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Doxy

Posted by haydayhayday none (My Page) on
Fri, May 24, 13 at 13:00

Anyone have any idea what's causing the price to skyrocket?

If you can explain it without using the word, "greed", you get extra points.

I've had Lyme disease three times and, because I'm at Ground Zero for Lyme Disease, (That's Lyme, Connecticut, in case you're wondering about the name.), I like to have a small stash of Doxycycline around as a prophylactic. (If you find a tick on you, you can quickly take one dose of 200 mg, two tablets, and prevent 5 of the 6 possible cases you might have got. Finding a tick on you does not at all mean that you're likely to get Lyme disease.)

So I go to pick up my little stash at Walgreens and was hit by sticker shock.

"Allina Health pharmacies have seen the price of a 500-count bottle of 100 milligram doxycycline shoot up by nearly 1,000 percent,"

Whoa......

What's going on?

""If you look at what they've told the FDA, it's basically a non-explanation explanation," he said. "I don't think anybody knows why it's actually in short supply. That doesn't mean necessarily that it's something nefarious, but I wish we had a better explanation of what's going on."

Me, too.

Hay


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Doxy

This is what I found!

Here is a link that might be useful: Shortage


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RE: Doxy

Could this be the reason?

"May 16 (Reuters) - Hikma Pharmaceuticals Plc raised its full-year revenue forecast as its generic antibiotic doxycycline generated revenue ahead of its expectations, sending its shares up as much as 5 percent.

The company, founded in 1978 in Jordan, has been able to take advantage of a drug shortage in the United States as several generic drugmakers have been forced to cut capacity in the face of stringent regulatory scrutiny.

Hikma said it expected group revenue to rise about 13 percent in 2013, up from its previous forecast of around 10 percent.

The company reported revenue of $1.11 billion in 2012, with its generic business contributing $103.7 million and injectables contributing $470 million.

Hikma said it continued to expect its largest injectables business to achieve low double-digit revenue growth.

"The significant contribution from doxycycline in the first half of 2013 is enabling us to cover the increased cost of remediation in our generics business," Chief Executive Said Darwazah said.

The drugmaker stopped commercial production at its Eatontown, New Jersey plant in November to ensure compliance with U.S. FDA guidelines."

I hope the FDA has carefully weighed the consequences if this is the case. Long term infection with Lyme Disease and all the other terrible diseases for which this is the drug of choice is not something I'd want to go through.

Hay


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RE: Doxy

For what it's worth, I needed tetracycline 2 months ago and could only get monocycline. There is indeed a shortage of these drugs, and they aren't the only ones.

It does remind me of my days in Eastern Europe, when you just took what you could get.

I don't know if it's the drug manufacturers fighting back against the perceived profit losses imposed by the Affordable Healthcare Act, or something entirely different, or a mixture of both. It does seem in many (not all) cases to be impacting the cheapest non-patented drugs, like thyroid, penicillins, etc.

Anyone know any actual facts?

Here is a link that might be useful: FDA: current drug shortages


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RE: Doxy

We cross posted, Labrea.

I'd seen this kind of talk.

"Shortage", "Supply and Demand".....doesn't really answer the Why?

Hay


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RE: Doxy

Ah, I just saw the other responses to the OP. Interesting.

I take thyroid and can tell you that the variation in potency previously allowed to generics by the FDA was killer, absolutely unacceptable. My thyroid levels went all over the place every time my insurance tried to switch me to generic, to the point where my doctor was calling them himself to insist that I take the branded version.

So - if the newer regulations are forcing generics to more stringently abide by guidelines, I can't fault them for it, based on personal experience.

Of course, this is just more grist for the mill of price gouging by the branded corps.

Is there no honest man left in the healthcare industry?


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RE: Doxy

There was a recent thread on generic pharmaceutical companies having, um, issues.....

"A subsidiary of India's largest pharmaceutical company has agreed to pay $500 million in fines and civil penalties for selling adulterated drugs and lying about tests of the medications to federal regulators, the U.S. Justice Department said Monday.
Prosecutors said the guilty plea by Ranbaxy USA Inc. represents the largest financial penalty by a generic drug company for violations of the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act, which prohibits the sale of impure drugs.

The subsidiary of Ranbaxy Laboratories Limited admitted that it made and sold impure drugs at two manufacturing sites in India. The batches of adulterated drugs, whose strength, purity or quality differed from the specifications, included generic versions of an antibiotic and other medications used to treat severe acne, epilepsy and nerve pain, prosecutors said."

So maybe, all this time you were buying generic oxycycline, it maybe had some impurities or half the dose or one of those little quibbles. Which is why the company is shutting down the factory to comply with those silly, job killing regulations.

Here is a link that might be useful: link to thread


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RE: Doxy

Plus... it's tick season? Would that have any effect on the price rise?


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RE: Doxy

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Fri, May 24, 13 at 14:57

Tick season apparently had no effect on the desire to blame government oversight for decisions made by corporations.


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RE: Doxy

I don't have any more time today to look into this, but I suspect that Dave's Ranbaxy article could be a big part of what's going on.

The CDC said,

"Doxycycline Shortage
Updated: 1/18/2013
According to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) there is a national shortage of doxycycline because of manufacturing issues and an increased demand for the drug due to shortages of other drugs."

That's about as clear a statement I can find about the problem. Not very clear, I know. "Manufacturing issues", I like that term.

From the Economic Times,

"PTI Jun 2, 2006, 02.25pm IST

MUMBAI: Ranbaxy Laboratories Ltd has received approval from USFDA for manufacturing and marketing Doxycycline Tablets in the US market.The company informed the Bombay Stock Exchange that it got the approval for marketing the antibiotic in strengths of 50mg, 75mg and 100mg.Doxycycline is indicated for a variety of infections caused by susceptible strains or micro-organisms including respiratory tract and urinary tract infections, skin and skin structure infections, it added.The USFDA's office of generic drugs, has determined the company's formulations to be bioequivalent and having the same therapeutic effect as that of the branded drug Adoxa, marketed by Bioglan Pharmaceutical Co, Ranbaxy added."

From Consumer Reports,

"The shortage, which is due to increased demand and manufacturing delays, comes at a particularly bad time, because there's still an ongoing shortage of tetracycline, a member of the same drug class and an alternative to doxycycline. So people who need either drug have reduced options."

From somewhere,

I need to get ready to go out. Hope all of you have as much fun as I I will dancing around here tonight. If any wild women invite me to go home with them, I'm going to pass until I'm sure there's plenty of antibiotics around.

Hay


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RE: Doxy

"Plus... it's tick season? Would that have any effect on the price rise?"

The run up in price has been going on since at least December of last year. I really doubt that tis-the-season has anything at all to do with it.

And I'd suspect that Lyme Disease is a very small part of the overall usage of this drug or any antibiotics in any case.

I could be wrong about that. As always.

Hay


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RE: Doxy

Hay, something you might be interested in. The symptoms of low-level CIDP are very similar to those of Lyme disease, and several people have been mis-diagnosed, both ways.

