eggs, in general, were a traditional symbol of fertility, and rebirth.[1] In Christianity, they symbolize the empty tomb of Jesus:[2][3][4] though an egg appears to be like the stone of a tomb, a bird hatches from it with life; similarly, the Easter egg, for Christians, is a reminder that Jesus rose from the grave, and that those who believe will also experience eternal life.

Both Greek and Italian cooking have Easter breads that incorporate hard-boiled eggs on top of loaf.


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We missed the annual Nowruz greetings in HT this year.


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Is it something someone can declare the usual "war on"... oh wait a minute.


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Yeah... I'm a little tired of all the feigned offense and outrage of this century, not to mention the knee-jerk reactions to every little thing. Sometimes I think technological advance is overrated, though it does serve its purpose in some ways...


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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

Some people just aren't happy unless they're grousing about something.


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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

Nancy,

I think they may have been the history, but to me, I would say the Christian "symbols" are more like the three crosses I see erected outside, just for a short time, loads of white in the sanctuary, and maybe the lilies. But truly, it's more clear cut when I hear someone call it Resurrection Sunday or I hear He is Risen! He is Risen Indeed!

Eggs are finding more and more distance from the celebration. Or at least they have very little to do with services around here. Egg rolling is on the lawn at the White House. Hunts are at personal homes or are community events. But not really all that "religious". Here, at least.


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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

Eggs are finding more and more distance from the celebration.

Protestants, Catholics, Armenians, and Orthodox religions have different traditions so best not to judge celebrations on the basis of what one branch of Christianity does. As I noted above re Easter foods, eggs do figure in the traditions. Maybe not where you are, but your area might not be the best indicator of what is practiced elsewhere in the U.S.

Special Italian sweet breads were prepared for both Easter and Christmas, and much appreciated for breakfast after the long fast (which no longer exists) before communion. No food after Saturday midnight for those wishing to take communion Sunday morning guaranteed increased attendance for the earlier Masses.

Egg rolling - not sure what that is - Easter egg hunts, Easter baskets, and Easter bunnies are part of U.S. commercial interest in the holiday.


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The origin of Easter Eggs from Wiki:

History
The practice of decorating eggshell is ancient, pre-dating Christian traditions.[5] Ostrich eggs with engraved decoration that are 60,000 years old have been found in Africa.[6] Decorated ostrich eggs, and representations of ostrich eggs in gold and silver, were commonly placed in graves of the ancient Sumerians and Egyptians as early as 5,000 years ago.[7]

In particular, the custom of the Easter egg originated amongst the early Christians of Mesopotamia, who stained eggs red in memory of the blood of Christ, shed at his crucifixion.[8][9] The Christian Church officially adopted the custom, regarding the eggs as a symbol of the resurrection; in A.D. 1610, Pope Paul V proclaimed the following prayer:[8][9]

Bless, O Lord! we beseech thee, this thy creature of eggs, that it may become a wholesome sustenance to thy faithful servants, eating it in thankfulness to thee on account of the resurrection of the Lord.[8][9]

The Easter egg tradition may also have merged into the celebration of the end of the privations of Lent in the West. Historically, it was traditional to use up all of the household's eggs before Lent began. Eggs were originally forbidden during Lent as well as on other traditional fast days in Western Christianity (this tradition still continues among the Eastern Christian Churches). Likewise, in Eastern Christianity, both meat and dairy are prohibited during the Lenten fast, and eggs are seen as "dairy" (a foodstuff that could be taken from an animal without shedding its blood)[citation needed]. This established the tradition of Pancake Day being celebrated on Shrove Tuesday. This day, the Tuesday before Ash Wednesday when Lent begins, is also known as Mardi Gras, a French phrase which translates as "Fat Tuesday" to mark the last consumption of eggs and dairy before Lent begins.

In the Orthodox Church, Great Lent begins on Clean Monday, rather than Wednesday, so the household's dairy products would be used up in the preceding week, called Cheesefare Week. During Lent, since chickens would not stop producing eggs during this time, a larger than usual store might be available at the end of the fast if the eggs had not been allowed to hatch. The surplus, if any, had to be eaten quickly to prevent spoiling. Then, with the coming of Easter, Pascha the eating of eggs resumes.

