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Pouring,pouring,pouring rain!!!

Posted by dragonflydee Z8AL (My Page) on
Fri, Apr 18, 14 at 15:59

But I left all my container butterfly garden plants lined up against the
Cypress lumber lapped siding of my house.
Outside.On a deck.Against the exterior wall,clear of the drip line.

All the birds are in the thickets; so are the butterflies.

Getting started in terms of Inground plantings is delayed this weekend.

We built this house doing a lot of our own construction ourselves.
This was after saving enough to pay for what you need without
Taking on a mortgage.
I know a lot of people can't or don't want to do this for a variety
Of reasons; but we made a go of it.

We have been in the house abt 33 years.

I am not happy about the current lack of opportunity for so many
Working class Americans to make more choices regarding
How they plan their lifestyle.

DD


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Pouring,pouring,pouring rain!!!

  • Posted by rosie Southeast 7A/B (My Page) on
    Fri, Apr 18, 14 at 16:48

Now, I think there's all the opportunity in the world. :) What's lacking are independence of thought, guts, and imagination. What you have, in fact.

It's been pouring, pouring, pouring at our homes in two states, the tide so high this afternoon our boat dock is almost submerged.


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RE: Pouring,pouring,pouring rain!!!

We have had a very wet late winter early spring-not too unusual here but it has been impeding the recovery of bodies from the Oso mudslide. 39 found so Far and they say only 4 more to go. It does put life into perspective.


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RE: Pouring,pouring,pouring rain!!!

Oh - what I would have given, would have loved - to build a house of our own design, doing a lot of construction ourselves ( neither of us can be trusted to use a hammer and nail without the great possibility of an ER visit) or/ and having no mortgage. More power to you DD, I think that is just fabulous! Who wouldnt, I cant imagine who would think it a poor choice.

We did something similar ( kinda sorta)another way, for many years we paid only cash for our vehicles - and kept them forever in car years, never less than ten. Last trade in last year was bought new (honda) in 1987, made in 1986, a leftover which was marked down because it was the previous year model. We have never owned a luxury vehicle, luckily it has never been something important to either of us.
We were prepared to pay cash for our last two purchases but the interest rate was 0 for three years, it made more sense to have that money make more money and take the 0 percent deal and take a three year car note. He CAN work on cars, so he keeps them up. Leasing isnt a consideration.

But oh - to have no mortgage and to have built our own house in more the way I would have wanted it, still being a very inexpensive home? Would have been so, so happy. As im sure you are DD, and good for you!

We bought this little piece of kinda carp and did a tremendous amount of upgrades ourselves though, learning as we went. Replaced everything save the walls. Even the interior doors were replaced, upgraded, new hardware, new decent quality toilets, sinks, shower - the cabinets and tub did remain and we paid to have good windows put in - all in the space of about 15 years.
Im not happy with the cheap hardwood floors a friend of his helped/ showed and helped him install. The installation was fine, the hardwood was not what I really wanted and have never been happy with.
Ive about convinced him they need replacing, they just didnt work out. Sad, because after my retiring, right before the bottom fell out I regretted I did not work one more year to get great floors so ended up taking a job just to buy those floors - the financial bottom had hit the nation, only made a buck above minimum wage - and was incredibly lucky to get the job in the first place and knew it.

I hated the job and stuck it through, putting in my notice and then quitting the day I had the funds to replace all the carpeting and tile the bathroom floors at the same time. Im not sure I am willing do that again and 63 year old women, despite being in most excellent shape and willing to work for less, simply dont have jobs offered to them despite great contacts, great experience and a long history of an excellent employment record. That is not how this world turns, unfortunately.
Perhaps we will do a dip into some little stock I have which has under performed quite pathetically for the last 7 years. Maybe get something out of it instead of it stagnating. It not much but its mine that I bought - I wont touch our retirement stash for such a frivolous "I wanna!" flooring replacement.

I wish we could have done what you guys did, even on our tiny house budget- its * fabulous* with a capital F and Im green with envy!