It turns out that there is a herbal extract from Peru used to treat Lyme disease called "Samento", and a few years back, the CIDP internet group I belong to went through some self-medicating trials with this drug to see if it helped anyone - some it did, many it didn't. I tried it - found that it would knock any flu or cold out within 24 hours, and everyone in the '52 household is now a devotee.

Anyway, google up "Samento Lyme Disease".


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RE: Doxy

I will later, Dave. Thanks.

I'm rushing but I just wanted to congratulate Jodi for typing a whole sentence without using the word, "greed". As I was getting ready to go out, I had this image of Jodi, biting her tongue biting her fingers, as she's typing away. Good for you, Jodi!!!

And I'm going to be reporting bboy to the Thread Derailment Vigilante Committee.

Out of here.

Hay


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RE: Doxy

  • Posted by vgkg 7-Va Tidewater (My Page) on
    Fri, May 24, 13 at 18:08

Hay & David, did you guys (or anyone else here for that matter) develope the bulls-eye inflamation surrounding the tick bite? I've never had Lyme but have had several ticks this year. No bulls-eyes on me so far. Was eaten up with ticks camping with parents in my toddler+ years, not a bubble boy so maybe have some immunity? Spelling extra terrible today...


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RE: Doxy

Not that I remember, vgkg.

Of course, I'm dealing with the higher class, more sophisticated Rocky Mountain tick that sips, delicately with raised pinky, on prime elk blood, not the plebeian East Coast variety - who knows where it was drinking last night - maybe those mangy white tails - or some squirrel....


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RE: Doxy

"Of course, I'm dealing with the higher class, more sophisticated Rocky Mountain tick..."

Can't you get Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever from those ticks?


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RE: Doxy

lol Dave!

Vgkg, I contracted Lyme when I lived just over the border from Lyme, CT; I had the classic tick bite bullseye rash, though I didn't know what it was and didn't seek treatment until 2 years later when symptoms got more extreme.

This post was edited by circuspeanut on Sat, May 25, 13 at 2:12


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RE: Doxy

My eldest son contracted Lyme disease while working for a tree cutting outfit many years ago, and the symptoms do, indeed, begin with a reddish looking bullseye around the tick bite or wound, yes...

He went to the doctor as soon as he noticed it, but the antibiotics were administered a bit too late, and he does suffer from the aggravations of the disease.

Living rurally, as we do, we are very careful to check each other for ticks after having been working outside. We have larger ticks, and then those really small deer ticks.

We use one of two of the popular brands of preventatives sold at most farm type stores for the dogs... Spot On, I believe it's called. It's an orange smelling liquid that is placed on the back of the neck, and it prevents ticks and fleas from infesting the animals.

Now is also the time for heart worm and other parasite infestations in pets, so be sure to use a preventative if you have pets.

Coccidea and giardia are also possibilities this time of year, birds being the most common carriers of protozoan stomach parasites such as coccidea. So, if you keep an outside water or food supply for your pets, a preventative may be in order. We use Corid, but there are others available.

Hay, I don't have to bite my tongue or nails... we all know how the world really works. Those who deny it are only lying to themselves... not to me.

Great... now I've got the "creepy crawlies" thinking about ticks and fleas and other insects! ;-)


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RE: Doxy

Jodi, I'm still proud of you for not using the word, "greed", in a sentence.

You still get extra points for that.

Dave, I checked out Samento and I think it's interesting. I don't have any unresolved illness so I won't be seeking it out, but it's all very interesting.

I've had Lyme three times, spread over about 20 years. The thing that really tipped me off that I had it the first two times was that I'd get up at 8 AM and by 10 AM, I felt like I needed to go back to bed. The second time I also had a really stiff neck to go with it.

The third time, in the past couple of years or so, the ONLY symptom was a peculiar looking rash, not the classic red bull's eye at all, but more blistery looking. If I'd had an active sex life, I'd have thought it could be something terrible that I'd picked up, but, unfortunately, I could rule that out right away. I wasn't feeling terrible, but the Doc took one look at it and declared it to be "typical" Lyme Disease Rash.

I can't remember now if I found a rash at all the second time. Maybe that episode was just the stiff neck, the tiredness, the season and knowing that I was always gardening that convinced the Doc that I had Lyme.

But, the first time, I felt awful and found a little redness area in the crease between my thigh and my torso. No bigger than a quarter, not very red at all. I went to a Doc in NYC and I think he took blood for tests which I think came back negative, (I think that was commonly the case in too-early diagnosis back then). He declared that I did not have Lyme.

Two or three days later, my body was COVERED with red rashes. I had redness as big as a plate across my back that blended into other plate size rashes. Yes, indeed. I'm aware at the time that a local hospital was looking for Lyme Disease volunteers for research and went there right away. They take a plug from my skin, culture it and find that there's no doubt about my having Lyme.

I've gotten a lot better about managing my exposure and checking myself.

In a bad year, I may find 15 or so ticks embedded in me. It's generally thought that it takes at least 24 hours before an attached tick will release the spirochete into you. I catch most of the ticks before that, I suspect.

A good thing to know, I think, is that, rather than try to grab one with your stubby tweezers, squeezing the spirochete into your body, you can simply shave them off with a Bic shaver. You don't need to be concerned that you're leaving the "head" of the tick still embedded in you. Swab it with alcohol.

Which is just what I did when I found a teeny, tiny tick on my chest a couple of days ago, my first of the season.

That redness, just below the little mole is the result. You can see that there's no hair there because I shaved it all off. It was a very, very tiny tick. Getting it with tweezers would have been impossible. Could it have been the first stage, the larvae stage which doesn't carry the disease? They're not born with it, but pick it up when they feed, typically on a certain species of mice in their molting to the second nymph stage.

That redness is about the size of a pencil eraser head. I'm focused on that to show you that a redness at a tick bite, one that occurs within a couple of days, is not the classic bull's eye redness that you'll get with Lyme Disease. Instead, it's apparently just a local reaction that I get to the tick itself. I get it every time I get a tick on me. It's small and itchy. I say this to a lot of people who will ask me about that when they, themselves, find and remove a tick and notice a redness in the next couple of days.

It's those middle-sized (second to smallest) nymphs that will get you. The larvae don't carry it and it's hard to miss those bigger adults. The big ones are nasty creatures when they embed themselves into you.

I'm creepy, crawly like Jodi, now.

Hay


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RE: Doxy

We don't operate on a points system, Hay, and don't usually keep score for later retribution, or anything... so, thanks for the award, but if it's all the same... I'm okay without it.

Oh, and by the way... I just thought of something... avarice. It must have something to do with avarice! ;-)

There... I have redeemed my former ranking. And somehow, I've contracted a much more creepy crawly feeling. I think I need to go check my back for ticks! Those teeny tiny ones wouldn't even be noticeable to the naked eye! Ewwwww!