One would have been forced to hard boil the eggs that the chickens produced so as not to waste food, and for this reason the Spanish dish hornazo (traditionally eaten on and around Easter) contains hard-boiled eggs as a primary ingredient. In Hungary, eggs are used sliced in potato casseroles around the Easter period.

Decoration and symbolism
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In the Orthodox and Eastern Catholic Churches, Easter eggs are dyed red to represent the blood of Christ, shed on the Cross, and the hard shell of the egg symbolized the sealed Tomb of Christ ��" the cracking of which symbolized his resurrection from the dead. Easter eggs are blessed by the priest at the end of the Paschal Vigil (which is equivalent to Holy Saturday), and distributed to the faithful. Each household also brings an Easter basket to church, filled not only with Easter eggs but also with other Paschal foods such as paskha, kulich or Easter breads, and these are blessed by the priest as well.[citation needed]. The egg is seen by followers of Christianity as a symbol of resurrection: while being dormant it contains a new life sealed within it.[citation needed]

Similarly, in the Roman Catholic Church in Poland, the so-called święconka, i.e. blessing of decorative baskets with a sampling of Easter eggs and other symbolic foods, is one of the most enduring and beloved Polish traditions on Holy Saturday.

During Paschaltide, in some traditions the Pascal greeting with the Easter egg is even extended to the deceased. On either the second Monday or Tuesday of Pascha, after a memorial service people bring blessed eggs to the cemetery and bring the joyous paschal greeting, "Christ has risen", to their beloved departed (see Radonitza).

Christian Traditions
While the origin of Easter eggs can be explained in the symbolic terms described above, a sacred tradition among followers of Eastern Christianity says that Mary Magdalene was bringing cooked eggs to share with the other women at the tomb of Jesus, and the eggs in her basket miraculously turned brilliant red when she saw the risen Christ. The egg represents the boulder of the tomb of Jesus.[17]

A different, but not necessarily conflicting legend concerns Mary Magdalene's efforts to spread the Gospel. According to this tradition, after the Ascension of Jesus, Mary went to the Emperor of Rome and greeted him with "Christ has risen," whereupon he pointed to an egg on his table and stated, "Christ has no more risen than that egg is red." After making this statement it is said the egg immediately turned blood red.[18]

Parallels in other faiths

The egg is widely used as a symbol of the start of new life, just as new life emerges from an egg[dubious ��" discuss] when the chick hatches out[citation needed].

The ancient Zoroastrians painted eggs for Nowruz, their New Year celebration, which falls on the Spring equinox. The tradition continues among Persians of Islamic, Zoroastrian, and other faiths today. The Nowruz tradition has existed for at least 2,500 years. The sculptures on the walls of Persepolis show people carrying eggs for Nowruz to the king.[citation needed]

There are good grounds for the association between hares (later termed Easter bunnies) and eggs, through folklore confusion between hares' forms (where they raise their young) and plovers' nests.[19]

There are also parallels (though no direct connection) between the easter egg tradition and the celebration of Passover in Judaism, notable because in Christian tradition, Christ was celebrating Passover with his disciples on the evening before Good Friday[citation needed]. An egg is one of the components of a traditional Seder plate, a traditional centerpiece of the Passover meal[citation needed]. The tradition of hiding easter eggs for children to find is also similar to another Passover tradition, whereby the head of the household hides a piece of matza (the "afikomen") during the meal[citation needed]. After the meal, the children search the home for the afikomen, and are rewarded once it is found[citation needed].

Lots of good info out there Robb including the history of the White House Easter Egg Roll which was started in the 1800's to celebrate Easter.. It wasn't started to celebrate Passover or Norwaz and one doesn't see egg rolls sponsored by synagogues, mosques or secular organizations.


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Eggs and bread are most definitely part of the Eastern European and Greek tradition of Easter and are religious symbols unlike the commercial symbols they have become here in North America.

I have a Ukrainian friend and painted Easter Eggs, egg bread along with fish are a huge part of their Good Friday and Easter Saturday religious celebration. They don;t do the Easter Bunny thing....


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The ancient Zoroastrians painted eggs for Nowruz, their New Year celebration, which falls on the Spring equinox. The tradition continues among Persians of Islamic, Zoroastrian, and other faiths today.

Double reason to decorate eggs in spring!

I'll have to do a search for images...


