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Fukushima

Posted by don_socal socal (My Page) on
Sat, Jul 13, 13 at 23:54

Here are four links about the situation at the Fukushima plant from different levels of interest. The last story if true is particularly scary. The interest of each precludes the level of reporting but the interest of those possibly affected is clearly a higher concern to them. We may be affected.

Strontium detected in well on seaward side of Fukushima plant

State withholds more than 60% of Fukushima cleanup budget

Fukushima Groundwater Shows Record Radiation Levels

What the Fukushima 2013?

Edit to add another link to worry about...

Fukushima Spiking All of a Sudden

This post was edited by don_socal on Sun, Jul 14, 13 at 0:37


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Fukushima

Regardless of how much contamination results from F, and how much came from Chyrn, it is known, due to some testing done of hardwood ash in the northeastern US and Canada, that the trees have taken up significant amounts of radioactive isotopes from the fall-out of weapons testing during the 40's, 50's, and 60's that was washed into the soil by rain and then concentrated by tree growth into the wood. Cesium-137 in particular is taken up plants as they do not distinguish it from normal K.

So wood-ash averages about four or five times background on a counter. One might think this would be a concern to use as fertilizer, but it turns out that our bodies take in huge amounts of naturally-occurring radioactive K over a lifetime, such that it would be difficult to accumulate much higher concentrations from the diet.


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RE: Fukushima

Don, I confess to not reading all of your links, but I have read enough elsewhere to know that the Fukushima disaster has and will have far-reaching effects we have yet to even begin to understand. But I also think that big economic and political interests would prefer that Americans follow the George Zimmeram trial than present and pending environmental degradation. The media plays into that and so we have literally hundreds of posts about Zimmerman but this incredibly significant issue languishes. We are really screwed up.


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RE: Fukushima

For the most part, people aren't interested in salvaging anything that would make our planet remain viable... there's no profit in it.

Earth will go down in flames, with the USA leading the way in causation...


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RE: Fukushima

"Earth will go down in flames, with the USA leading the way in causation..."

Classic end-times fantastical thinking. Just think about the implied self-importance in that fallacious viewpoint: "because I am alive now, this must be the end-times". It is the flip side of the coin from "because I am alive now, technology will prevent any major disaster".

The reality is that neither of those commonly-held viewpoints are going to happen.


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RE: Fukushima

I am so depressed about the seriousness of the Fukushima-driven environmental degradation; I and my farm are in the zone of radionuclide fallout. I and my crews have be complaining of increased tiredness. Some of my farm crops have been under-performing compared to those of past years even though the weather and soil tests are improved over those past cropping periods. My pole bean crops are weak and yielding a lot less than in prior years. Bean plants that normally reach 10-12 feet are petering out a 6-7 feet.

My populations of bird species is markedly down at the farm; the scrub jays and mockingbirds have abandoned their normal nesting places. The number of quail is less than half of prior years with only a few breeding pairs with young.


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RE: Fukushima

Marshall, I fear that your experience will become even more common as this phenomenon spreads. While pnbrown is correct that the world will not end in my personal lifetime, it is naive to pretend that we are not on a crash course with disaster. I have a bunch of grandkids--what will this world be like for them and all those who come after them?
The bird population, especially the smaller species, has been steadily decreasing where I live in the mid-Atlantic region. This is not due to radiation, but largely to loss of habitat, less use of native species in people's home gardens, and more pesticides. In other words, the degradation of the environment has multiple sources. But the Fukushima is a really big one--too bad it's not "sexy" enough for the media.


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RE: Fukushima

  • Posted by ohiomom 3rdrockfromthesun (My Page) on
    Mon, Jul 15, 13 at 9:08

Marshall and Pidge the "common theme" is the debt we are leaving our children/grandchildren and not the environment.

I do have to agree with PNB in that the animal species (which includes us) will adapt to a very different environment, and have to wonder how this will effect our evolution (DNA).


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RE: Fukushima

I also agree that animal and plant species can adapt to a changed environment. The problem is that the adaptation occurs over a long period of time and that we have substantially shortened that period of time. The impact on humans is beyond my scientific knowledge, but it's an important aspect to consider.

Events like the Fukushima meltdown certainly reduce the possibility of adaptation because the change in environment has been so rapid. So does the BP spill and the Exxon spill among other tragedies attributable to human behavior.


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RE: Fukushima

We found that so many species were faced with extinction and we did something about it. Many of these animals are no longer on the endangered species list. We see a problem and we find a way to fix it. It's just what we do. It's true that some wring their hands and proclaim the sky is falling, but this earth will be around for a long long time. So far, nothing has been unfixable.


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RE: Fukushima

Doesn't have anything to do with "end times", PNBrown... I'm an atheist.

I'm also a realist, and even if you can't, I can see the writing on the wall. It may take a while, but we're leading the charge over the cliff's edge.


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RE: Fukushima

Exactly how are we doing that jodik? And can you leave out the word greed? Our food is safer than it's ever been, our drinking water is safer than it's ever been. Medical strides are such that we are living twice as long as we did a hundred years ago. We have the endangered species act that have saved a multitude of animals, birds, and reptiles from going into extinction. Our CO2 emissions continue to decline. We now have over 106 million acres of pure wilderness within the US. And the list goes on. So where is the edge of that cliff?


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RE: Fukushima

mrskjun, where are you getting your information. Specialists are claiming on good evidence that this is one of the earth's greatest species extinction periods in the geologic record. Many of these extinctions are not even being recorded because the organisms are yet unknown to science. Other species persist in small numbers compared to earlier populations; many have larger zoo populations than exist in their natural ranges. By far the most numerous species are microorganism. We are a planet dominated by both marine life and microorganisms. In fact we are eliminating most of the competing predators and herbivores in favor of expanding human populations.


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RE: Fukushima

marshall, there will always be a natural extinction rate, that would occur even if not a single human resided on the earth. I did not claim perfection, I claim that we see the problems and work to fix them. Not throw up our hands and sit down and wait for the end.


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RE: Fukushima

Of course there are always extinctions and also new species appear, some persisting and other dying out. The rate of species extinctions puts this time in notable company of a few other geologic epochs when massive die offs occurred. Ours is so notable because these die offs have happened in relatively few millennia and corresponding to human dominance of the planet.

Loss of habitat and excessive harvesting have accounted for much of the loss of larger species.


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RE: Fukushima

The problem is that some people think that saving a few near extinct species is entirely adequate. I think that mrsk is like the majority of Americans who think that bringing back the bald eagle has solved the issue of a declining bird population. But the fallout from Fukushima and the BP and Exxon spills have altered the habitat of many species in ways that cannot be fixed. Despite the claims about food and water safety in the United States (and I would like some verification of those claims), most of the world is going under because of scarcity of resources. It's not just about "us."


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RE: Fukushima

No pidge, that is quite the opposite of what I am saying. It's not entirely adequate at all. But we are aware, we are working at it, we are also trying our best to help the world. We have aided other countries in obtaining fresh water and producing food. We look for the answers, we work on solutions. Is the answer to sit in the corner and suck our thumbs? Even if you do what you can do in your own little corner of the world, it helps.


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RE: Fukushima

mrsk, you appear to have internalized the myth that the tiny bits of work we are doing to help ourselves and others get food and water is an adequate antidote to the huge corporate, economic, and political powers that have caused a lot of the problems in the first place. I live in PA where fracking is reaping havoc in many areas of the state, ruining farmland, and creating a situation from which the state could or could not recover--but doesn't care enough to try and alter. Those oil interests override everything else, and our governor is indifferent to the consequences. I think it's very naive to think that introducing a wheat crop in a foreign country can possibly compensate for the damage that corporate America--in fact, the whole corporate apparatus all over the world--is doing to the environment. We brought back the grey wolf from danger of extinction and what did that get us? Cattle ranchers, often using federal lands for grazing, are eager to kill them off all over again. You may find comfort in providing a cow to poor farmer in an African nation--and that is a very good thing--but it just does not compensate for the damage done to this planet on a large scale.


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RE: Fukushima

I guess we can respectfully disagree pidge. I remain of the belief that we have the skills and knowledge to overcome any destruction.


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RE: Fukushima

Thanks Marshallz and Pidge...

Some folks continue to see things in miniature microcosms, while it's the whole that's so adversely affected by humankind and his behaviors.

Is avarice a more suitable word? Regardless of the dictionary term used, greed and gluttony describe the behaviors humankind continues to exhibit in plundering the planet for its natural resources, causing many extinctions and planetary issues along the way.

Earth is a planet of finite resources, and is the only planet that will support life as we know it. We can continue on the path to total ruination, or we can stop and realize that we're not the only generation... we can become more forward looking, and leave a viable planet for our progeny.


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RE: Fukushima

Jodik, of course you will correct me as to your exact mind-set, but what do you mean by bombastic statements such as "the earth will go down in flames"?