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RE: Doxy

Yep, outer circle diameter about half a foot across, inner circle a little under three inches. It didn't appear until I was soaking in a nice warm tub after doing a lot of yard work. I think I removed half a dozen ticks that day and the little ones didn't get caught until I was in the tub. When I showed it to the Doctor he surprised me by trying to say it wasn't Lyme. I guess he got the message I wasn't convinced because he changed his mind when I turned around and said " I beg your pardon?" Didn't know I was so scary. Truthfully, I really thought I hadn't heard him right but I guess he was trying to get out of reporting it for some reason. After I got the prescription I refused to see him again when he was covering for my regular Doctor. The blood test came back positive, by the way.

Just for my own information, how do you get a bottle of 100 tablets of ANY antibiotic?


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RE: Doxy

Yep, outer circle diameter about half a foot across, inner circle a little under three inches. It didn't appear until I was soaking in a nice warm tub after doing a lot of yard work. I think I removed half a dozen ticks that day and the little ones didn't get caught until I was in the tub. When I showed it to the Doctor he surprised me by trying to say it wasn't Lyme. I guess he got the message I wasn't convinced because he changed his mind when I turned around and said " I beg your pardon?" Didn't know I was so scary. Truthfully, I really thought I hadn't heard him right but I guess he was trying to get out of reporting it for some reason. After I got the prescription I refused to see him again when he was covering for my regular Doctor. The blood test came back positive, by the way.

Just for my own information, how do you get a bottle of 100 tablets of ANY antibiotic?


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RE: Doxy

We ask our doctor when we require antibiotics for any infection or other issue that would require their use, and he writes a prescription for the correct type and dose.

I don't believe there's any other way to obtain antibiotics... unless one knows someone who could obtain them in large amounts... I dunno... although, antibiotics are nothing to fool around with, and it's very important to use the right one for the issue at hand, and complete the course of usage as directed, even if the problem or infection appears to clear up right away.

The over usage or misuse of antibiotics is seldom talked about, but it's really an important issue... especially as it pertains to children and over using them for every little thing.


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RE: Doxy

How to get lots of antibiotics w/o a doctor.

Pretend you're a hog or chicken farmer.

I used to get salesmen trying to sell me 100 lb sacks of the stuff....

Here is a link that might be useful: like here, for example


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RE: Doxy

It's true that many medicines manufactured for human use are the same or very similar to many packaged for animals... but one really needs to know their medicines and what can be harmful, etc...

The farm industry used to market an injectable, full spectrum antibiotic called Combiotic that every pet owner or farmer I know used to use, but it was pulled from shelves years ago. It could successfully be utilized for both humans and animals. I don't know if that's why it's no longer sold, because it was cutting into the medical industry's profits and people weren't seeking doctors for infections and whatnot... but it's one theory. I've never really looked into it.

I wouldn't recommend human use of animal antibiotics today unless one knows exactly what one is doing...


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RE: Doxy

We now have Lyme Disease out here in So.Cal.; thank you, Ea.USA. I rarely get tick bites but may catch upwards of 5 or 6 in the evening following some brush work. We try to keep the weeds down around field margins so as to reduce the little effers. Some of my workers seem more proned to tick bites than others. Something to do with body chemistry?

I hired on a young MI farmer passing through. He has had Lyme Disease for two years and treats it with diet and herbals. He's a demon for work but will literally fall apart when the condition kicks in and he has to lie down. Now I'm worried that he will infect local ticks and they will go on to spread Lyme Disease more widely.!!! Is that possible?


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RE: Doxy

Marshall - as I understand it, vector-borne organisms like Lyme spirochetes require the entire cycle of deer - tick - human. It doesn't go the other direction, does it?


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RE: Doxy

Ewwww. I am getting itchy just reading this. I need to check the dogs as we walked in the woods and meadows today.I can honestly say I have never found a tick on either dog. They get Sentinel and Frontline every month. A few years ago I was on the computer and scratched my upper back. It felt like a mole and I thought ...skin cancer!!! Yikes ,my sunbathing years have caught up to me. But it was a small tick got in my backyard. My daughter came over the next day and cut it out. My doctor ordered one Doxy tablet to be safe.

My question: When did Lyme disease start? Being a vigilant parent, my big worry when my kids were growing up was Rockey Mountain Spotted fever. Now you rarely hear of that...just Lyme which I never heard of back then. We lived in the country then and my daughter was picking flowers near the lake when she did a blood piercing scream. I raced over and there was a tick crawling up her pants. She kinda overreacted because I had them nuts checking for ticks all the time.


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RE: Doxy

"Just for my own information, how do you get a bottle of 100 tablets of ANY antibiotic?"

Easy. Next time you're in Mexico, just walk into a farmacia and ask for it.


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RE: Doxy

sleeplessinftwayne, I've read a whole lot about Lyme disease over the years, I've gone to lots of local presentations from the experts and every thing I'm saying is coming from that experience. I don't know any thing for sure.

But, I really doubt that the classic bull's eye reaction would be showing up from a tick you picked up this morning that you find this afternoon. I think the timing is more on the week side, not the hour side. I could be wrong, of course.

Maybe you had the classic bull's eye and it was from a tick bite from several day's ago? Maybe you saw the little local redness like I get? Maybe this, maybe that?

In the early days, especially, but even now, the medical people, including the researchers I was in contact with at the Lyme Volunteer program I ran with for several years, say that there's a lot of misinformation about Lyme out there.

An example of that is the attribution of so many unexplained long term illness to "long term Lyme Disease". Not that it doesn't happen but not all long-term illness is "long term Lyme". One researcher was telling me that there's a lot of misinformed thought that you could have recurring bouts of Lyme Disease, arising from one infection.

But, he said they've done some testing and found that, by culturing and looking closely at the DNA, people were actually becoming repeatedly infected with different strains.

Marshall:

"Now I'm worried that he will infect local ticks and they will go on to spread Lyme Disease more widely.!!! Is that possible?"

Circuspeanut:

"Marshall - as I understand it, vector-borne organisms like Lyme spirochetes require the entire cycle of deer - tick - human. It doesn't go the other direction, does it?"

I don't know the direct answer to your question.

When I was looking at some sites about Dave's Samento, I came across one article, and who knows if it's part of the hysteria or part of the truth, that was flat out saying that they'd found the spirochete in just about every part of the body. I'm not going to track it down, but I remember particularly: semen. Tears, saliva, breast milk, babies born with it.....Again, hysteria or truth? Just so many things I can check out.

The last I knew about the life cycle is like I've suggested. The tick is not born with it. They will pick it up, typically, from a particular mouse that hosts the disease, in the first of three feedings over their life. I suspect it's just the smallness of the larvae that causes it to go after the small mouse. The next feeding can be a larger creature like the deer. Deer, I don't think are the typical, if at all, carriers of the disease. They do a lot to spread it around.

Lily:

"My question: When did Lyme disease start? Being a vigilant parent, my big worry when my kids were growing up was Rockey Mountain Spotted fever...."

Again, I could be wrong about any of what I say, but I think I've seen research to suggest that it's been around for a very long time, but it was only after the outbreak in Lyme, Connecticut and some sleuthing by some diligent moms that put us on the trail of discovering what was going on.

I THINK I can remember that some tests have shown that most of the population in SOME places around New England have evidence of having been exposed to Lyme.