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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

Now I am thoroughly confused. Eggs may be at lunch/dinner celebrations and commercial (which I see as purely secular), but what do they have to do with a religious ceremony?


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It would be like someone saying to me " Have a Blessed Passover....." it would not offend me but I'd find it strange someone would ask me to have a blessed holy day I don't celebrate.

That sums it up. The fact that people are surprised when someone's response is "I don't celebrate that holiday" is mind boggling to me. It would never occur to me to say "Happy Passover" to someone when I don't know that someone's religion. I am not sure why Christians are so surprised when someone doesn't celebrate their holiday.

I have never once heard anyone claim that Easter is secular. That was a new one for me.


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As "secular" as Christmas. Better? Would you consider that to be wholly a holy day? We still were trying to be kind, not expecting anyone to be Christian. That seems an odd thing to say? Where was that stated?


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I don't think eggs, per se, are part of the religious celebration of Easter, but of the festive celebration of Easter, that most, if not all, Christian cultures have, that is, Easter dinner.

Every holiday or holy day, no matter how insignificant, seems to have a feast associated with it. And the feasting can be a lavish celebration, compared to the solemnity of the religious observance. This seems to be a part of all cultures, no matter what the underlying belief system is.


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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

I don't expect you'll understand, Rob. You couldn't understand why saying "Merry Christmas" to everyone might be insulting to those that do not celebrate. So, I do not expect you to understand the same thing with Easter. I'm just always amazed at Christian's surprise at people reacting negatively when they assume everyone celebrates their holiday. It's something I've only experienced with some Christians. I've never met anyone of another religion that assumes others celebrate their holidays. I don't know, maybe it has something to do with where one grows up and how much diversity they are exposed to.


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Last Thursday, my Muslim cab driver who emigrated from Jordan 3 yrs ago , took the initiative to wish me a Happy Easter weekend. On Sat, the Buddhist guy working at the gas station wished me a Happy Easter. We had Easter dinner yesterday with our mixed bag of friends at a Muslim from Sri Lankan's home.

You can bet that I wished them all a Happy Easter in return for their good wishes to me!


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Good for you jmc and the others!

I find that tolerance of other people and their customs are a good anecdote to perpetually being offended !


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"Isnt Happy Easrter the politically correct thing to say to,an agnostic" from the OP.

No, why would you assume an agnostic is a pagan?

""Paganism" (or "Neopaganism") has become the identifier for a collection of new religious movements attempting to continue, revive, or reconstruct historical pre-Christian religion.[2]"
this is a simple definition from wiki.

I think we a re far less PC i Australia.

We are a nation led by an athiest...and we have 2 paid holiday days for easter. (Good friday and easter monday) and people of all beliefs or no beliefs participate with equal gusto.

those with no or non christian beliefs can then chose to work and get paid double time!


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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

Good for you jmc and the others!
I find that tolerance of other people and their customs are a good anecdote to perpetually being offended !


In that spirit I hope you also wished your Jewish friends a Happy Passover over the last 8 days (it ended tonight) and your Persian friends the blessings of happiness, prosperity and love as one does to those who celebrate that.

I only noticed your Easter greetings here on HT.

Jill, I understand where you are coming from. I hadn't ever met people who are so concerned or disturbed about this until I came here to HT where it seems that some can't see beyond their own noses. I guess we no longer will have this circular conversation only in December as it was for many years, we have now moved it to bi-annually.


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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

I don't see where you can point anything I did that said I expected someone to be Christian? Actually, I've asked the question so as to avoid doing that to her or anyone like her ever again. I can fully assure you my world is highly diverse and I fully accept folks who have cultures that are different than mine. It was the point of the thread. So if you are trying to point these things out to me, then I believe you are somehow blinded? It's just so odd you have read any of it in such a way? Not that I truly want to know. It's just sad.

:(


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I personally get offended at people who are offended at people who are offended. It is rude to offend others-I aim to not be rude-so now if I try not to be rude I am being politically correct which is a passive agressive way of saying you have no right to be offended since I (so far as I admit) had no intention of being offensive even if my offensiveness is ignorance-that being something I could do something about but wont because I dont want to be forced to be politically correct-hmmmmm.


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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

Duluth: "Too bad, there's a richness in being greeted in a friendly way by anyone who celebrates anything."