Since the metaphor is that of a fighter plane careening to ground, out of control, and burning its occupants just before destroying totally the occupants and the machine, then I have to assume that you mean by that at the very least the extinction of humans, if not all mammals. or maybe you mean all life.

Define which and how many species will be entirely eliminated, and give a time frame, otherwise those kinds of silly statements are just nonsense.

If you do define it, then it's a prediction which will undoubtedly be proven wrong.

BTW, you don't have to be religious to believe in end-times, as you yourself are proof thereof. It's a human tendency that has always been around. As I explained, it's a pernicious and subconscious form of self-importance.


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RE: Fukushima

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Mon, Jul 15, 13 at 14:14

That's it, keep dishing out the sugar. Who would not want to respond to that?


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RE: Fukushima

We see a problem and we find a way to fix it. It's just what we do. It's true that some wring their hands and proclaim the sky is falling, but this earth will be around for a long long time. So far, nothing has been unfixable.

So far no one has come up with a satisfactory solution for long-term storage of nuclear waste. As far as fixable, what about the situation at Chernobyl -- has anyone found a cure for radiation poisoning?

Casualties of Chernobyl Nuclear Disaster

Nearly one million people around the world died from exposure to radiation released by the 1986 nuclear disaster at the Chernobyl reactor, finds a new book from the New York Academy of Sciences published today on the 24th anniversary of the meltdown at the Soviet facility.

The book, Chernobyl: Consequences of the Catastrophe for People and the Environment, was compiled by authors Alexey Yablokov of the Center for Russian Environmental Policy in Moscow, and Vassily Nesterenko and Alexey Nesterenko of the Institute of Radiation Safety, in Minsk, Belarus.

The authors examined more than 5,000 published articles and studies, most written in Slavic languages and never before available in English.

The authors said, “For the past 23 years, it has been clear that there is a danger greater than nuclear weapons concealed within nuclear power. Emissions from this one reactor exceeded a hundred-fold the radioactive contamination of the bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki.”

“No citizen of any country can be assured that he or she can be protected from radioactive contamination. One nuclear reactor can pollute half the globe,” they said. “Chernobyl fallout covers the entire Northern Hemisphere.”


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RE: Fukushima

No nancy, but they've found a cure for polio, a vaccine for smallpox. Give them time.


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RE: Fukushima

Give them time.

When speaking of Fukushima, there's no time. The disaster is happening now, and knowledge of the effects of radiation on humans has been known for how many decades?

No answer on the storage of nuclear waste? Because no answer has been found!

The Panglossian platitude - give them time - is a non answer as the effects are disastrous in the here and now.


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RE: Fukushima

As Marshall notes, Fukushima is already affecting his workers, himself, and his crops. There is no time available to change that.

And despite BP's assertions that they are doing everything they can to fix the results of the oll spill, I would not eat a fish from the Gulf on any terms. Things cannot be fixed as conveniently as some would have us believe.


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RE: Fukushima

I'm flying out to see my latest grandchild in August to UCSB.
Traditionally, I treat him and his wife to a Sushi dinner, which we all enjoy. She is breastfeeding my now 4 mo. old granddaughter. I understand dilution rates but don't know what might get in her breast milk.
Should I steer them to a pasta dinner instead?
I'm concerned about what we're handing down to our grandchildren also.
Don, thanks for the links. Very important info.


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RE: Fukushima

nancy, I don't mean to minimize. I've always believed we should have found a way to dispose of nuclear waste before we started building nuclear reactors. We didn't, but I believe that we will.

As far as the oil in the Gulf, I've been eating the seafood for months now. There is always oil in the Gulf. Not of course to the extent of the spill, but it is always naturally occurring. The health dept says the seafood is fine, testing it regularly.


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RE: Fukushima

Pick any metaphor or analogy... it really doesn't matter.

What does matter is finding solutions to the planet's most pressing problems, so there will actually BE a viable planet for future generations...

Those future generations will need to breathe the air, drink the water, and grow or raise a viable food crop.


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RE: Fukushima

Pidge, I am with you. I will not eat or buy for my family any seafood from the Gulf.

Gulf Seafood Deformities Alarm Scientists

New Orleans, LA - “The fishermen have never seen anything like this,” Dr Jim Cowan told Al Jazeera. “And in my 20 years working on red snapper, looking at somewhere between 20 and 30,000 fish, I’ve never seen anything like this either.” Dr Cowan, with Louisiana State University’s Department of Oceanography and CoastalSciences started hearing about fish with sores and lesions from fishermen in November 2010.

Cowan’s findings replicate those of others living along vast areas of the Gulf Coast that have been impacted by BP’s oil and dispersants. Gulf of Mexico fishermen, scientists and seafood processors have told Al Jazeera they are finding disturbing numbers of mutated shrimp, crab and fish that they believe are deformed by chemicals released during BP’s 2010 oil disaster.

Along with collapsing fisheries, signs of malignant impact on the regional ecosystem are ominous: horribly mutated shrimp, fish with oozing sores, underdeveloped blue crabs lacking claws, eyeless crabs and shrimp ��" and interviewees’ fingers point towards BP’s oil pollution disaster as being the cause.

Tracy Kuhns and her husband Mike Roberts, commercial fishers from Barataria, Louisiana, are finding eyeless shrimp. “At the height of the last white shrimp season, in September, one of our friends caught 400 pounds of these,” Kuhns told Al Jazeera while showing a sample of the eyeless shrimp. According to Kuhns, at least 50 per cent of the shrimp caught in that period in Barataria Bay, a popular shrimping area that was heavily impacted by BP’s oil and dispersants, were eyeless. Kuhns added: “Disturbingly, not only do the shrimp lack eyes, they even lack eye sockets.”


“Some shrimpers are catching these out in the open Gulf [of Mexico],” she added, “They are also catching them in Alabama and Mississippi. We are also finding eyeless crabs, crabs with their shells soft instead of hard, full grown crabs that are one-fifth their normal size, clawless crabs, and crabs with shells that don’t have their usual spikes … they look like they’ve been burned off by chemicals.”
...

We also seeing eyeless fish, and fish lacking even eye-sockets, and fish with lesions, fish without covers over their gills, and others with large pink masses hanging off their eyes and gills.” Rooks, who grew up fishing with her parents, said she had never seen such things in these waters, and her seafood catch last year was “ten per cent what it normally is”. “I’ve never seen this,” he said, a statement Al Jazeera heard from every scientist, fisherman, and seafood processor we spoke with about the seafood deformities. Given that the Gulf of Mexico provides more than 40 per cent of all the seafood caught in the continental US, this phenomenon does not bode well for the region, or the country.

More at the link if you can stomach reading it.

/

Here is a link that might be useful: Gulf Seafood Deformities Alarm Scientists


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RE: Fukushima

So Nancy is doing her best to convince Mrs that there is no hope for us. Mankind. Nancy keeps writing that there is no solution for this or for that. Mrs assures her that difficult problems have been solved before. I'm inclined to go for the hope.

This reminds me of the Chicken Little story:

"Chicken Little: "Help! Help!"

Henny Penny: "We're running for our lives!"

Ducky Lucky: "The sky is falling!"

Goosey Loosey: "And we're running to tell the king!"

Turkey Lurkey: "How do you know the sky is falling?"

Chicken Little: "I saw it with my own eyes, and heard it with my own ears, and part of it fell on my head!"

Turkey Lurkey: "Oh dear! I always suspected the sky would fall someday. I'd better run with you."


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RE: Fukushima

From April 2010 to June 2011, more than 8,000 seafood samples ��" including species such as shrimp, oysters, crabs, tuna and swordfish ��" were collected and subjected to rigorous sensory and chemical tests by trained experts. Samples were required to pass both forms of testing before an area was reopened to commercial fishing.

NOAA says that only 0.16 percent of seafood samples failed the sensory testing, most likely because the sampling began after oil had been dispersed from the region. All chemical test results were below the established level of concern. After all waters were reopened, periodic seafood samples continued to be tested to ensure ongoing safety.

All Gulf seafood has been long-declared safe for consumption by NOAA and the FDA, but consumers continue to be skeptical. Immediately following the spill, 70 percent of consumers said they were concerned about the safety of Gulf seafood, according to the Gulf Coast Seafood Coalition.

Nearly three years later, that number is down to 30 percent, but Nelson says the industry still has a long way to go. “The industry will fully recover, but it will take many more years of consumer education, marketing and public relations. [I] expect that this period will last for at least another five years,” he says.

Here is a link that might be useful: link


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RE: Fukushima

So Nancy is doing her best to convince Mrs that there is no hope for us.

You certainly read something that I didn't write. False hopes don't solve a nuclear disaster and you've invented a response that I didn't make.

I'm inclined to go for the hope.

Would that be answer to those exposed to radiation from Fukushima? Proposals for new nuclear power plants - hope we solve the problems with in the next 20 -50 -100 years?


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RE: Fukushima

"Would that be answer to those exposed to radiation from Fukushima? Proposals for new nuclear power plants - hope we solve the problems with in the next 20 -50 -100 years?