I have this vague memory about reading that some old discovery of a frozen body or something like that showed that hundreds or thousands of years ago it existed in Europe. I'm vague on this, but I do have the impression from my readings over the years that it's not a new disease at all.

There's a LOT of diseases spread by ticks. I don't have the time to track it down for you, but I mean LOTS. That's one of the reasons for Doxy being the drug of choice for Lyme. It takes care of Lyme AND some of the other terrible things that you may have picked up from the tick, too.

Hay


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RE: Doxy

There are many carriers and spreaders of various diseases and parasites... insects, rodents, birds, large and small mammals...

My husband jokes that we handle so many different types of wormers and whatnot for the various animals we care for, we're probably worming ourselves at the same time, just through skin contact with the substances!

But on a more serious note... it's the poisons used to control the insects, rodents, and other pests that are carriers of diseases and parasites that we should be especially careful with... if we handle them.


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RE: Doxy

That's a great tip about using a razor to remove the tick. I like to go into wild natural areas, and get bitten by deer ticks about 3-6 times each year. I usually find the tick early because the tick bite gets itchy, so I feel it before seeing it. After removing the tick I clean with alcohol and then put on some Bactroban (topical antibiotic) for a few days. I have a stash of Doxy but rarely have to use it.

This year and last year the tick population seems to be down around here. Could be because of the lack of snow cover for part or most of the winter. Just removed a deer tick from around the cat's eye this morning but that's the first one I've seen this year so far.


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RE: Doxy

I have no doubt the classic bullseye I had came from a bite I got before that day, I was just remarking on the number that were there when the bullseye appeared. Even then most of those ticks had not bitten me...yet? I am also fairly sure the bullseye became more apparent because of the hot bath. The blood tests are the proof in any case and those were positive.

I started appropriate antibiotics for the appropriate time and feel fortunate the effects were not serious since I was already dealing with extremely severe Fibromyalgia at the time. I don't know if it is still a reportable disease but at the time, it had to be reported to the state and tracked. It was quite new to the area at that time.That was why I was annoyed the doctor was reluctant to even draw the blood for the tests. Quite a few people in that area had more severe reactions and no one was sure what to expect.


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RE: Doxy

Yes, Hay, thanks for the tip about the razor, I hadn't heard that.

I live in the heart of Lyme's disease territory. It is rare to meet someone who hasn't taken antibiotics for it at one time or another. I also know many people who believe they have "chronic" lyme's and my suspicion is that Lyme's gets the blame for other conditions.

I aslo agree with the observation that tick populations are down this year. As well as pollinators. Possible connection?


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RE: Doxy

We've seen a rise in tick populations this year, and I think the pollinators are okay... our apple tree was positively abuzz with life while in bloom earlier, and there are insects galore buzzing about the gardens, though I'm not seeing the toad population we usually see.

We have seen an animal not usually seen, or not often seen anymore around here, though... I believe it was a cougar. We've heard and seen large cats in the area lately.

We keep all sorts of medicines and preventatives handy... one needs to when one deals with livestock or other animals, and lives where a doctor is not right around the corner.


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RE: Doxy

Oh, and I do get check for Lyme periodically because of the many bites. I've had 2 Lyme titres in the past 3 years and they've both been negative. If you work in or like to wander in brushy or meadow areas in Lyme country you have to be diligent about monitoring and treating for ticks! Also I have to check the cats face and neck on a regular basis.

I am seeing a decent variety of pollinators. Early in the season there are always fewer than mid-late season. I think they get "born" or "hatched" throughout the summer or what ever you call it for baby bees!

My Cornus alternifolia (alternate leaf dogwoods) are in full bloom right now. They were purchased as small seedlings and they are finally maturing and have many blooms. I've enjoyed watching it because it turns out all manner of pollinators love this plant!


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RE: Doxy

OMG stop it - you are terrifying me.
Relocating to a woodland is a major anxiety for this unrestrained townie (I have never lived further than 100 yards from some little foreign grocery store throughout my entire life - even the suburbs was akin to some urban no-go jungle). The first night in the woods gave me a major wig-out (like I was going to be attacked by a gigantic owl or something) and even worse, the second night, I was distracted by the sounds of (gulp) gunshot and a torch passing over the nearby fields. Well, I have done a bit of lamping in the days when I had lurchers) so was not yet that worried, but when the lamp appeared to be focused exactly on me, as I sat, quivering in the horse-box, I started to get a bit agitated. Bear in mind that Norfolk is absolutely the boondocks, a sort of UK appalachia with many gun-toting hill-billy types. So yep, I seriously thought I was going to experience a 'Deliverance' moment at the hands (hands?) of crazed fenland loons, probably wanting to bugger Mr Camps and I with an ancient farm implement (Yeah, the imagination goes into overdrive - must be the adrenalin rush).
Since the hogweed is now chest high, throughout the entire wood, I am accompanied by a vicious machete/hurling stick thing I lovingly crafted myself (and sharpened to a savage edge on my old bench grinder).
Suffice to say that this whole woodland lark is likely to prove a massively steep and precipitous learning curve.
Have already spotted several horrid 'vampire deer' - absolutely nothing at all like Bambi - these little horrors have....tusks? and I almost lost my teeth when a belligerent cock-pheasant appeared (and crowed) mere inches from my innocently turned back. Grief - my usual experiences of country life tend to be enjoyed through the windows of a fast car (with them firmly closed since everything either bites or stings).


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RE: Doxy

Do not fear, Campanula... deer do not have tusks, and most wildlife is more afraid of you, than you of it. Owls do not attack... not that I've ever heard of... and deer have antlers. In some places, it is illegal to "shine" at night for the purposes of hunting... though I cannot say what your laws are, or what your wildlife consists of. I can't imagine it's more dangerous than many animals we have, here, in the US.

It's been my experience that most country folk are very nice, welcoming, and generous... though I do suppose every area has its strange folk, too.

I enjoy the solitude, the wildlife, the cleaner air, etc... and could not deal with the constant noise, pollution, or fast pace of city life.

Spent about a year once, living in Chicago... and while it was handy to have some things so close, it was also very... it seemed to constantly press in on me. I was born a country person, and will always prefer the wide open spaces and the wildlife. Last night, after the rains finally passed, the night was positively alive with toads, night birds, crickets... a veritable lullaby. :-)

Now that I've really heard them for the year, I think our toad population might be okay.


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RE: Doxy

They DO have tusks....or whopping great teeth or summat.

Muntjacs and Chinese water deer - horrid nasty things.


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RE: Doxy

I guess I'm just so used to our deer, which are strictly ruminants and not necessarily prone to attacking! :-)

By comparison, it would seem that the Muntjac and the Chinese Water Deer are much smaller in stature and size, though I haven't read anything about the use of tusks on humans. It appears to be a weapon common to the bucks, and used against one another in mating or territorial battles. Very interesting creatures, really... at first sight, or from a distance, I might even mistake one for our larger coydogs.