I second that. :)


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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

Rob, I think it is just a perception thing. There are some within the church who are railing to take back the holiday from the paganism it is infused with (I think this is more a Protestant thing, especially Protestants who have not grown up with rich traditions surrounding Easter). Then, there are others who take great pride in pointing out the Pagan origins of some of these traditions.

I think the kindest thing is if you do not know where somebody stands, to make the comment on it being a wonderful day. Or, if one is compelled to wish someone a Happy Easter and that person is offended, quickly backtrack and wish them a beautiful Sunday. Personally I am getting to the point I want to tell other Christians to just shut up and let me celebrate it the way I see fit, even if that means chocolate marshmallow bunnies for breakfast. That in no way lessens the meaning of the day, it just helps me to get to church on time.


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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

being agnostic is not the same as being a pagan. that is just ignorance


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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

I am an atheist but heck, I love Easter. I set a beautiful formal table which is something I get a great deal of enjoyment from doing- make a wonderful meal, create little Easter baskets for everyone who is in our home at the time and if, like this year, its just us - I make the baskets for just us, and yes, our dogs, who fully appreciated the contents. Have my little china easter bunnies on the mantle and my pastel alabaster eggs in a cut glass dish on a table, little teensy tiny spring flower bouquets arranged at each table setting, I have a wonderful time with Easter.

Love it.

Love all the holidays.

I go all out and do Christmas, halloween, Thanksgiving, Independence day, St. Pats day, Oktoberfest, birthdays (celebrated over the span of an entire weekend, as well as anniversaries and momentous dates)and any other celebratory day somebody can think of - even sometimes a " just because" celebratory days - usually in the summertime and involving an assortment of neighbors and barbeque grills.
If somebody wishes me a Happy Passover, Im grateful that someone - a total stranger- thought to take the time to offer me a good wish of any sort, .
As long as the intent is pure - why, in this hate and bigoted filled, petty world, Im grateful for every single good will and pleasantry offered my way and I will cheerfully and gratefully accept the wish without examining the horse's teeth. And then I return the wish with cheer and a kind heart, because after all, it costs me nothing more than the price I, myself, attach to it.
Such a rare gift it is, after all, in this world.

My take on it.

It strikes me that about once a year we have this same discussion - with pretty much the same sort of reactions, perhaps even from the same people although on that one specific, I don't really recall.
But I suspect that everyone is pretty much dug in on how they feel or react to well wishes offered for whatever holiday might be at hand.


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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

I am an atheist but heck, I love Easter. I set a beautiful formal table which is something I get a great deal of enjoyment from doing- make a wonderful meal, create little Easter baskets for everyone who is in our home at the time and if, like this year, its just us - I make the baskets for just us, and yes, our dogs, who fully appreciated the contents. Have my little china easter bunnies on the mantle and my pastel alabaster eggs in a cut glass dish on a table, little teensy tiny spring flower bouquets arranged at each table setting, I have a wonderful time with Easter.

Love it.

Love all the holidays.

I go all out and do Christmas, halloween, Thanksgiving, Independence day, St. Pats day, Oktoberfest, birthdays (celebrated over the span of an entire weekend, as well as anniversaries and momentous dates)and any other celebratory day somebody can think of - even sometimes a " just because" celebratory days - usually in the summertime and involving an assortment of neighbors and barbeque grills.
If somebody wishes me a Happy Passover, Im grateful that someone - a total stranger- thought to take the time to offer me a good wish of any sort, .
As long as the intent is pure - why, in this hate and bigoted filled, petty world, Im grateful for every single good will and pleasantry offered my way and I will cheerfully and gratefully accept the wish without examining the horse's teeth. And then I return the wish with cheer and a kind heart, because after all, it costs me nothing more than the price I, myself, attach to it.
Such a rare gift it is, after all, in this world.

My take on it.

It strikes me that about once a year we have this same discussion - with pretty much the same sort of reactions, perhaps even from the same people although on that one specific, I don't really recall.
But I suspect that everyone is pretty much dug in on how they feel or react to well wishes offered for whatever holiday might be at hand.


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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

I've asked the question so as to avoid doing that to her or anyone like her ever again

I can't imagine anyone considering Easter to be anything but a religious holiday.