As opposed to what? Armchair doom and gloom? Have a little faith.


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RE: Fukushima

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Mon, Jul 15, 13 at 19:05

Here in WA we have a scandal underway or brewing because it has been revealed that - surprise! - officials have been covering up dangerous leakages and other threats to the public welfare over a large area - Hanford is on the Columbia River - for years.

The whole moving into the building and operating of nuclear power plants all over the world was based on an unrealistic assessment of man's ability to use and manage technology. There are some things in this world we can't fix, and radiation is one of those - we crossed a line when we started generating quantities of radioactive waste, with Chernobyl, Fukushima etc. being inevitable tragic outcomes. I may be getting fatal exposure while I sit here on the Pacific Coast, probably farther west than Marshall is, typing this - maybe in so many years a million of us in this area will be riddled with cancer because of Fuk-u-shima.


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RE: Fukushima

Elvis, you have no opinion on the matter of nuclear power plants, radiation and contamination other just have a little faith or hope or ignore the problem.

Yet another scroll-on-by candidate.


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RE: Fukushima

Bboy, my cousin who lives in Seattle was telling us a few months ago about his concerns as well and that they are already noticing an increasing rate of detrimental health effects on many there including newborn babies and thyroid problems.

Mrsk, I am not going to bother getting into a back and forth with you about the Gulf. You are welcome to eat whatever you want to and if you feel that the Gulf is safe to eat then by all means do so.

I choose to get my information from sources other than industry publications like manufacturing.net. Everything I have read over the last few years by scientists and organizations that are studying the area, as late as this past May, continue show they are concerned about the health of the Gulf and the fish/seafood that are coming from there. They still don't know the long term effects. I prefer to err on the side of caution. Everyone is capable of making their own decisions based on what information they glean... to each his own.

I also am disturbed that Alabama has decided to use $100 million of the BP restoration funds to build a new hotel and conference center on the beach instead of using the money for what it is intended..


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RE: Fukushima

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Mon, Jul 15, 13 at 20:39

Most of the world's seafood supply has been fouled at this point anyway - I wouldn't eat any of it whether it was from the Gulf or not. Even the previously sterling Alaskan red salmon supply has been said to have been irradiated by Fukushima. I guess that leaves us with Norwegian cod.

Meanwhile, chain restaurants etc. are pushing all manner of seafood dishes on the television every night, as though nobody has a brain.

Until the increasingly hot and dirty water kills off all the vertebrate marine life. Something that people are seeing with their own eyeballs some places right now - I watched the Maldives episode of Naked and Afraid this week, the two "survivalists" had trouble finding fish because the warming had killed off the coral and therefore most of the fish were gone.

This post was edited by bboy on Mon, Jul 15, 13 at 21:02


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RE: Fukushima

I concur with you, epi--folks can eat what they want and I can choose not to. In fact, I eat much less seafood of any kind these days because so much of it is farm-grown, which is another disaster already well under way. There is one vry good store in DE that I only occasionally can get to but I do buy stuff there. And I have a good friend who brings fish that he has caught himself. But for the most part I avoid the unknown.


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RE: Fukushima

I eat much less seafood of any kind these days because so much of it is farm-grown, which is another disaster already well under way

I agree.. Fish farms are a disaster in their own right and are doing their own damage to our ecosystems. We used to eat more seafood than anything else but for the last few years we have been eating much less. I have a wonderful purveyor who understands our concerns so what I buy from him I trust is being raised ethically and is (relatively) safe. We also get some of our fish from local fisherman (Flounder and Bluefish) and when DH and DS go fishing so we haven't given up on seafood or fish entirely, we just changed how much we consume and where it is from and we avoid frankenfish as best we can.

i also use the EDF/Montery Bay Aquarium/Blue Ocean Institute/FishWise and Seafood Choices Alliance guidelines but even those recommendations I take with a grain of salt lately but they are the best resources at the moment.


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RE: Fukushima

Water and air, the two essential fluids on which all life depends, have become global garbage cans.
Jacques Yves Cousteau

We forget that the water cycle and the life cycle are one.
Jacques Yves Cousteau

The road to the future leads us smack into the wall. We simply ricochet off the alternatives that destiny offers. Our survival is no more than a question of 25, 50 or perhaps 100 years.
Jacques Yves Cousteau

The sea, the great unifier, is man's only hope. Now, as never before, the old phrase has a literal meaning: we are all in the same boat.
Jacques Yves Cousteau

If we go on the way we have, the fault is our greed and if we are not willing to change, we will disappear from the face of the globe, to be replaced by the insect.
Jacques Yves Cousteau

Mankind has probably done more damage to the Earth in the 20th century than in all of previous human history.
Jacques Yves Cousteau

When you enter the ocean, you enter the food chain, and not necessarily at the top.
Jacques Yves Cousteau

“Man has always assumed that he was more intelligent than dolphins because he had achieved so much...the wheel, New York, wars and so on...while all the dolphins had ever done was muck about in the water having a good time. But conversely, the dolphins had always believed that they were far more intelligent than man...for precisely the same reason.”
Douglas Adams


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RE: Fukushima

Good ones, Don. Been following your similar postings on FB.


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RE: Fukushima

Thanks Marshall, awareness is rare.


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RE: Fukushima

I follow you on FB, too, Don. You are often the wake-up call I need.

Back to water: when my son and grandson were through-hiking the Appalachian Trail, the most crucial aspect of the hike was getting potable water. They sometimes found spring water or streams clear enough that they could treat the water and drink it. But often what they came across was not usable and this was in supposed "wilderness." That's just part of the larger degradation of the planet that goes on around us every day. My son is a former commercial fisherman who has written books about the death of the fishing industry in New England and the environmental/economic/human costs of farm fishing.

I have little hope for the environment if this country continues as it has and if too many folks depend on "hope" rather than the hard work it would take to alter our course.


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RE: Fukushima

Just to keep it somewhat real, we don't in fact know what is responsible for Marshall's anecdotal observations.

I think I have observed far fewer insect pollinators this year; is it so, or is it my observation colored by suggestion? If it is so, is the cause linked to CCD or is it quite unrelated? Someone else mentioned fewer observed songbirds in the mid-atlantic. I observe greatly more songbirds in the past few years. Is it an extremely local phenomenon, in each or either case, or part of a larger shift? We don't know.


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RE: Fukushima

The link below gives some of the reasons an results of living on the planet as though it can sustain its self in spite of us. We have to look at the whole picture and how all of the things we do affect the planet and interact with themselves. The addition turns into multiplication and results in enhanced problems as they combine. Makes it harder to see the real results when the attack comes from so many directions.

"The primary cause of environmental degradation is human disturbance. The degree of the environmental impact varies with the cause, the habitat, and the plants and animals that inhabit it."

Here is a link that might be useful: Causes of Environmental Degradation


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RE: Fukushima

Very apropos, Don, thank you... Jacques Cousteau saw the greed and ruination, and made mention of it before even I.

I concur with Epi... we steer clear of any fish or seafood originating from the Gulf... and, in fact, eat little to no seafood from anywhere else... farmed items included. As far as we're concerned, it's simply not safe.

Humankind is killing the only means of survival he has as a species... and has been on the path to destruction for a long time.

It can be put into any words one likes... we are destroying our planet... and for what?


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RE: Fukushima

Most of the world's seafood supply has been fouled at this point anyway - I wouldn't eat any of it whether it was from the Gulf or not.

I agree too. You can count on less than one hand the number of times I eat seafood or fish of any kind in a year. Some years I do not eat any. Although I do take fish oil and eat seaweed.

I read that all fresh water fish in the US is contaminated with mercury, no matter how rural the waterway. That ocean fish is also contaminated with mercury, the higher up on the food chain, the greater the level of contamination. Shrimp and lobster are bottom feeders, and if radiation, oil and other fish excrement aren't bad enough, humans have dumped who knows what garbage into the oceans that they may be contaminating their food sources. Perhaps leaking containers of nuclear waste!


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RE: Fukushima

There are also many oil spills all over the world that never make the news. Someone mentioned fish from around Norway, there have been large spills there too.

Then notice in the list below that Exon Valdez was in 1989 and there is still oil being cleaned up there. It is not so simple as the oil companies would like you to think. They also are using the same technology to try to clean up the large spills that they used when the previous spill happened in the gulf of the coast of Mexico in 1979.

Here is a link that might be useful: List of oil spills


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RE: Fukushima

As well as being polluted, the ocean has most of the planet's nutrients.


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RE: Fukushima

Healthy oceans are essential to a healthy planet and healthy species of life on that planet... something we have been sadly neglecting.


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RE: Fukushima

We have not just neglected the ocean, Jodi, we have actively pursued policies that are contaminating it. I thought it was shocking when Fukushima imploded that one solution was dumping so much of the radioactive waste straight into the Pacific Ocean. And Japan is a nation that relies heavily on fish as a major food source. I can't imagine what those people are ingesting every day.