They appear much smaller than what roams the northern and northwestern... or even the northeastern... areas of our nation, or what roams over the border in Canada, I can tell you!

I suppose each area has its own set of rather scary, or scary looking, animals... some I don't think I'd be quite prepared to meet in person... but one can learn to co-exist with and appreciate them, even, the longer one is surrounded by them.


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RE: Doxy

"I suppose each area has its own set of rather scary, or scary looking, animals... some I don't think I'd be quite prepared to meet in person... but one can learn to co-exist with and appreciate them, even, the longer one is surrounded by them."

I can attest to that. One even gets used to the Hodag. See the Hodag at the link.

Here is a link that might be useful: Hodag


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RE: Doxy

I picked up the shave-it-off trick from an MD who was a part of a local presentation from the experts on Lyme. He, himself, used a scalpel.

I remember, now, another way that I've discovered. I've used a quality pair of fingernail clippers. They work pretty well. I'm not trying with the clippers to snip the tick off as I am with the razor, but if that happens, it's OK with me. In this case, I'm trying to get between the body and the embedded part and gently, slowly pull the tick and it's mouthpiece out of my body.

I also have a quality pair of needle-nose tweezers somewhere around here that I need to find. Sometimes they work for me, sometimes they don't. The razor is always reliable, but I'd rather not leave anything behind if I can avoid it. Living alone means that tweezers don't work so well on my back where I can't even reach. In that case, I've taped a Bic razor to a foot long ruler and managed to shave it off.

This site suggests an X-Acto knife, essentially a scalpel-like hobby tool.

What you don't want to do is try torturing the tick to come out on its own. No alcohol, no soap, no oils, no cigarettes, no, no, no.

If you want more thoughts on that, check out Judith's comments on this thread, a thread that starts out with the suggestion to torture the tick out with a soap saturated cotton ball.

"Please read my posts here. Making the tick detach itself is dangerous. In the process of detaching, it has to dissolve the cement it used to attach its mouthparts in the wound and seal the wound up. In dissolving the cement, it is going to regurgitate some of its gut contents into the wound. Unless the tick has already been feeding for several hours, the disease germs are still down in the gut and haven’t been injected into your body yet. But if the tick pukes, it is going to inject disease germs along with some gut contents,.....

Proven methods to reduce the likelihood of Lyme Disease that I use.

1) Shower as soon as you come inside from working outside.

2)Which means, shed your work clothes right away. I have a clothes line that starts at my entry door and I will strip naked and hang my clothes on the line before I head in for the shower.

I think I've said just about everything I think I know.

This thread is now available for Derailment. Have fun.

Hay


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RE: Doxy

You're all going to start thinking I'm an exhibitionist.

Guess who, according to the Western Blot Test (sp?), which according to my physician, is pretty reliable, has Lyme Disease?

I've been feeling a LITTLE lethargic. I've been having a LITTLE bit of a sore throat. I've been having a LITTLE bit of a stiff neck. My thinking has been a LITTLE more foggy. NONE of which would, in itself, suggest anything other than old age creeping up on me.

And then I got this little rash. It's on my thigh and my hand is there for the scale. No bull's eye.

I took the picture when I first saw it because it was last Friday, almost two weeks ago, and I wouldn't be able to see my new physician until the next Wednesday and I wanted to be sure he saw it. It was very much like the rash I observed in my first go with Lyme.

By Wednesday, even the day after, the rash pretty much had disappeared and the physician didn't seem to think it was symptomatic of anything. Off to the lab.

I've now had Lyme three or four times and maybe Erlichiosis once.

I made a run to the dump yesterday and the attendant and I were comparing notes. He just went through the Doxy treatment routine for the 3rd, or 4th or 5th time . He's lost count.

Hay


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RE: Doxy

So now's your chance to check out Samento, Hay. I get mine from this place -

Here is a link that might be useful: link to shoppe where they sell the stuff


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RE: Doxy

I appreciate the idea, Dave, but I think I'll stick with the proven Doxy.

Plus, I like the idea of being slightly nauseous for the next 21 days.

The dump attendant was looking really trim and said he really hadn't eaten for 21 days. I could lose a little weight and still look good in my tight fitting jeans.

Last night I took some pictures of my chest which had a very slight rashy looking area about as big as a plate, but it shows up only slightly in the picture and I'm afraid that you all might not be able to control yourselves if I showed you more of my lovely body. The rashy look is not there any more. Weird stuff, this Lyme.

Hay


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RE: Doxy

Hay, I think you should move away from there. Or quit going outside.

I think I might start using skin so soft in my laundry rinse water now. It is 100% effective against mosquitos for me - and probably ticks since I've never had one. I use the SSS body wash and body oil. I use the body wash for shampoo if I'm going to be out in the woods.

By the way, what pretty hands you have hay.


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RE: Doxy

  • Posted by vgkg 7-Va Tidewater (My Page) on
    Wed, Jun 19, 13 at 16:58

Good luck with a speedy recovery Hay, hope that you can still down some brews.


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RE: Doxy

Well good thing you are staying on top of your testing and treatment Hayday!

I have used your technique and shaved off no less than 4 deer tick nymphs from my body in the last THREE days, and even more than that off the cat's face in the past couple weeks. They are prolific right now!

These nymphs are so tiny, they are nearly impossible to see. I measured and photographed one of them, they are less than 1 millimeter in diameter. Luckily, they cause me to itch almost immediately upon attaching, otherwise I don't know if I would have found them.


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RE: Doxy

"They are prolific right now!"

I don't have the time to track down the numbers, but I think that right about now, the month of June, in our area, is about the peak for nymph activity and Lyme infection. I'm always particularly alert this time of year.

"I'm not a physician, I don't play one on TV...."

Be aware of that.

"Guess who, according to the Western Blot Test (sp?), which according to my physician, is pretty reliable, has Lyme Disease?"

Or maybe not so reliable? I'll spare you most of the details, but it's not at all clear, now that I've seen the lab reports, had another conversation with the doc and another friend in the field, that the tests said that I had Lyme.

I still think there's a very good chance, most likely I think, that I do have Lyme disease and I'm taking Doxy.

What I really want to do in this post is to say that the best "test" for whether you have Lyme is probably the "clinical" test: Do you feel lousy, have a mild sore throat, lethargic, stiff neck, garden in leaf litter for 5 hours a day every day at ground zero for Lyme Disease with a peculiar rash and have been pulling ticks off you for the past month? You should maybe take Doxy. And if the lab tests, both Elissa and Western Blot say you don't have antibodies? Still, take the Doxy. That seems to be the medical opinion I've heard from several physicians over the 20 years of my life with Lyme.

And if you still have an interest.....

I've spent several days searching on the internet about Lyme Disease. (Which means, of course, that I'm more confused than when I started.)

But with regard to the tests and I have no idea if the site is worthless or not, but I've seen similar things said on other sites,. (Remember:"I'm not a physician, I don't play one on TV...." )

"Dr. Harris concludes, “Most of the standard tests used to detect Lyme are notoriously unreliable. Explains Dr. Harris, “The initial thing patients usually get is a Western Blot antibody test. This test is not positive immediately after Bb exposure, and only 60% or 70% of people ever show antibodies to Bb.”