I hope this thread takes off, I love it and could pause the negative feelings amongst us usual participants ( we know who we are, not you DD) and maybe have a little fun thread for awhile. Maybe even hitting 150.......... with a part 2!

O.k. maybe that's a tad bit too much to hope for!
;)

Thanks for this, D.D.

This post was edited by mylab123 on Fri, Apr 18, 14 at 17:30


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RE: Pouring,pouring,pouring rain!!!

Trying to make the connection between rain and absence or existence of mortgages….


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RE: Pouring,pouring,pouring rain!!!

"Trying to make the connection between rain and absence or existence of mortgages…."

Try this: All those April showers on the roof, which is or isn't paid for, and may or may not leak depending on whether or not it is a piece of "carp."


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RE: Pouring,pouring,pouring rain!!!

Well

Pn are you trying to insinuate yourself into this thread?

Welcome...as long as you behave...lest these ladies rip you to shreds

Also don't go driving off into any tar pits...

I would really hate that...

DD


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RE: Pouring,pouring,pouring rain!!!

Hmmm…


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RE: Pouring,pouring,pouring rain!!!

I also think it's a shame that the opportunities to own a home, particularly for young people, just aren't there with the present economy.

I do think that many young people, with jobs more scarce and less reliable long term, coupled with higher costs in construction and lack of stability geographically, many just won't be able to build a home.

While we did build one home we lived in less than two years, this house was the result of years of planning and owning the property for over five years before building began. Planning the house was every bit if not more satisfying than actually seeing it come to fruition and living in it, although a close friend recently told me he had never seen anyone enjoy their home as I do. Every time I walk across the wood floors (yes, it was a splurge for me, mylab) I enjoy them, and that is every day.
Every time I see the sun shine on a certain paint color on a wall, I enjoy it. I enjoy the way the morning sun shines through the Scottish lace cotton cafe curtains--it reminds me of fond memories at my grandmother's house. There is great pleasure in dreaming, sacrificing, saving, making decisions, and seeing those dreams come to fruition--whether you build a home or make a home in any other way--large, small, more permanent, temporary.

Gardens are the same, and now that I have entirely restored the vegetable garden and the flower gardens are on their way to being restored (not to the level DH had them but it's better than the weeds that grew up for several years) there is even more pleasure which brings hope for the future and the comfort of memories and joy that those gardens brought my spouse.

We, too have had the usual April showers and this is the most lush time of year. I hope to get the tiller back next week but most likely will have someone till the garden, I'm running out of time with company next weekend and social events, then May should allow some indulgence of gardening and adding some more finishing touches to the house, long overdue.

It's a lot of work, at this stage totally worth it, later who knows?

No matter the shelter, what is more important is if one knows they are loved, and if they love others.

That I wish for everyone.


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Im happy you love your hardwood floors, Demi. Im sure that you installed a high quality of wood flooring, , knowing that going cheap on them would be a mistake.
I want to tear these out and replace them with a higher grade of hardwood flooring as I believe decent quality of wood flooring are so nice, making any house feel like a home - while higher quality of flooring are simply beautiful and really fabulous quality hardwood floors are flat glorious and can become one of the focal parts of any home- as I feel quite certain your's surely are.

I will have to be content with 'nice', though - and most certainly will be - if I can just manage to get my 'big mistake' torn out and replaced! :(


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RE: Pouring,pouring,pouring rain!!!

Attention HGTV:
Please help mr. and mrs. mylab remodel with brand new prefinished wood flooring! Help some folks out there who would really appreciate what some of of the talented people on your network do.
I have all the tools for the job and would offer to help install if I was local. After installing wood floors in my last house my pneumatic floor nailer needs to find another job to do.

This post was edited by heri_cles on Sat, Apr 19, 14 at 8:35


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RE: Pouring,pouring,pouring rain!!!

Mylab,

I'll loan you my pry bar, table saw, miter saw,coping saw, backsaw, draw bar, tapping block and nail gun if that will help.

Count on spending endless hours on your knees. But that's not the hard part, getting up is. :(

No matter the shelter, what is more important is if one knows they are loved, and if they love others.

Happy Easter, Demi.