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RE: Fukushima

And another one at the link -

We have reported extensively on the highly radioactive “black stuff” being found around eastern Japan, as far away as Tokyo. Citizens initially found the substance, usually concentrated in gutters and low spots. Some superficial analysis had been done on the substance, again by citizens. The government has refused to acknowledge the issue or do any publicly acknowledged testing of the substance.

Marco Kalofan, an environmental engineer in the US was able to obtain a sample for detailed analysis. What was found was quite unusual. The substance isn’t a sand but an aggregate of radioactive substances, metals and rare earth materials. The materials for some reason clumped together into an aggregate rather than dispersing as tiny particles.

What the detailed analysis showed was that the material may have come from inside failed fuel assemblies from the damaged reactors. The high level of uranium daughter isotopes like radium 226 are seen as an indicator of amounts of unburned uranium fuel. The sample also has a mix of other substances like cesium 134 & 137 and cobalt 60 that are reactor emissions as they do not exist in nature. The specific combination of substances found and the aggregate nature of the pieces confirm it is not organic in nature. The sample also contains a number of things expected to be found in used nuclear fuel.

snip

Swell

Here is a link that might be useful: link


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RE: Fukushima

I can imagine what's being ingested... I read an article not that long ago that dealt with some of the many pollutants that have been dumped, the amount of trash that has been disposed of, and what reactions it all has as a ground up chemical soup that reaches our beaches, that fish and other species of life swim in and eat other forms of life within it...

It's a giant mess. And I can't imagine a country thinking that more dumping... especially of such a toxic type... was a viable solution.


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RE: Fukushima

First, What is FB?

Has anyone else noticed the pro-nuclear noise that has been coming from folks like Steward Brand and Bill Gates with his involvement with the start-up company "Terra Power"?

I'm not sure I should have mentioned them in the same sentence as I have a completely different opinion of the two.

Concerning nuclear power and other uses of radio-active material, I think, for better or worse, I align myself more with someone like Dr. Helen Caldicott. I just think her positions are more logical and reasonable- even when she speaks passionately.

I seem to have only disdain now, for Mr. Brand, who I remember fondly for the 'Whole Earth Catalog'.

But Mr. Gate's, Stanford University's and Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Lab's interest in small reactors that use depleted fuel intrigues me somewhat.

I still think that creating electric power is all about centralized private profits, that home solar or wind power plants (particularly off the gird ones) are a threat to those profits..

Still, here's a snip from Wiki about these new 'traveling wave reactors'

"The new reactors could reduce the amount of nuclear waste by using existing stockpiles of depleted uranium as fuel. "By extracting centuries' worth of energy from waste at enrichment plants, these reactors would turn a social and financial liability into an asset," said Gilleland. TerraPower says there are 700 000 metric tons of spent fuel in the U.S. alone, and 8 metric tons could power 2.5 million homes for a year.[10]
Some reports say that the high fuel efficiency of TWRs combined with the ability to use uranium recovered from river or sea water, enough fuel is available to generate electricity for 10 billion people at U.S. per capita levels for million-year time-scales"


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RE: Fukushima

FB = Facebook


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RE: Fukushima

  • Posted by vgkg 7-Va Tidewater (My Page) on
    Wed, Jul 17, 13 at 16:59

On top of everything else we're probably on the verge of waking up Godzilla again.


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RE: Fukushima

People forget that Japan and the Japanese experienced two nuclear bombs and the radioactive aftermath and so have a much better grasp of the dangers than most Americans borne after 1960.


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RE: Fukushima

Did anybody besides us Chicago schoolkids have to take the iodine tablets to ward off the effects of the drift from the bomb test sites out west?

Duck & cover, duck & cover; such a catchy tune.


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RE: Fukushima

Yes - mandatory for us in Wisconsin during the 50's. We all lined up every Friday for the chocolaty aspirin sized pill to protect our thyroids, which I guess is the most susceptible to excessive radiation possibly blowing in from the West. The rest of our organs could turn to blackened masses as we huddled under desks to protect our heads from anything falling from the ceiling in an attack. (Like asbestos)


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RE: Fukushima

How old are you Elvis? That video was made in 1951.


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RE: Fukushima

I do know that, Marshall, but tht only makes it more strange that they would not guard more carefully against what happened. Also, the bombs happened 70 years ago--who knows how differently current generations understand that event and act on its repercussions.


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RE: Fukushima

"The link below gives some of the reasons an results of living on the planet as though it can sustain its self in spite of us"

True. It can't survive forever with the way we treat it.

Eat, drink what you like. It's the air you breathe that will likely get you. Can't avoid that.

It's not the years in the life, it's the life in the years.
So, live it up.


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RE: Fukushima

Pidge, our governments at the time and during the aftermath, went to some efforts to minimize the extent of deaths and illnesses associated with the two bombings. Incidences of radiation sickness declined in part because those two bombs were low-yield air bursts while the Fukushima event involves meltdown of fuel rods and release of cooling fluids that will continue for years perhaps.


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RE: Fukushima

"Shunichi Tanaka, the head of the Nuclear Regulation Authority in Japan, and the country’s chief nuclear regulator announced on Wednesday, that the nuclear power plant at Fukushima, has been leaking contaminated water into the ocean for the two years since the accident that saw three of the plants six reactors suffer a meltdown."

Here is a link that might be useful: We Have A Little Leak, Folks...


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RE: Fukushima

Thanks for the further info, Marshall.


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RE: Fukushima

Hmm. Reading this, especially Marshall's account of changes he has seen, and epi's account of increased thyroid problems in Seattle (I live 10 miles west of Seattle across Puget Sound) got me thinking. Just a week ago I got a call from my doctor's office saying I was to see him ASAP. Turns out that a nodule on my thyroid, which has been there since 2006 and tested by ultrasound every year, has significantly enlarged. I am to see an endocrinologist and it will probably mean a surgical biopsy (I had a fine needle biopsy in 2006) and possibly cancer. When I asked the doc why this could have enlarged and what causes it, he responded by saying that excessive radiation usually causes thyroid problems and that a lot of people (more than a normal percentage), exposed to the nuclear waste and radiation from the Hanford (WA) nuclear plant have thyroid problems and cancer. I said I had never, to my knowledge, been near Hanford nor any abnormal amounts of radiation but this has made me wonder. I intend to ask my endocrinologist about it. Not that anything can be done about the cause, at this point (except moving east but that's not an option).


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RE: Fukushima

I sincerely hope everything works out good for you, Dockside... in a benign way. :-)

I don't know that it will have much effect, but we use iodine as a regular supplement in our routine. Just regular old 2% tincture of iodine. The body takes what it needs and discards the rest. Although, I think it a good idea to ensure that iodine use won't present a problem to an individual, prior to using it... as in being sure one's systems can adequately process any supplements.

Given our planet's various systems and how air and water currents flow, it's not impossible that radiation from one location will spread to other locations, affecting life.


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RE: Fukushima

You may already have linked to this website, don, but worth taking a look at. I don't think tht some of this can be "fixed."

Here is a link that might be useful: Fukushima news


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RE: Fukushima

Pidge, thank you for the link.

I don't think tht some of this can be "fixed."

Here's some happy news from the site:

June 4th, 2013 / Government officials held a meeting in Tamura-city in Fukushima prefecture to explain to residents that they need to look after themselves from now on. Originally they were aiming to reduce the level of contamination down to 0.23uSv/h (=added ionizing radiation 1mSv/y).

However they have now abandoned this aim and are not going to repeat any more decontamination. The officials have suggested to residents that it’s ok to live there even if the level of radiation doesn’t go down below 0.23uSv/h as long as they monitor their exposure level by wearing the dosimeter and manage to live carefully inside their house so as not to be exposed to more than 0.23uSv/h.


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RE: Fukushima

Frank: "How old are you Elvis? That video was made in 1951."

Is that when it was made? Huh. Time flies. I wasn't around then. I was however, one of the wee ones doin' the drill during the Cuban Missile Crisis, when the video was apparently VERY popular.


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RE: Fukushima

Dockside, last year my primary Nurse Practitioner looked a my ex-rays and saw nodes so ordered the ultrasound and then the needle biopsy. The nodes were 7mm and 3mm and the needle biopsy made them swell.and goiter. Had to wait a month for them to take the whole thyroid out with the swelling and pain. On Synthrex now till forever so new baggage for me. The lab report came back benign so no problems there. Never knew or even bothered me before they found them.


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RE: Fukushima

Bummer dude! You sure have had a run of health problems. My body seems to be riddled with benign cysts, nodes, bumps, lumps (including retinas and spine). I have refused offers to remove some of these and passed on needle biopsies. Stubborn I am, yes.


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RE: Fukushima

In case anyone still thinks we can "fix" the damage humans have done to this planet, here's a wake-up call pointing to impending disaster.