Most labs will test first with the Elisa Test, which is only about 30-40% accurate. If the test is negative, they usually do no further testing. If you are lucky enough to have a positive ELISA test , they will then follow up with the Western Blot test, which supposedly has an accuracy of 60-70%. This 2 tiered testing procedure was designed by the CDC for surveillance purposes only! And, there lies the problem. Most testing facilities and Doctors are using the 2 tier testing procedure to diagnose LD even though they can be highly inaccurate. This means many who have LD will test negative and will receive no treatment!"

Confused yet?

Stay tuned.

Next we can discuss autoimmune problems and Lyme Disease.

Teaser:

"Following approval of the vaccine, its entry in clinical practice was slow for a variety of reasons, including its cost, which was often not reimbursed by insurance companies.[115] Subsequently, hundreds of vaccine recipients reported they had developed autoimmune side effects."

I'm never going outside again.

Hay


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RE: Doxy

Want to see some more of my body?

I knew you'd look.

I think he's been on for about 24 hours. The only way I noticed it was that it was on my chest and I notice the redness and itchiness when I took off my shirt to shower. It had been about 24 hours since I'd spent any time outside working.

Take out a penny and you can see just how small these creatures can be. I'm suspecting this might have been the larvae stage since it was SO small. It's not bigger than the 0 in the date on the penny, no bigger than Lincoln's chin or nose.

There is absolutely no way to SAFELY get that tick off with tweezers.

Since I'm taking a regimen of Doxy, I'm trying to do more work outside, figuring that the Doxy will keep me from getting infected.

Life in the wonderful outdoors.

Came across this in my surfing. Interesting approach.

Lyme disease vaccine trials show promise

If the link doesn't work:

https://www.futurity.org/health-medicine/lyme-disease-vaccine-trials-show-promise/

"Luft says that for years, one of the main challenges of developing a Lyme disease vaccine was to discover a method that could produce a vaccine effective on all Borrelia species.
With the aid of technologies and expertise, Luft and Dunn focused vaccine development on the most abundant Borrelia outer surface protein found when the spirochete bacteria reside in ticks, which commonly transmit the disease.
Using the scaffold of this protein, called OspA, they, in collaboration with other researchers, bioengineered a set of unique OspA proteins not found in nature. These new OspAs share different parts from different species of Borrelia. The new proteins are called chimeras.
“After a series of experimentations and refinements, formulations consisting of these new OspA proteins were shown to protect against a broad spectrum of Lyme disease spirochetes,” says Luft, summarizing the research results."

Hay


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RE: Doxy

Maybe a nymph? I've found those attached to me--so small that I didn't know they were ticks until I put them under a powerful magnifying glass. They're considered especially dangerous because they can carry all the diseases spread by adult ticks, and yet they're extremely difficult to spot.

I've had numerous tick bites over the past several years, and have spent a total of 5 or 6 months on Doxy. I've suspected for some time that I have babesiosis, one of the co-infections. A top researcher told me it was unlikely that I have it because it hasn't been reported in my area. Well, now it has. The medical journal Emerging Infectious Diseases reported this month the emergence of babesiosis in eastern Pennsylvania.

I'm not surprised. Not only have I had the symptoms for some time, but when I worked as a reporter I did a story on babesiosis infecting the public blood supply.

Dave, I took Samento once. Never again. I took the smallest recommended dose--one drop in a glass of water--and woke up the next morning so dizzy I couldn't walk. Thank goodness this resolved by the end of the day, but it was a terrible day. According to an online Lyme community, my severe reaction showed that I really need to take it, starting with a smaller dose. But I couldn't risk it.

BTW, the rash doesn't always make an appearance. If it does, it can show up only briefly, so that if you don't happen to be looking at that time, you might not see it.

My county offers a valuable service: We can send them our ticks and they will ID them and tell us how long they were attached and what the risk of infection is. I've mailed them many ticks over the past few years. The most recent one (two weeks ago) was attached for 27 hours. The longest period was four days. That was last year, in March--I hadn't even started worrying about ticks, as it was still winter.


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RE: Doxy

Knock on wood... I don't think I've ever had a tick attach to me, and I've spent my life living in the rural Midwest, working outdoors, hunting in the woods, taking part in farming activities and heavy gardening, etc... either ticks don't like me, or I'm just lucky.

And I know we have ticks here... I've found them on more than one dog over the years.

I don't have an explanation, except for the fact that we do have to handle pest preventatives for the animals...


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RE: Doxy

Jodi, odd as it seems, I think it's possible ticks really do discriminate. My doctor calls me "the tick magnet." My son, who spends more time outdoors on this property than I, has had a remarkable lack of contact with ticks.


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RE: Doxy

We use the Samento to fight colds and the flu - it makes a huge difference.

You're the first person I know of who has had a nasty reaction to it - good info to know.


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RE: Doxy

It could also be that our exposure to various preventatives keeps us "parasite" free, as well. It's almost impossible not to get a little wormer or other preparations on your hands or arms when you're wrestling with livestock and other animals to administer it!

On the other hand, I do get swarmed by gnats, biting flies, sweat bees, mosquitoes, and anything else that can bite or sting whenever I'm outside... I find it odd that ticks don't like me!

Just cutting the grass leaves me loaded with itchy bites, though I have yet to find a tick. And other here can walk through the grass and find several ticks crawling on them.

Go figure!


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RE: Doxy

"And I know we have ticks here... I've found them on more than one dog over the years."

That might be your answer, right there.

You seem to suggest that you're home bound a lot. A friend and I were comparing notes. Understand that, up until very recently, I basically spent the whole day, in the summer, crawling around in the weeds like a rabbit. My friend spends her day in an office. But, she still gardens, rides her horse, cares for her horse. She was saying that she never has gotten a tick around her house. But, I pointed out to her that she's got quite a buffer zone. A big pasture with a horse that keeps the deer away. Deer carry the ticks around. She's got a dog and a cat to keep the critters away. Me, I can't look out my window without seeing some critter: chipmunks, squirrels, birds, deer, foxes, skunks, (I think one lives under my house), raccoons, (I came home one night to find one IN my house).

I think your dogs might be the key for you. Not your treating them, though. Those dogs make sure no tick bearing critter gets anywhere within striking distance of you.

No critters: no ticks.

My understanding, too, is that Dog Ticks, if that's the name, for whatever reason, very much prefer.... uh, dogs. I think I've seen that they don't really care for us.

Hay


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RE: Doxy

We might have a buffer zone of animals that attract the ticks, but how do you explain two people that live in the same house, one that picks ticks off of her all summer long... and myself, who never seems to be bothered by ticks?

It's either the preventatives we work with, of which I am usually in charge of dispensing... or the ticks simply don't care for my chemical makeup.


