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Food Safety

Posted by marquest z5 PA (My Page) on
Tue, May 29, 12 at 10:56

Is anyone else almost afraid to eat or drink anything?

I keep hearing it is in the safe levels. If we continue to put all these safe levels in our body when do combined safe levels become combined unsafe level and creaate a serious health problem?

-Canned Foods and Juices
Chemical: Bisphenol A (BPA)
-Meat
Chemical: Benzene
Packaged Foods
Chemical: Perfluorinated chemicals
-Aflatoxins are toxins made by the naturally-occurrung fungus Aspergillus and can contaminate peanuts, corn and grains. Affected corn or other grains fed to a dairy cow could mean contaminated milk and milk products.
- Tuna - Radiation
- Apple Juice - Arsenic

Here is a link that might be useful: Chemicals we eat


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Food Safety

Just saw this the other day...

Here is a link that might be useful: 9 nastiest things in your supermarket


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RE: Food Safety

Yes, very afraid. And even more afraid of what my children eat since their bodies are smaller and they have many more years for the cummulative effect.


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RE: Food Safety

I just read an article about labeling tricks, and what the FDA allows food manufacturers to get away with. For example, "all natural" and "organic" can be misleading because the FDA doesn't have strict definitions of what these terms actually mean. "...it's permissible to slap a "natural" label on meat and poultry from animals raised with antibiotics or hormones."

Another trick is serving size... what often looks like a single serving package can actually contain more than one serving, or the single serving size is so small that most people use more, so read carefully.

"Multi-grain" might seem like a good thing, but not when those grains are processed to death and have added chemicals. It's better to look for products containing WHOLE grains.

A lot of products exclaim that they are "good sources of fiber!"... but beware of what that actual source is; many are inferior fiber sources, and can actually be wood pulp, among other interesting things.

Sugar is sugar... many products touting "no high fructose corn syrup" are deceptive because HFCS has close to the same chemical make-up as regular sugar.

Sea Salt... we've been lulled into thinking this is better for us than regular salt, but it's still salt, and it still contains the same amount of sodium. The difference is in the trace minerals of sea salt that give it better flavor.

Omega 3 fatty acids from fish are good for us, but beware the source... many foods contain omega 3's known as alpha-linolenic acid from plant sources such as canola and flaxseed, which are not the same, and are not available in amounts that do any good. The Omegas we get from fish oil are much healthier.

And the list goes on... if anyone is interested, it's from a short article in the Huffington Post. I don't have the link, but I'm sure it's easily accessible.

As to the OP... yes, it scares me that our own government agencies, charged with the job of protecting citizens from harmful substances, are so lenient and have such obscure definitions when it comes to the foods we consume and the chemicals they contain.

In many cases, we don't know whether or not levels of certain things can and/or do build up in our systems causing health issues. For example, we know that plastics used as microwaveable containers are leaching toxins into the foods we're heating... but how much, and what effect are they having? It's a little known fact that many plastics contain a chemical chain that mimics estrogen.

To me, it all seems like a very convenient money making cycle... foods cause health issues, which in turn involve the medical and pharmaceutical industries, which then involves the insurance industry... and everyone makes money from the consumer. And as we all know, the money is in maintaining health issues... not in curing or solving them.


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RE: Food Safety

I find it frightening, and I get very angry when I consider how other countries have long ago banned a lot of the toxins to be found in our foods. It's no wonder that cancer is almost at epidemic levels in America. We are digging our graves with our eating habits and lack of regulations. We have no one to blame but ourselves. It would appear from what I've read, that organic is the only way to go, but as we all know, organic is more costly....


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RE: Food Safety

What really started me in search of info was the fight about the arsenic in the Apple juice. I was forced to read labels and research long ago because my daughter is asthmatic and had food allergies so I had to be very careful of foods and reading labels. But labels do not tell you so many potential dangerous ingredients.

It worries me when I hear politicians say we need to relax regulations. They are saying we have more children now that are diabetic and asthmatic. I think it has a lot to do with what we are feeding out children and ourselves.


