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Howses

Posted by pnbrown z6.5 MA (My Page) on
Sun, Jul 21, 13 at 16:44

What's the deal with all the Canadian-made house shows? Just another example of America losing its edge, we can't make a decent house show?

If my wife keeps watching them, I'll be fluent in Canadian...


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Howses

Eh? Think SCTV's McKenzie Brothers and not elvis' pirate "aye".

Cable shows have both a limited audience and revenues from advertising. And Canada provides significant subsidies for film and movie production. Programs you wouldn't imagine are filmed in Canada

I tire of those HGTV shows pretty quickly. Every once in a while I catch a show, usually featuring a couple from Britain, with their funds socked away for a long dreamed of retirement home. I don't know - a stone, three walled (two of them partially standing) roofless cattle barn in Romania doesn't get me rooting, "pick number 3!"


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Doesn't Canada have a fairly decent sized movie and television industry? I often see credits listing Canadian cities and production companies, whether it's a movie or a television production...


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No doubt. The US has a tv industry as well.

The curiosity is why do they dominate the house-show market? I think it's because of the way Canadians pronounce "house" - irresistibly quaint to our ears and so there is a mad demand in the US for Canadian house shows.

There you go, bob's-your-uncle and some people are rolling in dough....


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edited to delete

This post was edited by blfenton on Sun, Jul 21, 13 at 17:51


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I used to watch some of them on Sunday evenings. They were generally well done and included a minimum of advertising worked into the script (unlike US-made shows).

Now I skip them all because they have become reality shows for the young and rental classes.

PS: US-made gardening shows ran a similar gamut from useful and practical to informercials.

This post was edited by marshallz10 on Sun, Jul 21, 13 at 17:53


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Duluth, that roofless cattle barn and "pick number 3!" is what I like most about House Hunters International! Going around the world and seeing how people live is fascinating for me. HHI has been, for starters, to Nepal, Kenya, Vietnam, Colombia, Guatemala, Jordan, Israel, Egypt, the interiors of Cambodia, China, and Mongolia (where else will I see what Ulan Bator actually looks like, except on Nat.Geo., which we don't get), the other day to Vilnius, Lithuania, and on and on.

HGTV is often discussed in great critical detail over on the Home Decor site, where it is slammed for relentlessly pushing a certain "look" - granite countertops, stainless steel appliances, hardwood floors, the ripping out of beautifully tiled 1940s bathrooms, and I agree that most of its programs now are junk, but I still enjoy House Hunters. Am sure that they produce or buy so many Canadian shows because those are less expensive. BTW, am not equating Canadian programs with junk; the worst, most fake-and-phony show, Love It Or List It, is U.S. made.


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sable_ca (whispering) unless there is more than one Love it or List it show it is Canadian made so you needn't take credit for it. One is based in Toronto and now one in Vancouver and the one in Vancouver is hosted by the failed bachelorette Jillian Harris.

As to why we seemed to have cornered the market on DIY and home decorating shows - who knows- perhaps because they are cheap to make.

But we do have a vibrant domestic tv production industry as well producing great shows such as Flashpoint, Corner Gas (hilarious if you have never seen it), The Listener, Nikita for the Canadian market.

There are a number of shows and movies made in Canada as well usually because of tax credits/grants and especially when our dollar is lower.


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I used to catch HHI every so often and enjoyed it and sometimes, depending on where it is located still do, but that is hardly depicting people organically going through the process of buying a home. On the contrary, it is scripted and fake and needs to be taken with a grain of salt. Some of the houses shown aren't really up for sale and others have already been purchased before they "pick".

This is from Huffpo, but there are other stories from the
Daily Mail , Slate , Hooked on Houses and other sites.

My friend Annie, a 30-something from the East Coast, had her home featured on "House Hunters International" in 2011--and believe it or not, has even juicier details to divulge. Here's what she had to say:
When I was attempting to sell my vacation home in a quiet resort town in Mexico, a realtor friend suggested that we contact the producers of "House Hunters" to see if they would consider using it for their International spin-off. The show had beed filmed in the same area before, and the realtor had seen a notable increase in interest in local real estate after the show had aired.

The producers were interested, and just as the latest reports confirmed, had ideas for "buyers" who were already on their way to owning a home in the area. I was a little weary of offering up my villa as one of the two "reject" properties, and allowing the potential buyers to point out any flaws or downsides to the home on television, but was quickly convinced when my realtor reminded me of the millions of HGTV viewers who could be potential buyers.