Here is a link that might be useful: Fukushima news


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RE: Fukushima

Yes Pidge, we continue with our busy lives while the unseen, no smell strange substance that permeates all it touches is carried into the water and atmosphere around us. The results will show up in increments as the exposure is according to what and where we are and what we consume. Then we will realize, too late, that there is no fixing the problem and resign ourselves to the suffering it brings. Are there studies currently running on the possible increase in the awful results of this or is there an interest in knowing?


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RE: Fukushima

Don, I don't think there is an interest in knowing because the implications of this disaster are simply too scary for most people. When a poster sits back and says we are "fixing" things so there is no reason to concern ourselves about the hideous future we all face, it's clear to me that too many people are simply indifferent to what's happening because they don't think its affecting them. For decades, no one paid any attention to the danger of asbestos--but my electrician father died of mesothelioma (sp) as a result of what industry kept secret. I don't know what studies are being done concerning Fukushima, but I can't imagine that the nuclear plant industry is any more eager to discuss the dangers than BP is to own up to the damage done to the Gulf area. Their ads--"our commitment has never been stronger"--are enough to gag a goat.


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RE: Fukushima

"And can you leave out the word greed? Our food is safer than it's ever been, our drinking water is safer than it's ever been. "
There is no way I can believe this statement. As far as the drinking water goes most cities have it "medicated" with flouride and there is no filtration system to take out pharmaceuticals that are in the water. I know - so let's take it from the ground? Too bad it is being contaminated through fracking and farming practices. And food - it's said to be "not harmful" not safe.

"Mankind has probably done more damage to the Earth in the 20th century than in all of previous human history.
Jacques Yves Cousteau "
This quote I find very disturbing and bothersome.

As far as everyone's ailments go - I hope things work out well for you. Unfortunately our environment probably takes a toll on all our health.


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RE: Fukushima

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Thu, Jul 25, 13 at 13:07

This little whoopsie could make everything else pale into insignificance for a lot of people. Nothing like viciously miserable terminal medical problems to kill your interest in other things. I watched my dad die of prostate cancer and my mother lived in institutions for two months with half a brain due to a stroke - until I was advised to let her go and she suffocated to death.

A college friend's wife already has thryroid problems thanks to Chernobyl, they live here so now I am wondering about her. People had to commit suicide-by-radiation exposure in order to shut that one down. What happened to the Japanese code of honor? It's like nobody over there is taking any responsibility.

This post was edited by bboy on Thu, Jul 25, 13 at 13:10


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RE: Fukushima

Speaking of Chernobyl: I had a student years ago who had been walking home from school when Chernobyl blew so was exposed to heavy doses of radiation. When I met her, her grandmother was already sick with cancer. I have often wondered what happened to my student. Of course I don't know but I doubt it could have been good. I think of her every time there's a nuclear event of any kind.


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RE: Fukushima

we continue with our busy lives while the unseen, no smell strange substance that permeates all it touches is carried into the water and atmosphere around us.

At least we have San Onofre shut down -- not particularly because it was the most prudent action but prohibitive repair costs convinced SoCal Edison to call it quits.

SoCal Edison Officially Retires San Onofre Nuke Plant Operating License

Southern California Edison (SCE) would like the world to know that all the radioactive fuel has been removed from the doomed San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station's Unit 2 reactor...

On Tuesday, SCE, which is the majority owner of the troubled plant, sent a letter to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) officially alerting them that the fuel had been removed, following a similar letter sent regarding the Unit 3 reactor on June 28. Once the letter has been processed by the NRC, the company will no longer possess an operating license for SONGS, but rather only a "possession" license.


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RE: Fukushima

Then there is this oil derivative mess for the radiation to infiltrate that is absorbed and eaten by plankton and every thing above plankton in the food chain. Also much of this stuff is found in the digestive systems of birds and all other life in and around the ocean from microscopic particles to whole containers. And there are 4 other major gyres to collect the mess. So we end up with crude oil, refined oil substances, oil products and chemicals used to "clean up" all radiated and running around in the The global ocean conveyor belt

Great Pacific garbage patch

"The size of the patch is unknown, as large items readily visible from a boat deck are uncommon. Most debris consists of small plastic particles suspended at or just below the surface, making it impossible to detect by aircraft or satellite. Instead, the size of the patch is determined by sampling. Estimates of size range from 700,000 square kilometres (270,000 sq mi) to more than 15,000,000 square kilometres (5,800,000 sq mi) (0.41% to 8.1% of the size of the Pacific Ocean), or, in some media reports, up to "twice the size of the continental United States".[20] Such estimates, however, are conjectural given the complexities of sampling and the need to assess findings against other areas. Further, although the size of the patch is determined by a higher-than-normal degree of concentration of pelagic debris, there is no standard for determining the boundary between "normal" and "elevated" levels of pollutants to provide a firm estimate of the affected area.

Net-based surveys are less subjective than direct observations but are limited regarding the area that can be sampled (net apertures 1�"2 m and ships typically have to slow down to deploy nets, requiring dedicated ship's time). The plastic debris sampled is determined by net mesh size, with similar mesh sizes required to make meaningful comparisons among studies. Floating debris typically is sampled with a neuston or manta trawl net lined with 0.33 mm mesh. Given the very high level of spatial clumping in marine litter, large numbers of net tows are required to adequately characterize the average abundance of litter at sea. Long-term changes in plastic meso-litter have been reported using surface net tows: in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre in 1999, plastic abundance was 335 000 items/km2 and 5.1 kg/km2, roughly an order of magnitude greater than samples collected in the 1980s. Similar dramatic increases in plastic debris have been reported off Japan. However, caution is needed in interpreting such findings, because of the problems of extreme spatial heterogeneity, and the need to compare samples from equivalent water masses, which is to say that, if an examination of the same parcel of water a week apart is conducted, an order of magnitude change in plastic concentration could be observed.[21]"

 photo 350px-North_Pacific_Gyre_World_Map.png

"The patch is located within the North Pacific Gyre, one of the five major oceanic gyres."


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RE: Fukushima

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RE: Fukushima

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Tue, Aug 6, 13 at 21:48

It was just a matter of time before all this building of not-always-top-of-the-line reactors all over the place was going to start producing these Hellish situations. Nuclear technology is way out there on the danger scale, not to be handled with conventional approaches and mindsets - or you have things like this happen. Many people probably really don't know what is going on over there, if the blank looks I sometimes get are an indication. Meanwhile the seafood ads are still all over the place - I can't even get my girlfriend to stop chowing down on the shrimp (she has apparently never paid any attention to which kinds were considered suitable for consumption and which weren't - before Fukushima got in the news) - and salmon (in WA you are not supposed to eat local salmon more than once per month, due to PCBs. And now there is the radiation in the Pacific).


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RE: Fukushima

I don't think anyone really knows what to do about the situation, or if there's anything that can be done once the radioactive water is in the Pacific; certainly we're not prepared on the West Coast to deal with the ramifications of the radioactive leaks.


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RE: Fukushima

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Tue, Aug 6, 13 at 22:05

When our surf boards start glowing it will make night surfing easier. Being hairless will be an improvement also, we'll be able to move through the water like seals.


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RE: Fukushima

Perfect shark bait.


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RE: Fukushima

Stay out of the sun, the whiter the skin the less likely a shark will go for you.


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RE: Fukushima

Well, unless I run into a landshark, I think I'm generally safe... we don't live anywhere near an ocean or large body of brackish water necessary for sharks' existence.


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RE: Fukushima

I was reading this today, the latest on Fukushima.

Some we have read before and some we haven't.

Japan's nuclear watchdog has now declared the leak of radioactive water from Fukushima a "state of emergency." Each day, 300 tons of radioactive water seeps into the ocean, and it's now clear that TEPCO has engage in a two-and-a-half-year cover-up of immense magnitude.

"I believe it's been leaking into the ocean from the start of the crisis two-and-a-half years ago," disclosed a 12-year TEPCO veteran named Suzuki-san (SOURCE)

"There are still reactor buildings we haven't gotten into yet," said another worker named Fujimoto-san. "So there's always the possibility of another explosion..."

Just how out of control is the situation at Fukushima? It's so out of control that TEPCO recently had to admit 10 of its workers were somehow -- yeah, see if you can figure this out -- sprayed with highly radioactive water while waiting for a bus.

"The workers' exposure above the neck was found to be as much as 10 becquerels per square centimeter," reports Bloomberg.com

How exactly did highly radioactive water manage to find its way to a bus stop in the first place? TEPCO isn't sure. It's confusing with all those radiation alarms going off all the time. In order to concentrate, the company has found it's easier to just disable all the alarms and pretend nothing's wrong.

The TEPCO cover-up
To fully grasp the extent of the TEPCO denial, realize that only recently did the company finally admit that radioactive groundwater has been leaking into the ocean. This follows years of stark denials from the company, whose executes have exhibited a remarkable ability to deny reality even when their own workers are dying in droves from cancer.