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RE: Pouring,pouring,pouring rain!!!

"We built this house doing a lot of our own construction ourselves.
This was after saving enough to pay for what you need without
Taking on a mortgage."

This concept is gaining quite the foothold, emerging around the globe more and more often as people both young and old seek to downsize, with regard to debt, economy of square footage, and dependence on current energy sources and other forms of commercialism such as they are.

The reasons are many and include a difficult economy, uncertainty in employment and other areas, an interest in getting back to the basics through subsistence living, moving toward a healthier and more organic or natural lifestyle, re-prioritizing what's important and necessary, etc... and whether the concept includes a little prepping, or leans more toward homesteading, a desire to get 'off the grid', to be more self sufficient, more ecologically aware and involved, carry less or no debt, or any number of other ideas... the need to formulate a plan, pare down, save up, and build or be involved in the building of one's own home without incurring a pile of debt is definitely on the rise.

The trend of home planning and construction today, as it applies to the general idea of remaining debt free includes, but is not limited to, using natural materials available locally or on site, re-purposing and recycling building materials, using the building site's natural elements in such a way as to gain energy efficiency, using less space more efficiently, etc...

People are building earthships, using cob and strawbale construction, earthbag construction, ferro-cement, hemp-crete, rammed earth, log construction, natural stone, erecting yurts, teepees, lodges or mining tents, giant shipping containers, using living green roofs, utilizing roofing as part of a water catchment system, building tree houses, or going with smaller and more nomadic sorts of homes on wheels... or collecting and re-purposing materials, and planning around the acquisition of specifics, such as a found set of windows or doors, etc.

Some are looking to live more independently, more self sufficiently, producing their own energy and food sources, working their own little farmettes. This might include raising livestock, growing and putting up food items, beekeeping, using solar units, wind turbines and/or hydro power from an onsite water source, or heating with a wood stove. It could include an outhouse instead of indoor plumbing, living without electric power... or it could include very well thought out conveniences and satellite tv or wi-fi.

The actual home might be on wheels, or it might be bermed or built into a hill to utilize geothermal properties for more efficient heating and cooling, or it might be built up in the trees taking advantage of positioning for simple enjoyment of a view.

Whatever one's preference, whatever one's skill level or budget, there's a modus vivendi out there waiting to be had!

The link at the bottom contains a plethora of great stories, many like DD's own story of building without creating debt, creative ideas, photos, slide shows, videos, and tons of general information and projects about homesteading, or living a more "back to basics" sort of lifestyle.

This url, directly below, contains an inspiring story about building and living in a "tiny house"... a family trades square footage for a debt free future without sacrificing beauty or functionality. .

http://www.attainable-sustainable.net/building-living-tiny-house/

Tons of links to follow, too... enjoy!

Here is a link that might be useful: Back To Basics... Guts & Imagination!


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RE: Pouring,pouring,pouring rain!!!

In some regions of the country it is the best buying opportunity for young working families in several generations. My sister and her husband recently bought a superb lakeside property with a 1950's home that was a custom-built gem at that time, close to an acre of quite private grounds in a middle-class neighborhood. Although they are pushed close to the max of what they can handle for monthly payments, the place would have been out of their range several times over pre-bubble.

In that region of central florida, if one is willing to live in a neighborhood a notch down from that, in a small house that needs work, you can buy them any day of the week for under 75k.


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We stick-built our home from the ground up, while running a business (DH: 70 hours/week) and working full-time (me). It is a lot of work (and took a year), but to us, it was worth it. No way we would try that again, but 25 years ago, it worked. ;-0

It is very satisfying to love the home that one had a hand or two in creating, whether it's a remodel or from the ground up, big or small.


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I've built two houses for us and one for my daughter.

It's challenging from city hall to occupancy permit.


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RE: Pouring,pouring,pouring rain!!!

No rain - exceptional drought still exists here.


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Heri and Brush, you two are gems - very sweet responses.