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RE: Food Safety

Another thing that needs to be regulated is those high-energy drinks. On the news there was the story of the teen who died when she drank only 2 of those cans. (She had a pre-existing heart valve condition). The doctor interviewed said these high energy drinks certainly should be regulated but the Federal agencies refuse to do so, mostly because these are big business with big lobbyists.
I fear it's the same with our foods, and I don't see it changing in the USA anytime soon. Big money talks and no one seems to care enough to really take this on.


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RE: Food Safety

Jodi: "our own government agencies, charged with the job of protecting citizens from harmful substances"

What? Where is that written? I think WE have that (dare I say it? Why not?) personal responsibility.

That being said, I think Jodi's point is the importance of truth in labeling, and I whole-heartedly agree--we in our family are label readers. And then we try to figure out what it really means...

Jodi again: "To me, it all seems like a very convenient money making cycle... foods cause health issues, which in turn involve the medical and pharmaceutical industries, which then involves the insurance industry... and everyone makes money from the consumer. And as we all know, the money is in maintaining health issues... not in curing or solving them."

Agreed. It's nice to hear something about a conspiracy theory from you, Jodi. I love conspiracy theories. :)


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RE: Food Safety

Think about the folks in the Middle East who have to drink contaminated water, grow food in contaminated soils, and breathe air contaminated by DU weapons dust that the USA deposits there daily.

Our complaints are pathetic and insincere when it comes to the destruction we have caused to the earth's habitat abroad.

Bon Appetit!


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RE: Food Safety

Our complaints are pathetic and insincere when it comes to the destruction we have caused to the earth's habitat abroad.

Brush, your comment is amazing. There are chemicals being injected into the food to make the animals grow faster, bigger, chemicals added to lengthen the shelf life etc.

Are you saying we deserve to have contaminated food because the wars our government start?

You do know we import a lot of our food. Also what we do not import what happens on one end of the world effects the other.
Example Scientists for the first time have found traces of radioactivity in fish off the California coast that migrated from waters off Japan, site of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear reactor disaster last year, the San Francisco Chronicle reports..

So I do not understand your comment. Can you explain why it is pathetic and insincere to be concerned?

Here is a link that might be useful: Import


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RE: Food Safety

This isn't a case of "personal responsibility", the GOP talking point, code for "shut up and let the money roll in I have a vested interest". This is about KNOWN poisons and harmful chemicals and processes that, yes, our FDA is responsible for regulating! Why even have a regulatory agency and regulations to protect consumers if they aren't going to regulate? That IS their job!

Take a close look at the regulations many European countries place on their foodstuffs. They are actually designed to protect the consumer from harmful chemicals and other substances or processes... that OUR country allows. Why? Because of money. Because the largest food and farm and import corporations can afford to lobby hard against regulations and legislation that would cut into their profit margin.

The average consumer is not a chemist, a scientist, an expert in food production and processing... and this is precisely why we HAVE agencies like the FDA, so we can trust that the items being sold for human consumption are actually consumable! We shouldn't have to inspect every label to ensure the product is edible and doesn't contain harmful ingredients... but we do. That says a lot about what trumps what in this country. Profit over people.

Personal responsibility enters the picture when you purchase the products and take them home... in other words, you refrigerate the items that require cold, and you use them by the date indicated on the label, and you prepare the items in a clean environment so as to avoid bacteria, etc... but it's not up to the consumer to ensure that the food companies and growers are doing their jobs... that's why we have regulatory agencies and laws. Hello.


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RE: Food Safety

  • Posted by vgkg 7-Va Tidewater (My Page) on
    Wed, May 30, 12 at 15:08

Did you see in the news yesterday the new and improved ketchup bottle? It has a special coating inside that allows 100% of the ketchup or other condiment to flow out completely. The demo showed the ketchup just sliding out, no residue left at all. The coating is called LiquiGlide.

Here is a link that might be useful: LiquiGlide** safe and effective?


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RE: Food Safety

Marquest,

Do you ever look beyond yourself? Never mind, I'll answer that for you. No.

Bon Appetit!


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RE: Food Safety

And why is the OP being attacked, when she started an interesting thread?


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RE: Food Safety

Attacked? I was only responding to her attack!

Refute my facts then call me in the morning.


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RE: Food Safety

I cannot refute your facts about the Middle East. But Marquest was merely commenting about American need for better knowledge of chemicals/ toxins in our own foods, and the need for regulation.