But here's the best part, and a detail that other reports failed to expose: the actual almost-home-owners were American expats in their late fifties, looking forward to owning a beautiful beach retreat as a getaway. On the contrary, HGTV was hoping to feature a younger couple to appeal to a wider audience, and steer away from the typical retirees that are often depicted on "House Hunters International." So, not only were the homes ones that weren't actually being considered, but the producers swapped in a younger couple to play the buyers.

Though we're disappointed to learn all this, getting a peek at amazing homes around the world will continue to be our favorite guilty pleasure.

Edited to add: Having purchased properties ourselves overseas and watching family members do so as well I wish it was as easy and carefree as they make it seem.

Here is a link that might be useful: House Hunters International not real

This post was edited by epiphyticlvr on Sun, Jul 21, 13 at 19:43


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Sable, I don't disagree that catching glimpses of how the rest of the world lives has a fascination. I did see the HHI episode with a couple looking for an affordable apartment to rent in Paris which had either some breathing room or a closet. My conflict is always what I take for granted as opposed to what the wider world probably cannot imagine.

I do occasionally peruse the Home Decorating forums and what's "in or out" on a routine basis makes my head spin. My 1935 kitchen - though more than adequate, cheery, and nice with some features that would be upgrades today - would likely be tantamount to cave dwelling with nowhere to plug in all those restaurant grade appliances.

What happened to the "garden" end of HGTV? Any gardening shows at all? What few there were when I came later than most to cable did get pretty formulaic with all the plants that could possibly fall off the back of a Monrovia truck and planted for those who probably had no knowledge or interest in caring for them.


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HGTV should just be called HTV, IMO. There are no serious gardening shows left. Bummer.


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Blfenton - Well. Am surprised! The hard, off-putting come-on of the two LIOLI hosts seems to me so American - excuse me, fellow Yanks - so I simply assumed. I have watched the second version a couple of times and it's better, but still so formulaic - "Oh dear, we have discovered that all your pipes are rotten; this will take $50,000 from your budget. No new kitchen!" "OMG!" Blech.

Epi - The fact that House Hunters is obviously scripted and that the final choice has already been made is not new news. There are at most 22 minutes in which to cram the start-to-finish experience, so I don't think we can expect much to be organic. I take the show as a guessing game for the viewers, as well as an opportunity to compare living in Madison WI with Katmandu and Hanoi and Naples, and that's fun.

While I've never purchased property overseas, I have had to apartment-hunt in three other countries, so am very interested in seeing how young American women approach foreign living today. My kitchens in London and Jerusalem were, to say the least, um, "dated". :)

Duluth - Yes, the gardening shows are gone. I guess that they just don't sell the ads. The only one left that touches on planting is Curb Appeal, and that is more about redoing the exterior of the house itself and its porch and installing furniture somewhere. The plants they add are often annuals crammed in for color, with no information as to appropriateness or care. When I first retired, HGTV had two early-morning garden shows - one was a half hour spent on a single beautiful property - and I would get my coffee and newspaper and bask in the inspiration. But they have been gone for years.


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I take the show as a guessing game for the viewers, as well as an opportunity to compare living in Madison WI with Katmandu and Hanoi and Naples, and that's fun.

I agree. But you would be surprised at how many people actually think it is real.

As I said above, I still watch at times depending on where they are and enjoy it but now I guess which house they previously picked instead of thinking that they are actually making a real choice between the 3.

I have had to apartment-hunt in three other countries, so am very interested in seeing how young American women approach foreign living today. My kitchens in London and Jerusalem were, to say the least, um, "dated". :)

Ha! I know exactly what you are saying. I too rented in London and Tel Aviv and Amman so I have been there. Learning that appliances didn't come with apartments in some countries was an eye opener to say the least as was the no closets "klum". And the condition of some apartments were beyond description.

Since then we have purchased and renovated and sold a home in Tel Aviv and then decided to purchase a new build so we didn;t have to go through that again and also in France and other family members purchased and renovated in Italy and Spain, all have had their own unique set of differences and trials and tribulations. It is indeed eye opening.

This post was edited by epiphyticlvr on Sun, Jul 21, 13 at 22:11


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There are many gardening shows and show-and-tells on the internet, Utube and vimeo dominating. The better seed and plant companies are active in producing these episodes but there are other organizations and individuals with a lust of gardening, irrigation, Permaculture and such. Some are very informative and well done without the commercialization seen on most cable and network shows.

Those home and recently deceased gardening shows are produced to amuse couch potatoes. Not a hard task.