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RE: Doxy

  • Posted by vgkg 7-Va Tidewater (My Page) on
    Mon, Jul 29, 13 at 16:23

Well guess who's just got Lyme now --- your's truly.
Got DOXY Rx ok, take 2 per day and go back in 2 days for recheck. about 30 capsules. Last April I did wake up one morning and found a tiny tick on me that I thought was just a pin prick, just a tiny scab or so it looked like, nothing more, no legs, head, etc, just a tiny dark red dot on my right cafe. Had to put it under my scope to see any detail as these suckers are almost invisible. I kept an eye on that leg for weeks but no bullseye at all. About a week ago I noticed what seemed like a bug bite but being 3 months later without a bullseye I had forgotten about the tick. Symptoms are flu like without nose/lungs problems, but extremely weak, headache, fever (100.5F), chills, nite sweats, can't focus, tired as hell. My blood work showed my platelets dropped by half since my annual check- in Jan.

A 2" red blotch on my leg that expanded and looks like shingles or blood poisoning at first, hope the Doc is right (I think, ha) and the DOXY works. Thanks to our $1100/month insurance the DOXY cost $15 here. Such fun........


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RE: Doxy

Vgkg, what do they expect to see in two days? Fifteen days of doxy doesn't sound like very much. I had a prescription for 30 days the first time--until my vet pointed out that they treat dogs for two months.

I'm back on doxy too. Five tick bites so far this summer. The prescription cost me $45 . . . guess my insurance isn't as good as yours. :-)


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RE: Doxy

I wish you the best, VgKg... there are some decent books available that go into great detail about Lyme's disease... my son did some in depth reading after he contracted Lyme's several years ago. It's been an invaluable source of information for him.


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RE: Doxy

  • Posted by vgkg 7-Va Tidewater (My Page) on
    Mon, Jul 29, 13 at 17:03

Not sure of that answer myself Alisande, he'll follow up with blood work again and see if my perpetual hangover has subsided. If things are worse off in 48 hours he may run more tests to be 100% positive but Lyme is here Bigtime. Only have taken one capsule thus far and my headache does seem to be less intense, probably placebo effect? I will post updates on this. Being a gardener it's Just another reason to hate deer and ticks...why ain't the deer history yet?
Thanks Jodik

This post was edited by vgkg on Mon, Jul 29, 13 at 17:04


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RE: Doxy

That sucks (pun intended). Let us know how soon it takes to start feeling better, vgkg.


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RE: Doxy

  • Posted by vgkg 7-Va Tidewater (My Page) on
    Tue, Jul 30, 13 at 9:00

David, last nite was a better sleep for me though still had bed sweats. This morning my headache is gone and my mind is much clearer and focused. Temp below 100F now too. That's only after 2 doses so far, 3rd shortly.

I talked to my niece last nite who had lyme last spring, She had no bullseye skin marks. She found tick on her thigh and 3 weeks later it hit her hard. Had to go to hospital for dehydration and IV for 4 days, maxed out fever at 106F before recovering, she's fine now but we both had the exact same symptoms. The only difference is that she had no skin marks but I have a 3" wide mottled red/purplish mark on my leg cafe (pretty ugly), it seems stable today and hasn't expanded. Wish I had one of those pic/phones to post a pic, normally my legs are prettier than Hay's but not today :).


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RE: Doxy

My son notices the joint pain the most, I think, though he does talk about fatigue and other slight flu-like symptoms... and this is several years down the road from the initial tick bite. They didn't catch it early enough, and the medication given didn't seem to help a whole lot.

Many of the symptoms are similar to what I go through as a lupus patient... the fatigue, the joint pain, fevers, etc... so I can sympathize.

Even if the deer did disappear, the ticks would surely find another favored host! They probably just don't like me because I have Ivomec and other things coursing through my systems from working with animals! Not that it matters much...

But I do hope you get to feeling better... it is sucky, as David says.


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RE: Doxy

vgkg, how awful! I'm going to have to do some research on this. We have lots of deer here .....they love my gardens :(

Take care and be well soon.


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RE: Doxy

By chance, there's an article in CNN this morning about Lyme disease... it seems there are still lingering questions and unknowns surrounding this and similar ailments...

Here is a link that might be useful: Lyme


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RE: Doxy

Thanks for the link, Jodi. Weintraub's book was the best I've read on the subject.

Vgkg, your symptoms sound like they might be caused by babesia, a Lyme co-infection. It can occur with Lyme from the same tick. Babesiosis hasn't been reported in VA, but that could be because no one--including most physicians--never heard of it. For a time it wasn't reported where I live either (northeast PA), but now it has officially emerged, having been reported in the Journal of Emerging Infectious Diseases. When I worked as a reporter I did a feature article on babesia's presence in the public blood supply.

Doxy is one of the meds used to treat babesiosis; the other is something used for malaria. Trouble is, one would want to be certain of the diagnosis before taking the drug, and that's not easy to do. I've been seeking an affordable way to do this for two years.


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RE: Doxy

  • Posted by vgkg 7-Va Tidewater (My Page) on
    Tue, Jul 30, 13 at 17:46

Geeze, what's Mother Nature going to throw at us next?!
Feeling more myself after 24 hours, about at 50+%, was up to driving so delivered some veggies. No yard stuff yet other than picking a few things, doxy & sun don't mix well. Still too tired to get out there for real work anyways, just glad the headaches are gone and fever broke.

Hey Hay!
Sorry, I didn't mean to divert your thread, can switch to another one if you wish. Hope your recovery is progressing well. Thx for the well wishes folks.
Will see doc tomorrow for update.


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RE: Doxy

doxy & sun don't mix well.

To put it mildly.


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RE: Doxy

  • Posted by vgkg 7-Va Tidewater (My Page) on
    Wed, Jul 31, 13 at 15:44

OK, here's the bottom line and the final one I hope. If this develops into something else I'll just start a related thread on the conversations page.

Doc said that it looks good this morning, I'm feeling much better though still too weak to do major chores. Platelets returning to normal, most bad symptoms easing or gone. Brain a bit more focused but body fatigued. No chiils, fever, or bad headaches. Doc basically told me that Doxy starves the microbes via their metabolism and that they'll die off in about 10 days, hence the 2 week Rx.

Before I even brought it up he said that if it's not actually lyme it probably is "Ecrlichosis" and less likely "Babesiosis"., all 3 which would be treated with Doxy. So I feel covered which ever one that dam tick gave me. There are 3 stages of Lyme and he believes that I'm still in #1, the easiest to mend. The one thing that does puzzle him is the leg markings, he thinks that I did get tick bit but that I also got spider bit too which is the source of the non-lyme like marking. (no brown recluses around here).

I'm to complete the 2 weeks of Doxy and return to him in 3 weeks for a final follow-up, but earlier if things persist. But after just 5 doses of doxy I'm hopeful that my ship is turning around, it sure seems to be.

I hope that the rest of you or your family members who are on doxy now are recovering even if it's on a slower road to get there. Stages 2 & esp 3 are much farther out to turn around on. If things go south on me I'll surely update again. Thanks for all your thoughts and support!!!


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RE: Doxy

Glad to read that you're on the mend!