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RE: Food Safety

I fail to see a difference between the ones who poison your people at home and the ones who poison the people abroad. There is none. Those are one and the same, sharing one and the same motif: Greed.

So what is your point, Michael?


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RE: Food Safety

I fail to see a difference between the ones who poison your people at home and the ones who poison the people abroad. There is none. Those are one and the same, sharing one and the same motif: Greed.

So what is your point, Michael?


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RE: Food Safety

  • Posted by natal Louisiana 8b (My Page) on
    Wed, May 30, 12 at 15:38

Brushworks, are you saying you couldn't care less about the safety of the foods you and your family eat?


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RE: Food Safety

  • Posted by ohiomom 3rdrockfromthesun (My Page) on
    Wed, May 30, 12 at 15:43

Our complaints are pathetic and insincere when it comes to the destruction we have caused to the earth's habitat abroad.

...actually I find that the same people who worry about our food, water, soil, air safety are the same people who oppose wars and YEP they generally belong to the party everyone loves to hate ... dare I say it? Oh why not ... Dems ... :)

Who opposes regulations ? Dems or Reps ... if you answered the second, you get a gold star.

Eat, drink and be merry !


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RE: Food Safety

Brushworks, your answer is funnier than the first response.

It shows you do not understand the topic. There goes that education thing. For you to say I am only thinking of myself I now understand that you do not know........

I will try to do this in snip sound bites.....

Are you aware........evidently NOT!! I will try to explain in that 8th grade level...

When you said "when it comes to the destruction we have caused to the earth's habitat abroad.
If the food is bad abroad it is bad in the entire world. What goes in the air and water is going to effect the world. So the concern can only be solved by the world not just our country. NOT JUST THE UNITED STATES!!!

Do you know what Bon Appetit! means? or Is it something you heard on TV?, lol

Is this to hard for you to understand?

and where did the anger come from I asked you what you meant?


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RE: Food Safety

Elvis when we all become Chemical biologists and have fully equipped labs in our basements then we will become fully responsible for the purity and safety of our own food but in the mean time dont you think it would be more effective and effient for us to pool our resources through some entity like a government and have it done in certified labs? Oh wait-we already did that, but some people think telling businesses they cant leave arsenic in the apple juice( or simply pass off sugar water with artificial flavoring as applejuice) goes against the American Way.

What to do. I can grow my own by I am getting too old to produce enough to live an and with my climate it is not viable anyway..oh well. I'm getting old-the damage is done. I grew up with asbestos in the floor tile of my school and was spritzed with DDT. As for the rest of America I cant work up too much concern for people who habitually live on fast food-mercy-when ever I am forced by circumstances to eat food from one of those places I am struck by the horror of so many doing it every day. That I no longer care about it as much as I used to mean I am becoming more conservative as I age...;) just a little joke there....


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RE: Food Safety

Patricia, I care about food safety plenty! We're highly suspicious about any food we don't have firsthand knowledge of. You might say paranoid, even.

We don't trust the government to see to it that our food supply is safe. It's very nice that there are standards, to be sure; but--we still don't trust them, so we're very careful and hope for the best. (we make our own apple juice from our own apples)


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RE: Food Safety

This is timely...

Here is a link that might be useful: HFC won't be renamed (Yahoo)


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RE: Food Safety

  • Posted by ohiomom 3rdrockfromthesun (My Page) on
    Thu, May 31, 12 at 6:26

...okay I personally do not buy anything that I need a dictionary to look up the ingredients.

Houseful they know there are a lot of people who will not buy products labeled with HFC, otherwise they would not be trying to do an end run.

I buy from a local grocer (who labels country of origin) for produce giving me the option if I want to buy it and at my local farmers market, this year I will be buying from City Fresh also.

I do know since eliminating all wheat products from my diet I feel great.


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RE: Food Safety

I agree, Ohiomom... since detoxifying my own body, I feel a helluva lot better. I've eliminated items with ingredients I can't pronounce, don't know, do know too much about, or are processed in ways that are harmful.

If our own governing agencies aren't going to do it... somebody has to. I must be doing something right, though... I'm forever being mistaken for someone half my age, and told there's no possible way I could have grandchildren. And remember... I'm the one with an inherent disease and so many injuries that my body doesn't always want to cooperate.