It will get done, all in good time. We will probably have them professionally installed though because our friend who assisted and guided DH through the process the first time no longer lives in the state, and like I mentioned before, that sort of thing is not where his gifts are to be found. But wow, do we ever admire those who can actually build their own homes themselves - the savings on the labor would allow for such a nicer house, if one was on a strict budget.
It must provide such a sense of pride, knowing it was done correctly and secure in the knowledge that no skimping on the 'bones' of the house took place - the kind of skimping on improper products used in the construction that people like us could never tell took place.

But mostly, designed exactly the way you want it done.

Congrats to all!


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RE: Pouring,pouring,pouring rain!!!

"No matter the shelter, what is more important is if one knows they are loved, and if they love others.

Happy Easter, Demi."

*

Why thank you, Brushworks--you made my day!

Happy Easter to you, as well, and everyone.


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RE: Pouring,pouring,pouring rain!!!

"But mostly, designed exactly the way you want it done."

Well, I suspect very few get exactly what they want. After we "finished," we realized we wish we had done this and that, and wondered how we could have forgotten about this and that, etc. And one is never, never done. Not really.

But yes, it is very good to know exactly where every wire and pipe and stud is and how old everything is, etc.

I hope Easter is whatever you all want it to be.


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"But mostly, designed exactly the way you want it done."

As Elvis says, maybe not so easy. A disadvantage, even, if one is 26 and cocky, like I was, and did not consult an architect. I got a few things right and a lot wrong.


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Most of my existing structures from mobile homes to very large commercial buildings would be illegal currently due to codes, zoning laws, deed restrictions etc.

Codes, zoning laws, deed restrictions, enforcement and very high property tax rates and heating costs have priced many local residents out of the home market.

That said, there are still many reasonably priced fixer-uppers in regions with very lax codes and/or enforcement.


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I do think that many young people, with jobs more scarce and less reliable long term, coupled with higher costs in construction and lack of stability geographically, many just won't be able to build a home.

Due to poor job security many have to relocate frequently, so they'd rather rent than buy.


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RE: Pouring,pouring,pouring rain!!!

"As Elvis says, maybe not so easy. A disadvantage, even, if one is 26 and cocky, like I was, and did not consult an architect. I got a few things right and a lot wrong."

Too funny, that's exactly how old I was at the time (that we actually had the hole dug). One year later, living here on sub floors...20 years later, finally replaced that bare light bulb waaaay up high with a light fixture. As so it goes. ;-)


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RE: Pouring,pouring,pouring rain!!!

"existing structures from mobile homes to very large commercial buildings would be illegal currently due to codes, zoning laws,"

Industrial activity has it's own local, State, and Federal oversight, depending on scale and what it is. Can't lump that in with residential in the same sentence. IME, when you buy a dwelling you buy the right to dwell there, just like you inherit all other rights, obligations, and liens.


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People working with hands and tools...

I really like to buy things,go thru catalogs,shop,swap,trade
And barter...you don't have to be rich to engage...
My husband has a lathe in his shop. He likes to sit and
Chisel as the lathe turns.He told me it relaxes him.

He has turned some beautiful things for me...a rolling pin
From pecan...pestles of sassafras for small wood kitchen
Mortars...

Mike Miller is a contemporary Muzzleloading gunsmith.
He makes some beautiful guns; the picture I am looking
At is a rifle inspired by an original rifle made in Lancaster
County,Penn around 1770.

The rifle was heavily influenced by English firearms of
1760-1770 period,so it is of course decorative.

People can be so clever and inventive and industrious
In good ways

So why do we get in these destructive messes?

DD


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I see the largest problems in housing opportunities primarily with middle class working class people over 55 years of age. As we all know, many lost equity in their homes, had them foreclosed or had to sell them at a loss. Those who lost jobs or self-employment income following the housing boom and bust also lost credit and the ability to get a mortgage to purchase another home. To complicate matters, reentering the work force was difficult for older workers for a variety of reasons - antiquated skills, the physical limitations of age, the increased cost to an employer to insure older workers, and age discrimination.

So while the young will survive and find housing for themselves I am not as optimistic, at least in a general way, for older Americans. They are the ones who got caught up in the housing bubble, lost jobs and income, and are now faced with tougher financial and life challenges.