It's no exaggeration to say that TEPCO's downplaying of the full extent of the Fukushima disaster has put tens of millions of lives at risk -- people who should have been warned about radiation but were denied that information due to the TEPCO cover-up.

"At this current time in July of 2013, Fukushima is 80 to 100x more expansive and more intense -- letting out about 100x more of the radiation of Chernobyl," reports Dr. Simon Atkins Phoenix Rising Radio on a BlogTalkRadio interview.

"The problem with Fukushima is that it's not only continuing for 865 days... I mean, let's wrap our minds around that for a second -- it has been leaking out radiation in increasing volumes for 865 days."

The U.S. government, of course, plays along with the charade because its own top weapons manufacturer -- General Electric -- designed and built the Fukushima Daiichi power plant in the first place. And the design decisions made by GE, such as storing spent fuel rods in large pools high above the ground, now look not just incompetent but downright idiotic. It turns out there was never any long-term plan to dispose of the spent fuel rods. The idea was to just let them build up over time until someone else inherited the problem.

So while Japan and the USA play this game of "let's all pretend nothing happened," citizens of both countries continue to be exposed to a relentless wave of deadly radiation that now dwarfs the total radiation release of Chernobyl (which the U.S. media played up in a huge way because the disaster made the Russians look incompetent).

The only reason TEPCO is finally getting around to admitting the truth in all this is because you can't rig all the Geiger counters forever. Radiation follows the laws of physics and atomic decay, not the whims of lying politicians and bureaucrats. As a result, the real story eventually comes out as we're starting to see right now.

The upshot is that the Fukushima disaster is not only far worse than you've been told; it's very likely going to be worse than you could ever imagine. The radiation leak isn't plugged, in other words, and another explosion -- which many experts believe might be imminent -- would release thousands of times more nuclear material into the open environment.

Here is a link that might be useful: link


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RE: Fukushima

"What do you do on a normal day?

Regardless of what you do on a typical day, go to school, work, or stay home, in each case you are being exposed to radiation. Whether you know it or not you are being exposed to radioactivity everyday of your life."

Here is a link that might be useful: Everyday Radiation


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RE: Fukushima

The U.S. government, of course, plays along with the charade because its own top weapons manufacturer -- General Electric -- designed and built the Fukushima Daiichi power plant in the first place.

Old news but worth repeating: There are 23 nuclear power plants operating in the U.S. using the same General Electric Mark 1 reactors as the Fukushima Dai-ichi plant.

As to the revelations of the massive leaking of radioactive waters, we're in uncharted waters (absolutely no pun intended) regarding damage to the ocean and marine life.


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RE: Fukushima

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Wed, Aug 14, 13 at 20:20

I think because of astronomically dangerous incompetence of those in charge both here and in Japan people in affected areas are just going to die, same as with Chernobyl - and the rest of humanity will carry on - same as with Chernobyl - with the Russian disaster merely being the start of a series of such staggeringly serious calamities.

I asked my GP about it and she said it wasn't time to do anything like take iodine because we haven't been told to.


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RE: Fukushima

This paragraph caught my attention...

"At this current time in July of 2013, Fukushima is 80 to 100x more expansive and more intense -- letting out about 100x more of the radiation of Chernobyl," reports Dr. Simon Atkins Phoenix Rising Radio on a BlogTalkRadio interview.

Chernobyl Exclusion Zone

"The Exclusion Zone covers an area of approximately 2,600 km2[7] in Ukraine immediately surrounding the Chernobyl nuclear power plant where radioactive contamination from fallout is highest and public access and inhabitation are restricted. Other areas of compulsory resettlement and voluntary relocation which are not part of the restricted exclusion zone exist in the surrounding areas and throughout Ukraine.[8]"

2,600 km2 x 100 = 260,000km2 being of course mostly water in our direction that moves around in many ways. Makes for interesting possibilities.


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RE: Fukushima

I am worried about which crops have a tendency to concentrate radioactive particles. We are known for the great diversity of crops grown and distributed to personal and public kitchens


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RE: Fukushima

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Wed, Aug 14, 13 at 21:01

The site epi linked to says they test their own products for radiation.


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RE: Fukushima

Old news but worth repeating: There are 23 nuclear power plants operating in the U.S. using the same General Electric Mark 1 reactors as the Fukushima Dai-ichi plant.

Indeed.

Some people think that this is only Japan's problem, which it isn't, or as we see from the above post, not a problem at all.

Don, this as well

Reuters: Corrosion is weakening Unit No. 4 at Fukushima ��" Concern quake to ‘topple’ bulging structure ��" “May have tilted” ��" Holds 14,000 Hiroshima bombs worth of cesium-137

Title: Insight: After disaster, the deadliest part of Japan’s nuclear clean-up
Source: Reuters
Author: Aaron Sheldrick and Antoni Slodkowski
Date: Aug 14, 2013

[...] “If you calculate the amount of cesium 137 in the pool, the amount is equivalent to 14,000 Hiroshima atomic bombs,” said Hiroaki Koide, assistant professor at Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute. [...]

Tepco has shored up the building, which may have tilted and was bulging after the explosion, a source of global concern that has been raised in the U.S. Congress.

The utility says the building can withstand shaking similar to the quake in 2011 [...] but the company has a credibility problem. [...]

Corrosion from the salt water will have also weakened the building and equipment, [Murray Jennex, an associate professor at San Diego State University who is an expert on nuclear containment and worked at the San Onofre nuclear plant in California] said.

And if an another strong earthquake strikes before the fuel is fully removed that topples the building or punctures the pool and allow the water to drain, a spent fuel fire releasing more radiation than during the initial disaster is possible, threatening about Tokyo 200 kilometers (125 miles) away.

.Bboy, a friend in Washington state told me she was advised by a homeopathic practicioner to use a blend of medicinal mushrooms that help the body deal with the radiation by buiding up the immune system This is what she was recommended

Vitacost Mushroom Ultra-10 Complex Description

I don't know anyhing about them so I am not advocating or promoting their use, just passing on the info. You will have to look into them to see if they are applicable to you or others.

The site epi linked to says they test their own products for radiation
Indeed and give a link P.S. We test everything at the Natural News Store for radiation. "Click here to read how we do it".

Here is a link that might be useful: link


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RE: Fukushima

I just saw something in the news the other day that said Fukushima is leaking an ungodly amount of radioactive water into the ocean daily. I can't recall the exact number the story stated, but it sounded alarming.

And we have aging nuclear plants here...


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RE: Fukushima

Bad internal link, Epi, to the testing of food products.


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RE: Fukushima

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Thu, Aug 15, 13 at 13:45

I e-mailed out links to the page about the current and future awful situation epi linked to here and got no responses. Maybe the 10 Fukushima workers sprayed with highly radioactive material from the neck up while waiting for a bus should have had their heads in the sand, along with the rest of us.

Not that I am making a crusade out of it but I have found I can refer to "Fukushima" in in-person conversation and even at this point there is a good chance the other party will have no frame of reference for the term.


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RE: Fukushima

Bboy, isn't that a kind of sushi rich in rare nutrients?


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RE: Fukushima

Bad internal link, Epi, to the testing of food products.

Marshall, email them and let them know you were unable to access their link and ask their assistance. I would think they would be open and able to help you get the information you are looking for.

Bboy, few people on the east coast are taking an interest in this or are concerned about it. It seems that few think it is their problem. I know about it because a few friends and relatives on the west coast are very interested, discuss it and I am on their email list when they share information.


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RE: Fukushima

  • Posted by vgkg 7-Va Tidewater (My Page) on
    Thu, Aug 15, 13 at 17:48

You Were Warned....

...as an east coaster I'm starting to worry.


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RE: Fukushima

few people on the east coast are taking an interest in this or are concerned about it.

A number of those GE Fukushima-type reactors are in the Northeast.


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RE: Fukushima

Epi, the clean link to the testing protocol is below. This is the gist:

"Why it's hard to make most foods radioactive
It turns out that foods do not easily "hold" radiation except in rare circumstances. For plants to become radioactive, they would have to absorb radioactive elements such as cesium and iodine isotopes which are not normally found in nature. The mere act of exposing food to radiation does not automatically make that food "radioactive" in the same way that microwaving your food does not turn your food into a microwave emitter.

Another way to explain this is that even though sunlight is a form of radiation, holding foods under sunlight does not make them emit sunlight themselves. (They don't turn into powerful light sources.)

I have seen some people post videos where they are waving a dosimeter (Geiger counter) over some foods and freaking out when they get audible "hits," but what they aren't telling you is that they are detecting normal background radiation that you're getting 24/7, everywhere on the planet. For example, as I'm writing this, I've got my Radiation Alert Inspector device clicking away, showing 0.008 microsieverts per hour, which is completely normal. Sometimes it even just up to 0.015. Scientifically speaking, the only way to know whether a food material is actually emitting radiation is to compare it to background radiation which requires a "timer" function, as radioactive decay is a truly random subatomic event.