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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

An agnostic could be described as someone sitting on the fence of religious belief... not really sure, but hanging on just in case.

Paganism is as described above by Youngquinn...

Atheism is NOT believing in any deity or religious ideas, at all.

Other religions are too numerous to describe individually.

It seems to be an American thing to be constantly offended by every little thing... and it gets mighty old mighty quick. I don't care what greeting a person uses... they're acknowledging me, and that's the bottom line. I often use a generic response of "and the same to you" expressed with a smile. Does the job, and everybody's happy.


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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

To clarify, I meant if it is so deeply rooted in NON-Christian roots, was it not also fully secular? But I have my answer now.

I surely didn't mean atheist/agnostic/secular/anything NON-Christian equates with pagan! Last thing I meant.

EDITED TO ADD THIS:
I think, if someone asks to know more, but they have been ignorant, maybe a kind response to their ignorance would be to explain it. At least I asked and didn't think I was in the right. I knew something was wrong, but what, I didn't know. Now I do. I can't help but feel reacting poorly to them, will shut down people to understanding.

This post was edited by rob333 on Tue, Apr 2, 13 at 7:52


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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

It seems to be an American thing to be constantly offended by every little thing

How naive.

You can bet in a Muslim country NO ONE wished ANYONE a Happy Easter. Since that would be a capitol offense, assuming the person lived long enough to be arrested and tried before they are executed.


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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

I find that tolerance of other people and their customs are a good anecdote to perpetually being offended !

Yes, absolutely correct. Which is why I would never wish someone a Happy religous holiday if I didn't know what religion they were.

To clarify - I am not offended if someone wishes me a Happy Easter. Or a Merry Christmas. Or any other Christian or non-Christian holiday I do not celebrate. The only time I am offended by it is when it is done by someone who knows I am Jewish and do not celebrate those holidays and they do it anyway because to them it's not religous and secular, and they refuse to acknowledge not everyone thinks their way. Yes, I've encountered these types of people.

Rob - I think it's great you asked. And it's great you understand now. But, the fact that you thought Easter was a secular holiday is kind of shocking to me. I'm just having a hard time understanding how that's possible. Unless you've only been around Christians that celebrate the holiday and never experienced anyone that didn't. I just find it amazing and had never heard anyone say that. Christmas yes because of the commercial side, I think. But, Easter, never.


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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

I can see how someone who was not religious might not know that Easter was predominately a religious occasion. However, I was really surprised when Mrs said " I don't see Happy Easter as a religious greeting" .

This from a professed devout Christian is mind boggling given the significance of Easter in the established , mainstream, Christian faiths such as Anglican, Catholic...and many others. Easter is the most important Christian Holy Day in these faiths. More important than Christmas.

Maybe that's the problem, maybe those of " faith" who wish others a Happy Easter simply don't understand what Easter is...could that be?


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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

I'm not quite sure how this string morphed into people being offended by greetings.

Rob333 asked why a person might not react happily to Easter greetings and wasn't Easter secular? I explained why Jews can have a special sensitivity around Easter, especially a very religious greeting like He is Risen; that this is a history of the holiday being used as a basis for persecution, even beyond the usual. With a little imagination--would the child or grandchild of concentration camp survivors be more sensitized to such a greeting, especially during Passover. More likely, she may have assumed that you knew she was Jewish (or whatever) and thought you were being a bit deliberately provocative.
I and others said, we are not offended, we ignore the religious offering.

That's all. People dial it back. If someone says Happy Easter to me, I say Happy Sunday or Good Morning or whatever back. Who is offended here?

Start preaching at me that He is Risen and you may find yourself being offered a conversation about how Jesus doesn't fulfill any of the Jewish prophecies about the Messiah. After all, sauce for the goose.... But there's no anger here.

This is a whole nother nut from spending taxpayers' cash to put up decorations for one religion's holiday.


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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

I appreciate the feedback, Jill.

To be honest, I would only describe these two holidays (that are also holy days) to be "equal parts" to the secular. Or I would've thought they were, but maybe that's just the commercialism part that has so comingled tself into it (certainly more than ages before!)? I guess I just didn't know the weight some people give the religious connotations. Nothing like Memorial day or Halloween.