I'd agree with the saying "we are what we eat". :-)


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RE: Food Safety

I pretty much don't eat anything out of a box except corn chips with my own salsa, and natural peanut butter with an apple (everyday, to keep the doctor away :) I eliminated wheat from my diet as well and I DO feel so much better.

Wish I could get my husband on board!


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RE: Food Safety

Marquest, that is a good point about food allergies as well. I also have a child with serious food allergies. The rampant uptick in food allergies among children has yet to be explained. I saw one study that linked the use of anti-bacterial products fundamentally changing immune systems but I also personally noticed that the top 7 food allergens are also the very same foods that have the most pesticides.

We spend all this money on homeland security to protect us from threat of terrorist, yet it is our food supply that will kill most of us.


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RE: Food Safety

Related to this is that Mayor Bloomberg of NYC wants a ban placed on large sugary drinks. I'm in favor of this. I try to stay away from all sodas, sweet lattes, southern sweet tea, etc. Many doctors are now saying that sugar is the most toxic thing in our food and drink. It changes our brain waves if too much is consumed. Our bodies are not built to handle the large intakes of sugar, thus more heart disease and obesity, in the USA. I consider it a blessing that I have hypoglycemia. When I discovered this early on, I learned to stay away from sweets, desserts, sugary foods in general. If you read labels, sugar and salt are added to almost EVERYTHING.


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RE: Food Safety

Posted by maggie2094 (My Page) on Thu, May 31, 12 at 8:55

"We spend all this money on homeland security to protect us from threat of terrorist, yet it is our food supply that will kill most of us."

Ain't that the truth? :(



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RE: Food Safety

Hubby is overweight, but still managed (by the skin of his teeth) to get preferred status this year for our new life insurance policy. But it's hard keeping hubby and kids away from the sweets. Everytime he takes them out anywhere, they make a stop at Circle K. His mother was diagnosed with colon-cancer, and, thankfully, she has hit the 5 year mark with no recurrence. You'd think this would scare him enough to change, but it hasn't. I'm afraid of what it may take precipitate a change.


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RE: Food Safety

Woodnymph, I am in favor of that, too...seems Gatoraid is the big thing with kids now and it is just as bad. Cancer feeds on sugar.


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RE: Food Safety

My sister is a naturopath and has been preaching about the cancer/sugar connection for awhile, especially the HFC.

I just saw a picture with a pat of butter and some margarine on a plate. The butter was teaming with ants, but the margarine was untouched. The photo could have been doctored, but it does make a good point.

I will admit that a few times a month I love me some bacon and Italian sausage. I always try to pair them with lots of fruit or veges, but those are my weaknesses!

I'm not in favor of what Bloomberg is doing. More education, yes! Not more government regulations.


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RE: Food Safety

HF: What do you think the implications are in the "ant story" above?

I have my own theories about that, but I'm interested in what others (including you, of course) think.


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RE: Food Safety

Generally speaking, if a food product label has ingredients you can't pronounce, you've never heard of, or too many strange ingredients - Stay Away.


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RE: Food Safety

I would venture to say that all of the posters here are light years ahead of the general public in educating ourselves about food, nutrition, and chemicals and processes associated with our food supply.

It seems that most of us have for years eschewed sugar, chemicals and processed foods and meats. I know that about twenty-three years ago when I discovered from a regular blood test that I had high cholesterol (I weighed 116 pounds, did not eat eggs or meat and exercised--I was shocked) that I became interested in the effect of food on our bodies. Luckily, my children were three and four months at the time and although we ate fairly healthy at the time, I made a concerted effort to cook all fresh, healthy foods and fast food and sodas and such were only treats. I think I bought Chips Ahoy ONE time ever, and my homemade chocolate chip cookies were a treat about once every six weeks or so. Our family isn't fond of sugar, anyway.

I quit using margarine over twenty years ago, only use real butter and olive oil. I got rid of fat free products several years ago and only buy full fat organic milk, buttermilk and cheese, but use it sparingly.