The mere act of taking a flight on an airplane would cause my dosimeter to seemingly go crazy with audible hits due to the vastly increased level of radiation experienced at high altitude.

Foods can only become radioactive if they absorb radioactive elements
Some foods, such as bananas, may naturally absorb a higher level of cesium isotopes (such as Cs137) but only if radioactive cesium is readily available in the soil. This is only because cesium tends to mimic the biological pathways of potassium. It has nothing inherent to bananas themselves. Any food that absorbs potassium (including sweet potatoes) would absorb radioactive cesium if it were present in the soil.

The funny thing about all this is that I have been trying to find an example of a high-radiation food so that we could demonstrate it on an upcoming episode that I'm filming with GAIAM TV, but I have been having a very difficult time even finding radioactive food. Perhaps I need to broaden my search, but so far nothing is showing up as radioactive beyond normal background levels.

From my research, the far greater threat from Fukushima is from inhaling radioactive dust particles that get lodged in your lungs and irradiate you from inside your own body... for life! The respiratory tract is a far greater threat that the digestive tract for another reason, too: the digestive tract is designed to eliminate all substances within 2-3 days. But the respiratory tract can easily trap particles where they may never come out. (This is why even healthy human lungs actually turn brown over the years. They are collecting large amounts of particulate matter and storing them.)"

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/041611_radiation_testing_Natural_News_Store_Fukushima.html#ixzz2c4xvVhbT

Here is a link that might be useful: How we test for radiation


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RE: Fukushima

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Thu, Aug 15, 13 at 19:27

>For plants to become radioactive, they would have to absorb radioactive elements such as cesium and iodine isotopes which are not normally found in nature<

But what's normally found in the soil in nature is not what the current threat is - as is discussed in the subsequent paragraph about a possible inhalation hazard.

Godzilla indeed, we are not talking about a mere natural disaster that conventional approaches can cope with. The people - on both sides of the Pacific - that are supposed to be protecting everyone else are dropping the ball on this. Especially the bungling Japanese, who are now acting like they were never qualified to operate such dangerous technology. Under-built reactors from American corporation + Japanese corporation in charge of operation + placement in natural hazard zone = millions of potential deaths.

Meanwhile people want to put corporations in charge of everything over here.


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RE: Fukushima

Marshall, I know little about testing foods for radiation and at the moment I have no intention of doing so. The link you posted was at the bottom of article on the site I linked to above. I though the link was dead, per your post which is why I suggested you contact them, that's all.


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RE: Fukushima

Epi, I wasn't directing the content of the link at you but generally. I was already aware that the danger to humans was inhalation, short of direct Beta and Gamma radiation. I'm telling my customers to wash their produce and fruit coming from us, a practice they should follow anyway.

Back in the 1960's I was a research assistant on a then secret bit of research on effects of a strongly radioactive pellet on surrounding vegetation. This was on a DoE site in the Poconos. To access the site for assessing effects of radiation, we remotely lowered the device into a lead-sheathed tube which itself was then lowered into an underground vault. Other researchers came at other times to apply experimental treatments to counter our reported visual and lab-tested damages. The damage was so pronounced and appeared so soon that the research was shut down (or so claimed.) I carried my Geiger counter with me for years.

I won't live in some areas where radon gas accumulates, such as my childhood homes in New England on granite, gneiss and schist. Also I have received way more radiation from mri's, mra's, dental x-rays chest and other x-rays, and a couple of months working on x-ray crystallography of minerals and other basic inorganic and organic materials.


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RE: Fukushima

A nuclear expert has told the BBC that he believes the current water leaks at Fukushima are much worse than the authorities have stated.

Mycle Schneider is an independent consultant who has previously advised the French and German governments.

He says water is leaking out all over the site and there are no accurate figures for radiation levels.

Meanwhile the chairman of Japan's nuclear authority said that he feared there would be further leaks.

The ongoing problems at the Fukushima plant increased in recent days when the Tokyo Electric Power Company (Tepco) admitted that around 300 tonnes of highly radioactive water had leaked from a storage tank on the site.

The Japanese nuclear energy watchdog raised the incident level from one to three on the international scale that measures the severity of atomic accidents.

This was an acknowledgement that the power station was in its greatest crisis since the reactors melted down after the tsunami in 2011.

But some nuclear experts are concerned that the problem is a good deal worse than either Tepco or the Japanese government are willing to admit.

They are worried about the enormous quantities of water, used to cool the reactor cores, which are now being stored on site.

Some 1,000 tanks have been built to hold the water. But these are believed to be at around 85% of their capacity and every day an extra 400 tonnes of water are being added.

"The quantities of water they are dealing with are absolutely gigantic," said Mycle Schneider, who has consulted widely for a variety of organisations and countries on nuclear issues.

"What is the worse is the water leakage everywhere else - not just from the tanks. It is leaking out from the basements, it is leaking out from the cracks all over the place. Nobody can measure that.

Here is a link that might be useful: Yikes


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RE: Fukushima

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Thu, Aug 22, 13 at 21:17

I really don't like the idea of finding out I'm being fatally irradiated - or being forced to abandon my property - because the Japanese and American governments were too timid, the private companies involved too crooked - to do what is needed to finally and effectively shut down this giant festering blister of death soup.


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RE: Fukushima

  • Posted by vgkg 7-Va Tidewater (My Page) on
    Fri, Aug 23, 13 at 9:42

It sounds like Japan has a perpetual rad/water accumulation problem that will never end until the island nation is covered with leaky storage tanks, and then what? Do they have a long term plan to deal with it or is it impossible to solve other than constantly hosing down a fire that can not be put out?


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RE: Fukushima

bboy - well stated!


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RE: Fukushima

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RE: Fukushima

One article says: "Marine scientist Buesseler believes that the leaks pose little threat to Americans, however. Radioactive contamination, he says, quickly is reduced "by many orders of magnitude" after it moves just a few miles from the original source, so that by the time it would reach the U.S. coast, the levels would be extremely low."

Another says: "Last year, scientists from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory and 3 scientists from the GEOMAR Research Center for Marine Geosciences showed that radiation on the West Coast of North America could end up being 10 times higher than in Japan"

I'm confused. Not sure that they really know what's going to happen?


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RE: Fukushima

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Mon, Aug 26, 13 at 2:42

If I'm reading them right your first paragraph is from one guy who, frankly sounds like an idiot by saying that radiation just disappears after a few miles of travel - and the second is from a consensus multiple American government marine scientists.


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RE: Fukushima

Cost to insure Tepco’s debt soars on back of bad news

The Asia-Pacific Journal, Vol. 11, Issue 34, No. 1, August 19, 2013.
Abe’s Nuclear Energy Policy and Japan’s Future
Long but much important information.

Kashiwazaki-Kariwa Nuclear Power Plant This is the plant they want to restart.

"It was the largest nuclear generating station in the world by net electrical power rating."

"2007 : It was approximately 15 miles from the epicenter of the second strongest earthquake to ever occur at a nuclear plant, the Mw 6.6 July 2007 Chūetsu offshore earthquake. This shook the plant beyond design basis and initiated an extended shutdown for inspection, which indicated that greater earthquake-proofing was needed before operation could be resumed. The plant was completely shut down for 21 months following the earthquake."

Edited to add interesting reading...
The 10 Biggest Nuclear Reactors

This post was edited by don_socal on Mon, Aug 26, 13 at 4:07


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RE: Fukushima

"Trace radiation from the Fukushima nuclear disaster is showing up in Pacific bluefin tuna. By measuring that radiation, scientists are gaining valuable insight about the fish's early migratory habits."

Here is a link that might be useful: Stanford scientist uses Fukushima radiation to reveal swimming secrets of Pacific bluefin tuna


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RE: Fukushima

  • Posted by vgkg 7-Va Tidewater (My Page) on
    Tue, Aug 27, 13 at 17:45

There's always a silver lining....knowing where our sushi swims.
Another plus will be when the tuna rads reach a level to kill all the parasites and harmful bacteria..


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RE: Fukushima

On a different but related note today marks the 27th anniversary of the Chernobyl disaster. Scientists say it won’t be safe for 20,000 years. What an earth we are leaving for our children, grandchildren,... :(


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RE: Fukushima

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Tue, Aug 27, 13 at 23:08

We are leaving effectively perpetual radioactive hellholes that in the case of this latest one are not even being contained and kept as a hole.

And of course the size of the Chernobyl death toll is due to the radiation spreading also.


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RE: Fukushima

"AUG 28, 2013
The latest reports out of Japan about the leaks in the damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant are extremely troubling. On Wednesday, Japan's Nuclear Regulation Authority officially raised its assessment of the latest leaks at Fukushima to level three ��" the highest warning given to any incident at the plant since the three reactor meltdowns in March 2011 ��" labelling it a "serious incident" on the International Nuclear and Radiological Event Scale for the first time. The Nuclear Regulation Authority made a provisional upgrade last week; it then consulted with the U.N.'s International Atomic Energy Agency, which prompted the official announcement.