I don't understand your amazement and think that is where we part ways. There are plenty of Jewish, Islamic, Sikh, and non-religious folks (I think I've covered those who I know fully. I knew one wiccan, but I don't see her anymore (more than 15 years)) with whom I see and interact. My guess is, they just don't care to have let me know before? But I am glad she let me know this time. Now I know. Good to be wiser!


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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

I'm sorry you don't understand me chase. For me, Easter signifies the resurrection of my Lord. For others, Easter signifies chocolate bunnies and eggs. Happy Easter is generic, not being offensive to anyone. My greeting to the brethren would be, His is risen. That might offend some.


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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

Saying that it SEEMS to be an American thing to be offended by every little thing, Mom, is not naive... for one thing, it's an opinion... and for another, I'd say it's a rather astute observation after sitting on this forum panel for years... if you get my meaning!

The only thing that really bothers me regarding religion and personal exchanges between myself and others is when someone finds out something about my life... like the fact that I have Lupus, for example... and they try to hold their hand over my head and pray out loud. That bothers me. First of all, to my knowledge no prayers have ever been tangibly answered... and second, I do not believe in any deity making it an exercise in futility. It makes me very uncomfortable.

A lot of other things bother me about various religions and the workings of their organizations, and one only has to look as far as some of the threads Joe posted in the past to understand an inkling of what I mean...

But as far as simple greetings... does it really matter if it was a well intended greeting? As long as we're able to maintain a separation between church and state, I'll be happy... and I suspect a lot of others will be, as well.



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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

I guess Mrs it all depends on what weight one gives to the Resurrection vs the Easter Bunny. If one holds the secular aspect to be the central point, or if one holds the secular and religious aspects to be equally important, then saying Happy Easter is most definitely not a religious expression.

However if one hold the Resurrection to be the more significant aspect of Easter then it is a religious expression. That is why I am surprised that you think it is generic...which is of course your right.

As far as it being offensive......that is entirely the perspective of the the one receiving the greeting. Anyone saying Happy Easter to someone they know would be offended is definitely not acting as a Christian.


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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

Even I, a Jew-athiest (a phrase coined by a friend's son while attending Hebrew School meaning culturally Jewish, but do not believe in god), knows that Easter is the most holy holiday in the Christian religion.

I actually think if I were religous and were Christian, I would be annoyed at the "secular" side of Easter and Christmas. But, hard to say for sure since I am neither.


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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

To answer your last paragraph Jill, YES (emphatically!), I find it annoying. But I tolerate it. The older I get, the more I gravitate towards less and less of my participation in any of the commercial aspect of it all. Seems like the focus is off. For religious aspects, those should be in the home and the sanctuary. For the secular side, simpler is still better. How about that, separtion of church and life? Dunno what you call it. I don't want to see loads of floaty, glittery stuff everywhere, but I am not going to carry around my bible and lay hands on (sorry Jodi! that shouldn't happen to you) anyone.

Peaceful hope and joyous anticpation towards the friend and family portions of it all for everyone though, religious or secular. I try to find the commonality of it.


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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

Jill, I have much admiration for Jews, Muslims, Hindus and others...actually pretty much every NON Christian religion... that has keep the secular out of their Holy Days.

I think that Christians, especially North American Christians , have let their Holy Days become so commercialized because , although they may say they are Christian, they are Christians by birth only and do not actively practice their faith


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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

"To clarify - I am not offended if someone wishes me a Happy Easter. Or a Merry Christmas. Or any other Christian or non-Christian holiday I do not celebrate. The only time I am offended by it is when it is done by someone who knows I am Jewish and do not celebrate those holidays and they do it anyway because to them it's not religous and secular, and they refuse to acknowledge not everyone thinks their way. Yes, I've encountered these types of people."

*

Well, I can certainly understand questioning the motives of why someone would wish them a Happy Easter if they KNEW someone was Jewish, or of a different religion, etc.

But then, there are simply people that are ignorant of other religions and what they believe, so I guess I can see it happening without malice even if they knew someone wasn't Christian.


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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

It sure is hard to judge the intent, heart, and mind of another person. I guess we just have to assume the best of them? I try to.


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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

  • Posted by kwoods Cold z7 Long Is (My Page) on
    Tue, Apr 2, 13 at 11:00

"It sure is hard to judge the intent, heart, and mind of another person."