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RE: Doxy

Glad you're feeling better ,vgkg. Lyme is a very scary disease and so many are suffering from it and don't know they have it. Makes one want to do a body check every time you're outside. My last exposure came from my own back yard, but I caught it quick enough that one pill was all the doctor ordered and I never developed symptoms.


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RE: Doxy

And the crazy thing is how tiny the ticks that bite you can be! You may not ever notice them because you need a magnifying glass just to see them!


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RE: Doxy

And the crazy thing is how tiny the ticks that bite you can be! You may not ever notice them because you need a magnifying glass just to see them!


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RE: Doxy

And the crazy thing is how tiny the ticks that bite you can be! You may not ever notice them because you need a magnifying glass just to see them!


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RE: Doxy

Before I even brought it up he said that if it's not actually lyme it probably is "Ecrlichosis" and less likely "Babesiosis"., all 3 which would be treated with Doxy. So I feel covered which ever one that dam tick gave me. There are 3 stages of Lyme and he believes that I'm still in #1, the easiest to mend. The one thing that does puzzle him is the leg markings, he thinks that I did get tick bit but that I also got spider bit too which is the source of the non-lyme like marking. (no brown recluses around here).

Vgkg, is your rash streaky, or in pieces? If so, it could indicate Bartonella, another Lyme co-infection. Here's one example, but they don't all look like that.

Last year I had a rash under one arm that my doctor and the dermatologist he sent me to couldn't identify. It looked like little bars, separate from one another and set at different angles. I now know that it could have been caused by Bartonella. I'm told Bart sweats tend to be sticky.


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RE: Doxy

  • Posted by vgkg 7-Va Tidewater (My Page) on
    Thu, Aug 1, 13 at 9:40

Thanks again folks for the good wishes but unless there are long term effects I think I'll be ok. Right now the worst effects are from the doxy which can be quite nauseating.

Alisande, that's one weird rash! But no that's nothing like mine. The best way I can describe my rash is as if someone took brass knuckles and hit me in the shin in the same area 3-4 times with them. This morning the "rash" (which is really more like a bruse) is fading a bit. Deeper red areas are more lighter now, it has stopped expanding, and it never was itchy, painful, or very sencitive to the touch. But as you can see my spelling is still recovering :) Last nite was my first sleep where I did not wake up in a wet tee-shirt.


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RE: Doxy

Hope that all the poor posters who have contracted tick diseases are successfully treated!

As I said upthread, I'm bitten by deer ticks at least a half dozen times a year. Fortunately, I get an itchy reaction and usually find them right away. The cat gets them too, around her eyes and ears. The deer ticks can show up as early as March, and the peak period for nymphs around here seems to be June. Right now it's quiet. Haven't seen one for over a month.

Here's a pic I took last June before shaving off the tick - gives you an idea of the size of a nymph (ruler is metric).


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RE: Doxy

One of the top local stories on TV tonight was PA has more Lyme disease cases than any other state. Wonderful. I thought the NE states were worse ,but no. They profiled a young teen girl who was bitten by a tick, and a few weeks later the bulls-eye rash appeared. She is in really bad shape; her dad carries her around ,and she uses a wheelchair. She was active playing soccer, gymnastics, in her previous life, but this has debilitated her. She developed RA from Lyme. Her medical bills are thousands a month, and they were doing a fundraiser for her.


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RE: Doxy

Man... either you guys have an overabundance of ticks, or they hide when they see me coming! I have yet to see more than 3 or 4 ticks this entire season!


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RE: Doxy

  • Posted by vgkg 7-Va Tidewater (My Page) on
    Tue, Aug 20, 13 at 10:49

No need to start a new thread on this but you may have already heard that Lyme infections have been under estimated by a factor of 10. So it's not 30,000 cases in the US each year but more like 300,000 cases and growing....

Here is a link that might be useful: Lucky me....


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RE: Doxy

I'm glad to see Lyme getting so much press recently, although all the news is bad. But I wish they'd pay more attention to the co-infections--other diseases transmitted by ticks.

I'll bet the CDC announcement brought out all the TV network "medical experts" to make pronouncements about Lyme. And I'll bet they all contradicted one another. So many firm opinions, and no one (including myself) knows the true facts.

Here's a good article from the Boston Globe on lingering (chronic) tick illness.


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RE: Doxy

Today I came across an article about Lyme disease and ticks. The gist of the article is that, because of the weather, we're in for a bad year with ticks and Lyme disease and the next 4 weeks is the peak of the peak.

The article was quoting an expert in the subject, a professor at Tufts. For any of you interested in the subject, especially this time of year when we're heading into the worst part of the year, you might, like me, find some of the articles I came across when I googled his name, Sam Telford, to be very informative and interesting.

Happy reading!

This time of year, I run to my car.

Hay


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RE: Doxy

Hay, everything up here including the tick situation, is like it was back in the day when we were kids up for a couple weeks' vacation from the city: massive amount of bugs, cold nights (40's).

The winter also harkened old times: long, cold, snowy, late spring.

We found our first ticks of the season inside the house during the last snowstorm of the season, around the 1st of May, and they have been plentiful along with the skeeters, since. Fortunately, we finally had a huge dragonfly hatch, so that situation is improving. Lyme disease is common around here and has been for years.

Hot dry weather generally kills them off to an extent. We don't get much of that.


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RE: Doxy

Thanks for the link, Hay. I read a lot about ticks, but hadn't heard of Sam Telford. Maybe that's because i don't live in New England.

In one of the "Telford Talks Tough" articles he states that a female tick lays her eggs in May and they hatch in July. The tick larvae feed from July through September. Larvae are not infected, so they pose no risk to us.

I mention this because I was bitten a couple of weeks ago by an exceedingly tiny tick (I needed a high-powered magnifier to even know that it had legs) that was later identified by a vector control agency as a deer tick larva. This contradicts the schedule Telford describes.

One could say the tick was actually a nymph, not a larva, but I tend to believe vector control because I was bitten by a nymph last year, and it was slightly bigger than this one--although for the nymph, too, I needed the magnifier.

In any case, I hope vector control was correct. I like the "uninfected" status.

Here's a photo of what they called a larva. If you hold a dime up to the picture of the dime, you'll get a sense of just how small the tick was.


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RE: Doxy

We don't usually have a problem with ticks in our area. In a bad year, we might find one on a dog here and there... but so far this season, I've pulled two pretty good sized ticks off my husband... they don't seem to like me, but I wear protective clothing when working outside, and I check thoroughly before coming in.

I'd say this year will be bad for ticks and Lyme's... conditions seem to be right for tick reproduction... or something!


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RE: Doxy

  • Posted by vgkg 7-Va Tidewater (My Page) on
    Sat, Jun 14, 14 at 18:27

Ticks are already heavy here too, after catching lyme last summer (hopefully fully cured with doxy) after working in the garden some days I feel like taking a shower with dog shampoo.


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RE: Doxy

You know what's better than dog shampoo for fleas and ticks? Joy dish washing liquid.

The fleas and ticks hate it for some reason, and they jump off in the tub... where you can kill them easily. It's what we've always used for pests on dogs. Works like a charm!


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