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HGTV used to be my favorite cable channel. Our previous carrier didn't have it ,and so I changed just to get it. I'm now so tired of it , I rarely watch. Love It or List It is one stupid show, and I see there are two versions of it now as if one wasn't bad enough. Always the same story line. Do they think we are stupid? I did watch Design Star tonight where contestants vie for the chance to have their own show...and then they disappear! What ever happened to Emily who won a few years ago? They seem to vanish. Now the Property brothers have a new show. It's very gimmicky now. And where are the Canadian show filmed, because I think the houses are very expensive...am always amazed.

Agree that there are no gardens for the G in their name.


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I agree with Marshall, one can find a tube video about any imaginable horticulture (or anything else, for that matter).

Now, another tv oddity is that it seems all the logging shows are made in the US 48 and Alaska, which is a bit strange considering how much logging goes on in Canada. If shows are cheaper to make there then you'd sure think they'd dominate the logging shows. I guess they just can't find anybody in Canada as weirdly fascinating as the characters they dredge up in "swamp loggers".....

Here is another mystery: how come it's perfectly ok for me to have to watch house shows with my wife, but she has never watched one second of swamp-loggers?


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watching boys playing in the mud?? what's not to like?


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I, too, am rather disappointed in the lack of gardening shows on HGTV, and as a result do not watch the channel any longer. There use to be a bunch of craft shows on HGTV, as well. It's turned into a rather disappointing channel, in my opinion, and should be renamed to reflect its subject material.

I really don't care for shows about real estate or makeovers that don't speak to frugality.


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lily - the shows are filmed in Vancouver and Toronto. Vancouver has the highest housing prices in Canada with an average selling price of about $1,000,000 for a single family dwelling in Greater Vancouver (Vancouver and it's suburbs) For Vancouver proper it would probably be about $1,250,000 and then on the west side of Vancouver we're talking close to $2,000,000.

jodik - tough to be frugal when you're renovating a house with those values - the buying market now, as in probably other expensive housing markets, won't buy cheaply renovated homes.

What's unfortunate is that Vancouver has become one of the least affordable housing markets in the world when you measure housing prices against income.

Oh and Love it or List it - watched about 10 minutes of it one night and turned it off. I don't watch HGTV because it seems to be very unrealistic. I used to watch HHI to look at the scenery and types of homes that are around the world.


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What is an average income in Vancouver?


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I do watch HGTV all the time, especially HHI--I call the channel "house porn." I just like to see houses anywhere in the world, all the views and walk-in closets and furniture--a guilty pleasure, I guess.


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The average income in Metro Vancouver was $41,176 in 2009.
The major reason house prices have risen so much is due to the influx of very rich foreign money, particularly Chinese, over the last many years.


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For Vancouver proper the average income is about $68,000. Here's an article with an interesting table at the bottom. I know there is an affordability-index table which I'll try to find.

Here is a link that might be useful: what your money won't buy


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PnB, if I had cable, DH would be required to watch the house shows if I was so that when inspiration strikes, the person I intend to do the work can see what the inspiration is. Mystery solved


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HGTV and the The Food Network have both morphed into pseudo reality type shows, competitions, challenges, makeovers, uuuugh !

I long to have the real garden shows and cooking shows back but it ain't happening. The target audience has changed and it makes good business sense to cater to that demographic.

So I shall just have to pour a glass of wine and pull out my Jacques Pepin and Julia Child recordings...


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We opt instead for channels like Discovery or NatGeo, or Animal Planet... though I must admit that our television is most often tuned in to Cartoon Network!


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HGTV and the The Food Network have both morphed into pseudo reality type shows, competitions, challenges, makeovers, uuuugh !

Agreed! We watch them much less now then when they first came on.The only show I watch on HGTV is HHI and only sporadically, and now the same with the Food Channel and never the reality shows, competitions, etc. Just the "old fashioned" cooking shows and some of the specials. What I miss most is Anthony Bourdain's shows on the Travel Channel (No Reservations and The Layover). Now I don't watch that channel at all because it has little to do with travel just like the Learning Channel has little to do with learning (anything!).


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Yes, TLC is just about little people and abnormally large families.


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I've been enjoying the repeats of Anthony Bourdain's "Parts Unknown" on CNN. CNN has renewed it for a second season starting Sept. 15, and will visit Spain, New Mexico, Israel, Copenhagen, Sicily, Detroit, Tokyo and India.

I don't watch much of anything on NatGeo. The launch of that channel was exciting times and we expected programming akin to what appeared in the monthly magazine. I believe FOX owns a controlling interest which could be explanation enough.


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I don' t get TLC at all........a serious misnomer.


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I've been enjoying the repeats of Anthony Bourdain's "Parts Unknown" on CNN. CNN has renewed it for a second season starting Sept. 15, and will visit Spain, New Mexico, Israel, Copenhagen, Sicily, Detroit, Tokyo and India.