"It makes me very uncomfortable."

It used to make me uncomfortable when someone would say "I'll pray for you..." or "Have a blessed...", now I just think it's kinda cool. It means they're thinking of me and mine and want the best for us.

I do know some who try to use their religion to mete out judgement, imply "betterness" or "otherness". That's about who they are as a person and has got nothing to do with their religion as far as I'm concerned. It also doesn't have anything to do with me... doesn't bother me much to be judged... I'm good with me.

Easter is secular in my world because... well, everything is secular in my world. At the same time, I acknowledge that there are many worlds out there every one of which is just as valid and deserving of respect as mine. Not everyone lives in my world, thankfully and I shouldn't expect them to.


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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

It used to make me uncomfortable when someone would say "I'll pray for you..." or "Have a blessed...", now I just think it's kinda cool. It means they're thinking of me and mine and want the best for us.

*

It is, they are, I'm glad you realize that.


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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

Easter is secular in other people's worlds too. My DH is a messianic Jew, so we celebrate Passover and Easter. Both are important holidays to us and it is not secular.

However, his brother (obviously Jewish, not Messianic) and his wife colored eggs with their daughter and put out a facebook greeting of Happy Easter. For them it is a fun day. Does it have the same relavence to them as it does to my family? Of course not, but it definitely illustrates why a situation like Robs can come up. People are all over the map on this holiday.


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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

I don't see why Easter cannot be secular to some and religious to others, depending upon one's belief system. All cultures have found ways to celebrate the coming of spring from time immemorial. I don't take offense at the greeting of "Happy Easter" because for me this is not an important battle to fight. I come down on the side of tolerance but I don't want anyone thrusting their prayers and/or relgion in my face. As someone here said, I will be contented so long as separation of church and state is maintained.


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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

But then, there are simply people that are ignorant of other religions and what they believe, so I guess I can see it happening without malice even if they knew someone wasn't Christian.

Agree. Clearly Rob had no malice.

As I said, it usually doesn't offend me unless the person is clearly trying to offend me.

Chase - don't give us Jews too much credit. Chanukah is totally comercialized here in the US. It's not a religous holiday at all, but it has turned into a competition with xmas in that regard. And I am as guilty (or more) as anyone else. But, it's true that the other religious holidays are not commercialized.


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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

Easter is a CHRISTIAN holiday. If you want to wish someone a happy, non-denominational Spring, just say, Happy Vernal Equinox. 'Easter' is supposed to be about something more than stuffing ones mouth with chocolate, coloring some hardboiled eggs, and wearing a favorite, pastel Easter bonnet. Why any Christian doesn't get this is truly beyond me, but speaks volumes about contemporary, Christian, religious life in America.


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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

Speaking as a contemporary, Christian-I am completley disinterested in shoving my lifestyle on anyone else. I am more than happy to allow others to do what they wish.

If one really wants someone to change, if they feel that strongly, then one should pray about it. There is work to be done. But let the Holy Ghost to do the work.


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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

Why not just wish someone a nice day or something similar? If one doesn't know them or what they do or do not celebrate that would cover it without risking offending anyone by accident. If you then find out that they are celebrating the holiday you can always add - Happy (insert holiday) or you could always ask if they are celebrating the holiday and if they reply yes, then wish them a Happy ___. There are many ways one can greet or wish someone well that you don't know without risking offending them.


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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

I just read this entire thread and have to say it is the strangest thread I think I have ever read here! Lol

From pagen to politically correct to the idea if saying He has Risen! To someone....now the Holy Ghost! Boo!

Sorry...it's hysterical! I would never wish someone anything if I didn't know...just is weird and to think a happy Easter greeting could be considered secular?...and I don't know any Jewish people that color eggs or hang with the bunny.

Just be happy!


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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

' and they try to hold their hand over my head and pray out loud. '

No! Does that sort of thing happen in the US? Anyone did that to me and I would be tempted to punch them in the effing nose.

I am staggered, Jodik?


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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

Maybe the crazy E train guy...lol

So true Epi...have a nice day or weekend.


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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

now, now Maggie. Making fun of the Holy Ghost could be construed as disrespectful. I am fully kidding in my chiding tone. Just keep in mind my comment was for the Christian. Not for everyone!