I think it does make a difference; of course genetics play a large part, but I know that for over twenty years I've been eating healthy and exercising and that shows in your skin and muscle tone, at least compared to others of the same age that do not eat healthy or workout. I'm happy to say that I do not take any prescription medications and never have on a regular basis.

I agree about not buying a product if you can't pronounce what's in it (with the exception of a few preservatives).

It's good to know that we are making good lifestyle choices.
Educating others is imperative, but I know for a fact that it sometimes just doesn't matter--people are going to do what they want anyway. Taco Bell calls.

Does this mean we are all going to live longer to argue here? ;)


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RE: Food Safety

demi I think that is what has been lost in our society. The words moderation/sparingly.
I quit using margarine over twenty years ago, only use real butter and olive oil. I got rid of fat free products several years ago and only buy full fat organic milk, buttermilk and cheese, but use it sparingly.

Margarine....Tasted it once and never wanted to taste it again. I remember the first time I tasted margarine was in school in the lunch room. I put it on my bun and could not swallow it. Margarine was never served in my house so I thought everything yellow on a butter dish was butter. lol

I will not eat discount butter either. You can tell it is manufactured to almost taste like butter. I get my butter from the farmer's market and stock up for the winter. I only use a very little. A pound will last me 3 months. That includes what I use for cooking.

My uncle lived on a farm and churned our butter so I can tell the difference.


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RE: Food Safety

I am sensitive to butters vs. margarine, too. If you can find it, Irish butter (KerryGold) is the best, and worth the cost. I think it is what the cows graze on there. French butter is also delicious.

Demi, like you, I really don't have much of a sweet tooth. If I ever want a treat, I will take a little dark chocolate -- but in moderation. I try to get all my sugars from fruits, naturally. Coffee tastes so much richer without the sugar, I learned years ago.


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RE: Food Safety

Elvis, there are two possible answers...

Either ants are dumb, have no culinary taste and don't care about their cholesterol

OR

They instinctively know what real food is!!

I am guessing it's the latter. ;-D


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RE: Food Safety

Great butter site. The French butters are good, but can be very salty.

www.forkandbottle.com/pantry/butter/index.htm

If you have actually seen margarine being manufactured, it would never pass your lips under any circumstances, believe me. Let's just say when they're almost done with it, it is gray.

As Lily said one expects butter to be yellow. So they turn the margarine yellow :-)


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RE: Food Safety

A good way to think about food is whether or not your body know what to do with it - margarine and HFC are good examples.

I have also frequently demonstrated to clients the dichotomy of life and death by putting an apple in one hand and an oreo (or whatever) in the other. I simply say, "Life or Death; you choose!"


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RE: Food Safety

Houseful, great way to give an object lesson to a client, or to anyone. Wish I could do it with my grossly obese friend.

Elvis, the French do make an unsalted butter, you know this already, eh?


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RE: Food Safety

Living in Wisconsin, a dairy state, in my childhood, we had butter. I have a faint recollection of "margerine bans".

I do recall an Aunt in Minnesota, though, with her "gotten from some source" margerine in the 50's. It was a block of white accompanied by a packet of coloring agent packet so you could blend it up to what appeared butter color (depending on your eyesight and kitchen lighting).


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RE: Food Safety

Posted by duluthinbloomz4 zone 4a (My Page) on Thu, May 31, 12 at 15:54

"I have a faint recollection of "margerine bans".

You remember right. My parents smuggled it in from Illinois. It was blackmarket~~

Oleo Wars

Ed Pahule
Milwaukee History Examiner

Imagine, if you will, a world where oleo-margarine is banned. Where only real butter is available and people have to smuggle the substitute substance across the border, avoiding border patrols, and taking back roads in the dead of night.

Is it some sort of Orwellian nightmare? Life in some oppressed communist satellite state? No, this was life in Wisconsin until the late 1960s, albeit with some fictional flourishes. These were the oleo wars and as silly as it may seem today, people then fought margarine as seriously as many fight genetically engineered food today.

Oleo-margarine was invented in 1869 by French scientist Hippolyte M�ge-Mouries. He developed a way to extract an oil from beef fat. He combined this oil with milk, water, and a yellow dye to create a edible substance that resembled butter but was cheaper and stored better than the real thing.