Not surprisingly a lot of new construction we see now is from the move-up buyer, middle age couples where very often both have substantial income and want a McMansion of their own.

As far as General contracting a home, it makes little sense for most people, unless, like brushworks, one has the ability and the knowledge to general contract, oversee construction and even to perform some of the finish trades. That is not doable if you are working a full time job or if you do not know what you are doing. Building a decent, well designed, well constructed home is not as easy as some people think it is.


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Speaking of bartering, I generally barter for a lot of second hand stuff and buy a lot of second hand stuff, but the supply is the lowest I've seen in decades.

Seems many have run out of stuff to sell or barter with.


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RE: Pouring,pouring,pouring rain!!!

Heri, I do understand the point you are making. My in-laws and parents are of that generation and I worry about their retirement although both have homes that are paid for (which is basically their retirement funds). But, I still wonder about the challenges my siblings and children will face on the road to home ownership. How much will student loans impede them? The one advantage they have is time, for my siblings with bad credit, they could potentially make things happen with time but wages make it difficult to pay back those student loans and save for a down payment, closing costs, etc.

On a personal level, we took out a mortgage to get our house built. We worked with a designer and people would ask if it was going to be our dream house. I would laugh at that, because I can dream up quite a bit so this house was definitely a reflection of the reality of the time. However, the gardens, we are building over time, harvesting the rock ourselves and that will hopefully be a remarkable work some day.


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I started buying properties with cash and barter when I was a teenager and performed the majority of land development and renovations with no plans, permits or inspections.

Much acreage, many building lots and many residential/commercial structures were dirt cheap, zoning was lax and enforcement was nearly non existent.

I converted the majority of my single family homes to multi-family homes with no permits, plus added the majority of additional units to existing multi-family homes without permits as did the majority of landlords.

Punishment (if you got caught) was a slap on the wrist, or zero if you knew the right people.

Property taxes and heating costs were WAY lower than they are today.

There's no way in hell my daughters can afford modern homes on acreage in the areas they want to live, so I'll help them out.

Back in the mid to late 90s you could still buy decent sized direct lakefront homes in some regions for 100K. The same homes today would sell for 500K plus.

Into the mid 2000s I was still picking up decent tax auction homes for 10K or less. The same homes would sell for 50K plus today.

There weren't nearly as many cash buyers - investors, flippers, landlords and developers snapping up acreage, building lots, tax auction and distressed sale properties only a decade ago.

I was often the only cash buyer bidding on many properties.


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Mark

You were solid.

Risking nobody's assets but your own.

DD


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The only way many are surviving these days is by going outlaw.

They're doing things without plans, permits and inspections, cutting corners left/right/center, hiring cash handymen and cash contractors, working numerous under-the-table jobs, living in dangerous homes, driving dangerous vehicles etc.


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RE: Pouring,pouring,pouring rain!!!

Since this thread is apropos of nothing but has segued to things general regarding structures:

Ya'll simply would not believe how tenacious a wood frame is. I'm no longer worried too much about a hurricane blowing a wood-frame house apart - the real problem is that a strong house can get blown right off it's base. We just destroyed an old cranberry-processing barn - one side of the roof, one wall, and half the second floor were completely collapsed. Everyone said "it'll blow down this winter".

I went to Fl and numerous storms came through here with gusts 50, 60, 70 mph. It wouldn't blow down. Two weeks ago I watched it move around on a windy day. Then we starting cutting. We cut every rafter from the remaining good wall. We cut every floor joist. We cut whatever we could reach from the outside. We jerked the post holding up the floor-girt out with a chain to a truck (maybe going inside to attach the chain wasn't as risky as we thought). Couldn't collapse that building. You could have slept in there after all that and survived. The "web" effect of boards nailed to studs is truly amazing. So we brought the machine and pulled and crunched everything except two walls to be saved.

Thank goodness for giant machines!


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RE: Pouring,pouring,pouring rain!!!

Many of our poorly constructed homes have withstood derecho winds.

It's the tall heavy trees that cause the major damage in these parts.


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