:)


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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

Sorry...the entire thread just hit my funny bone. But, my humor isn't for everyone!


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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

Maybe not everyone, but I find it funny.

:)


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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

You mean to say, campanula, you've never been accosted in a supermarket parking lot by someone holding a Bible aloft and demanding to know if you've been saved?


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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

Big chocolate, Easter bunny far less controversial than the Father, Son, or
Holy Ghost.

And just for the record, eggs do play a role in Passover as well. They are eaten at the beginning of the Passover meal (most Jewish families do not color them, but they may...in beet juice...all, w.o., religious confusion as the Passover celebration goes behind the egg--a symbol), ... and, one would hope, Easter is more than the big chocolate bunny, or the ancient pagan acknowledgement of the equinox, for those that profess to celebrate this holiday.


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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

Definitely. "Good morning" and a smile works for me 365 days of the year. Never antagonized anyone yet.


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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

Has GW developed a hiccup? I didn't put any spaces in Good or anyone and they didn't show up in the preview.


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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

Must be... My post not here...I think I wrote...

NJ, I sit at a Seder table every year and am very familiar with the Seder plate.

I love Easter...everything from the bunny and eggs, the Lenten season from Ash Wednesday to Easter Sunday...to candy and patent leather Mary Janes and bonnets. Reflection, penance, and redemption....it has it all and yes I profess to celebrate. Hope that is suitable. Really, why would anybody care.


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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

Well steve, you didn't work for my boss. I would say good morning! and every day and he'd growl. One day, he said, WHO says it is?! and I replied, I do!!!!! For weeks. He laughed and never growled again. But a for a bit, it sure did antagonize him. People can find fault no matter what one does.
;)


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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

NJ, the egg as used on a Seder plate was addressed above in the copy and paste from Wiki. It is used at Passover to symbolize mourning and dipped in salt water (tears). Boiled and sometimes roasted but not dyed.

Edited to add this from my post above:
There are also parallels (though no direct connection) between the easter egg tradition and the celebration of Passover in Judaism, notable because in Christian tradition, Christ was celebrating Passover with his disciples on the evening before Good Friday[citation needed]. An egg is one of the components of a traditional Seder plate, a traditional centerpiece of the Passover meal[citation needed]. The tradition of hiding easter eggs for children to find is also similar to another Passover tradition, whereby the head of the household hides a piece of matza (the "afikomen") during the meal[citation needed]. After the meal, the children search the home for the afikomen, and are rewarded once it is found[citation needed].

This post was edited by epiphyticlvr on Tue, Apr 2, 13 at 18:17


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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

sheepishly posting again, but just to fully close it with a humorous anecdote

I had someone visit me at work, with whom I spent the day, who outright asked me if my boss was Jewish (they commented on articles decorating the office and I said you mean the tchotchkes?). I admitted, we'd never discussed it, but that I'd innocently wished the spouse a PURELY platonic Happy Easter (for the grandkids)... and they immediately said, yep! Jewish. We just giggled. The visitor is Jewish and we had this delightful conversation about how Yiddish words are so fantastically descriptive in a way no other language is. But, I now know there is no such thing as "platonic Easter" for his family. Off limits! Not that I would've ever said it again.

;)


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RE: Is saying Happy Easter a "Christian" thing?

Sigh.... So much hostility over wishing someone joy. Admittedly not everyone celebrates the same holidays so we should not go out of our way to offend or be offended but if I see my neighbor showing some indication they do celebrate a particular day I see no reason not to say have a good day. I don't have to specify. If I wish to understand more, I can ask about what the symbol might represent.

One of my most pleasant memories is the time I opened the front door to several of the neighborhood children. They were all Jewish and each carried a dozen eggs. They said their parents told them I would explain Easter to them. We spent the next few hours coloring eggs and talking about what they represented to different people and how much fun it was to make the eggs pretty. I had several thank yous from the parents later. Some of them had no idea of the relationship of eggs and bunnies and how they fit in Christian beliefs let alone other beliefs and were pleased I didn't preach, just explained very briefly why the symbols were used. The whole thing was not a religious lesson, it was simply an excuse for making a mess and having fun.

I learned a lot about different holidays living in an almost all Jewish neighborhood where many were orthodox. Most of it was just having a good time even if our backgrounds were different. Halloween was an eyeopener.


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