Yes, I watch that as well but enjoyed his other shows a bit more. A friend is involved with his trips to Israel and Spain so I am looking forward to seeing those shows. Bourdain used to be here fairly often as his close friend and former boss lives in my building. We see him much less now but I got to meet his wife who is lovely and his daughter is just adorable.

Stopped watching NatGeo a while ago but didn't know that Fox was involved. Some things now make sense to me. I also used to like the Discovery channel but that has changed drastically over the years too. I still enjoy some of the programming on the History channel.


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However..........If you're a genealogy fan, don't miss Who Do You Think You Are on TLC. The season begins Tuesday, July 23. It's been very well done in the past.


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Thanks for the tip, I am a genealogy fan.


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I agree, it's an enjoyable show but I wonder why NBC didn't pick it up again instead of relegating it to one of their subsidiary channels. Perhaps to try to restore some credibility to the channel which it is sorely lacking.


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Duluth: "Eh? Think SCTV's McKenzie Brothers and not elvis' pirate "aye".

"Eh" must be a Canada thing. That's where the MacKenzie Bros. are from, ay? I often spell "aye" because the "a" is long (rhymes with "may"). But some people think "ayes & nays." Sounds like "eye." I spent the weekend at the seashore in the U.P., and asked around. Many Yoopers spell it "ay". Nobody spells it "eh", which rhymes with "meh".

Frank: "Yes, TLC is just about little people and abnormally large families."

"Little people?" Like Munchkins?


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I can't believe that I am doing this again, but here goes. Elvis, google it. Yoopers say "eh". They spell it "eh".

Here is proof. Accept it. Don't accept it. I do not care anymore.

Here is a link that might be useful: You were wrong again, eh?


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Yoopers are from northern MI, I take it? We've been hanging out with a kid from MI this summer....such midwestern vowels! I'm always surprised at how far east that speech pattern extends, all the way to the northwestern corner of MA, in fact.


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I see the problem, Frank. "Eh" to me rhymes with "meh." "Eh" to you and apparently many others rhymes with "day."

According to this source, "Depends on where you're from. The most commonly understood way to pronounce it is like the "ay" in "day" but perhaps a little shorter."

Brown, Yoopers are from the U (Upper) P. (Peninsula) of Michigan, which is about 20 minutes up the road from me.

Never saw Yooper talk in writing, just from conversing with Yoopers. Although we're 17 miles from the state line, we also use "aye" "ay" "eh" (I don't care how you spell it; pronounce it to rhyme with "day"). We also say "Oh, ya?" (rhymes with "pa"), and many other "Yooper-isms." It's a regional thing.

Here is a link that might be useful: Aye?


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Fargo, ya?


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I looked for that original round 'n round thread, frank, but it must have twirled off page 67. Couldn't even find it on Google.

We have a bit of the "Yooper" in us up here - gets even thicker in some of the Range Cities a bit to the North. And they use the more clipped "eh" (as in day).


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But in Fargo, "ya" means "you". "Yah" is assent or yes. A sublety only a northern Midwesterner can pick up on.


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Duluth,

I found a couple of the threads. I could not find the first one though.

http://forums.gardenweb.com/forums/load/hottopics/msg0409290026683.html
http://forums.gardenweb.com/forums/load/hottopics/msg0718531026758.html


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In Fargo there's that awesome scene where what's her name (the cop), keeps saying "oh, ya?" over and over, to this other person, who was blatting on and on about something. The best part of the film, practically.

She wasn't saying "oh, you", she was saying "really?" (oh, yes), with a subtext of "don't you ever shut up?".


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Just for fun - here's the opening text (Wikipedia) from Fargo. Enough ya's and yah's to catch a drift.

Here is a link that might be useful: Not to put too fine a point on it


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Ok, point taken. It's a transliteration issue.


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"It's a transliteration issue."

Um, not. But your point taken also.


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If I examine my own speech, I find that I pronounce the word "you" differently, quite often, and it seems to depend on where it falls in a sentence and/or emphasis.

So that could be transliterated variously as "ya"; "yoo" or "yew"; "tcha", and probably more.

I bet the variation in pronunciation of "yeah" is much more of a regional identifier, however. I never say "yah" (unless I am imitating a role from Fargo). To my ear that pronunciation sounds scandinavian, and if it comes from a native english speaker then they must be from the northern midwest.


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There is definitely a large Scandinavian influence here and some of the speech is referred to as "Minnewegian". I've tried (with living away for years), but can't seem to completely get away from my part in, say, a phone conversation being punctuated with a lot of "yah's" - especially with those a bit more talky and dominant than I tend to be on the phone. It's an assent but also means "I'm listening".


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