His process was granted a U.S. patent in 1873 and by 1886 there were 37 plants in the United States manufacturing oleo-margarine. Fears soon developed that this product would be fraudulently substituted for real butter.

By 1886, the dairy lobby succeeded in having legislature passed that instituted labeling and packaging restrictions. Taxes were also imposed on margarine manufacturers. Wisconsin went a step further and in 1895 passed laws requiring hotels and restaurants to have clearly posted signs indicating that margarine was sold there.

It was the Great Depression and then World War II that gave oleo-margarine its greatest boosts. The Depression increased sales for the cheaper product and Wisconsin reacted by enacting license fees on margarine manufacturers and increasing the tax on the uncolored margarine to six cents per pound, while colored margarine was banned outright.

WWII, with it's food rationing, introduced margarine to many who had resisted it until then and after the war, as margarine's popularity gained, the government was forced to reconsider it's margarine legislation. In 1950, the federal law taxing colored margarine was repealed. Slowly, over the next decade, states that had instituted their own laws against margarine repealed them until only Wisconsin remained, refusing to change its laws.

In 1957, margarine consumption surpassed butter consumption, yet while others enjoyed their colored margarine and toast, in Wisconsin it was still illegal to use it and Wisconsinites were forced to color their own margarine or cross state lines to buy it. The 15 cent tax on uncolored margarine back in the 1950s was a huge extra expense that many families couldn't bare.

After much debate, including a blind taste test that embarrassed several of the pro-butter contingency, a law was passed on July 1, 1967 making colored margarine legal in Wisconsin for the first time since 1895. The product however, was still taxed until 1973.

Today, only a few laws regarding margarine still remain in Wisconsin, such as butter substitutes are not allowed to be served in state prisons and margarine may not be substituted for butter in restaurants unless requested by the customer.


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RE: Food Safety

  • Posted by ohiomom 3rdrockfromthesun (My Page) on
    Thu, May 31, 12 at 16:48

I do recall an Aunt in Minnesota, though, with her "gotten from some source" margerine in the 50's. It was a block of white accompanied by a packet of coloring agent packet so you could blend it up to what appeared butter color (depending on your eyesight and kitchen lighting).

....DH told me about this, thank gawd daddy only let butter pass his lips. Cannot and will not eat something that can run my car. That said I have learned to enjoy my eggs without using butter ... sigh ... couple handfuls of spinach, one tomato cut up, splash of water and olive oil. When the spinach starts to wilt, crack two eggs over top, cover and poach. Season to taste. It is quite good, and occasionally I will treat myself to a fried egg in butter ... :)


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RE: Food Safety

Thanks, elvis - knew I wasn't dreaming this up.

I use so little butter or margarine on average, I'm just not particular which I buy - unless something specifically asks for one or the other, in maybe baking.

Whatever someone else goes for is fine with me... like if any fish you eat has to be line caught.


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RE: Food Safety

the discussion about butter & margarine got me to thinking, exactly what is wedding cake icing made out of?
It is pure white right? So it is powdered sugar and what? (please don't tell me crisco)


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RE: Food Safety

Yes, there are many frostings that do use Crisco, or a chef-grade version of Crisco. Then they will sometimes add butter for the flavor. But when I've made it with butter, the ratio of powdered sugar to butter was at least 3 to 1, so it looked pretty white.

Unless you attend weddings frequently, I'd say enjoy the cake!


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RE: Food Safety

  • Posted by ohiomom 3rdrockfromthesun (My Page) on
    Thu, May 31, 12 at 21:56

Crisco :)


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RE: Food Safety

My daughter worked in a grocery store bakery one summer while she was in HS and all the icing was made with Crisco.


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RE: Food Safety

"all the icing was made with Crisco."

Shudder. Looks pretty, but maybe that's one reason we don't buy cakes.

We like fruit pies. Our wedding cake, though, was stellar; carrot cake with cream cheese frosting. No Crisco! Man, that was a good cake :-)


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RE: Food Safety

Cancer can be cure. I want to recommend Himalayan Goji berry juice, the most powerful fruit in the world. Tried and tested. "The miracle juice" for more info:

http://www.facebook.com/FreeLifePhilippinesCavite

Here is a link that might be useful: Goji berry juice the miracle juice


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