It's been almost 2 and a half years since a massive tsunami and earthquake hit Japan, but just last week, Tokyo Electric Power discovered that 300 metric tons of water was leaking from a storage tank and seeping into the ground. Upon further inspection, officials discovered a surge in radioactive levels at the bottom of two storage tanks at the facility. Nuclear Regulatory Authority inspectors reported the tanks were emitting radioactive levels at 100 millisieverts per hour and 70 millisieverts per hour, respectively. "One hundred millisieverts per hour is equivalent to the limit for accumulated exposure over five years for nuclear workers; so it can be said that we found a radiation level strong enough to give someone a five-year dose of radiation within one hour," Masayuki Ono, general manager of Tepco, told Reuters last week. But TEPCO's regular inspectors in charge of monitoring the tanks didn't report any changes in the water levels of the tanks, though, so there was some confusion.

Today, the Associated Press reports:

On Wednesday, regulatory officials said TEPCO has repeatedly ignored their instructions to improve their patrolling procedures to reduce the risk of overlooking leakages. They said TEPCO lacked expertise and also underestimated potential impact of the leak because underground water is shallower around the tank than the company initially told regulators.
The upshot of all this? The problems at Fukushima aren't going away anytime soon. "What's important is not the number itself but to give a basic idea about the extent of the problem," Nuclear Regulatory Authority chairman Shunichi Tanaka told reporters last night, while downplaying the severity of the situation: "I've seen reports that this is a dire situation but that's not true." Tanaka explained the biggest problem facing Fukushima is the "massive amounts of contaminated ground water reaching the sea," according to the AP. The only problem: they don't know how much is escaping, how radioactive it is, or what effect it is having on the local ecosystem. Tanaka also chastised TEPCO for its continued inept handling of every leak and crisis at the plant. "I'm baffled," he said.

This isn't the first time TEPCO has been accused of mishandling leaks, either. It's been a common criticism lobbed at the company, especially this summer, when two other major leaks were already discovered. Japan's industry minister, Toshimitsu Motegi, compared TEPCO's handling of the recurring leaks to playing "whack-a-mole" while announcing the government would play an increased role policing TEPCO's leak clean up."

Here is a link that might be useful: Latest Fukushima Leaks Prompt Grim Assessment from Nuclear Agencies


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RE: Fukushima

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Tue, Sep 3, 13 at 18:14

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RE: Fukushima

The disaster that keeps on giving.

The operator of the leaking Fukushima nuclear plant said Tuesday that it dumped more than 1,000 tons of polluted water into the sea after a typhoon raked the facility.

Typhoon Man-yi smashed into Japan on Monday, bringing with it heavy rain that caused flooding in some parts of the country, including the ancient city of Kyoto.

The rain also lashed near the broken plant run by Tokyo Electric Power (TEPCO), swamping enclosure walls around clusters of water tanks containing toxic water that was used to cool broken reactors.

Some of the tanks were earlier found to be leaking contaminated water.

"Workers measured the radioactive levels of the water collected in the enclosure walls, pumping it back into tanks when the levels were high," said a TEPCO official.

"Once finding it was mostly rain water they released it from the enclosure, because there is a limit on how much water we can store."

The utility said about 1,130 tons of water with low levels of radiation -- below the 30 becquerels of strontium per litre safety limit imposed by Japanese authorities -- were released into the ground.


But the company also said at one site where water was found contaminated beyond the safety limit workers could not start the water pump quick enough in the torrential rain, and toxic water had leaked from the enclosure for several minutes.

Strontium is a potentially cancer-causing substance that accumulates in bones if consumed.

Thousands of tonnes of water that was poured on the reactors to tame meltdowns is being stored in temporary tanks at the plant, and TEPCO has so far revealed no clear plan for it.

The problem has been worsened by leaks in some of those tanks that are believed to have seeped into groundwater and run out to sea.

Separately, around 300 tonnes of mildly contaminated groundwater is entering the ocean every day having passed under the reactors, TEPCO says.

Here is a link that might be useful: link


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RE: Fukushima

I am impressed with the willingness of the Japanese and its Pacific Rim near and far neighbors to allow ocean dumping of coolant waters as long as the water continues to be available and not more radioactive than the allowable for cooling water. Of course we can expect the maximum allowable threshold for each isotope to continue to be elevated, thereby assuring the population that standing and falling water and dust are no danger to health. Sure.


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RE: Fukushima

I hear you, Marshall. I feel badly for you West Coast folk. No way I'll buy anything from that part of the country now. Ever (not knowingly, anyway).

I feel so impotent. The Fukushima event is just horrible; the worst thing that has happened in a very long time, IMO.


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RE: Fukushima

What/Elvis! don't you want to glow in the dark of winter there in northern Wisconsin?

For a time we are protected by upwelling cold waters from on deep and counter currents moving north and west from the tropics. The gyre of contaminated currents lies away from the coast. I am more concerned with radioactive particles embedded in rainfall from storms generated over the northern Pacifica Ocean. Of course with this continuing drought, who know when we will get any rain.


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RE: Fukushima

My husband and I both need to go back to the doctor/lab for needle aspirations for our thyroids. We both have thyroid nodules.

We live on the Oregon coast.

Lynn


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RE: Fukushima

I hope everything checks out okay, Lynn. My best wishes for both of you.


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RE: Fukushima

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Wed, Sep 18, 13 at 2:33

Yes: the rain comes from the ocean, so why won't it be raining radiation on all areas receiving Pacific storms at some point? What's to be done about that, except just dieing, like in Ukraine?


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RE: Fukushima

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Sat, Nov 9, 13 at 20:41

Recent alarming comments from David Suzuki.

Here is a link that might be useful: Fukushima Warning


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RE: Fukushima

From the link:
"David Suzuki warns that Japan could be wiped out and that North America's west coast could be forced to evacuate if the Fukushima nuclear facility falls in an earthquake. .David Suzuki has issued a scary warning about Japan's Fukushima nuclear plant, saying that if it falls in a future earthquake, it's "bye bye Japan" and the entire west coast of North America should be evacuated."

I hope to heck he's wrong. Seems to me it's not a Japan problem; it's a world problem.

Puts in perspective the questions of who's got the money, who has health insurance, who is more right or more wrong, etc etc.


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RE: Fukushima

Suzuki also says:

"Three out of the four plants were destroyed in the earthquake and in the tsunami. The fourth one has been so badly damaged that the fear is, if there's another earthquake of a seven or above that, that building will go and then all hell breaks loose.

"And the probability of a seven or above earthquake in the next three years is over 95 per cent."

Over 95%??? Sounds like another earthquake and meltdown of 4th reactor are almost a sure thing! I think Fukushima may be a ticking time bomb.


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RE: Fukushima

Is there any sort of international team to inspect these nuclear plants? Inspect plans for future plants?

Seems odd a plant was built whereearthquakes and tsunamis are possible.


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RE: Fukushima

october , doesnt America have them built in california near the S A F ?


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RE: Fukushima

Yes, there is at least one plant built on the San Andreas fault.

As the start date or this thread indicates, Don in socal was on to this months ago, as was Marshall, and in response to a thread about climate change, we were treated to some bleating by a few posters about how we shouldnt worry because it was being "fixed."

But once the genie is out of the bottle, there is no putting it
back. The warning sirens have been blaring for a long time now, and I am not optimistic that humans can survive. Nature will recover on its own through thousands of years of time--it doesn't give a rat's ass about humans--but I don't think we will.


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RE: Fukushima

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Sun, Nov 10, 13 at 21:45

I wonder how many of the one million and counting Chernobyl victims went about their business as though nothing different had happened - until it killed them - just like all the people here who are continuing to take their children down to the beach to play in the water and sand (if it's above 50 degrees F here it's shorts weather) and so on.

Nevermind that Puget Sound already had an PCB problem.

If you search the internet for "west coast radiation levels" all kinds of stuff comes up, it's not like there are no signs that we are already being exposed (unless numerous web sites are all making it up): seals losing their hair and laying about on the beach, invertebrates turning to jelly, no marine life being spotted from ships between Japan and Hawaii...

Supposedly there is a raft of radioactive crap the size of California on its way here, with Hawaii the current port of call.


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RE: Fukushima

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Mon, Nov 11, 13 at 16:15

Friday Nov. 1:

TEPCO also has appointed a former U.S. regulator who led the cleanup of the 1979 Three Mile Island nuclear accident in the United States as an adviser

Here is a link that might be useful: Japanese utility, US Department of Energy to co-operate in Fukushima nuclear plant cleanup


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RE: Fukushima

"cleanup" is a rather absurd term, I think. This stuff is here to stay and we will pay a very large price for it.


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RE: Fukushima

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Mon, Nov 11, 13 at 17:10

Maybe they're talking about bodies.


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RE: Fukushima

That's possible, bboy.

I had a student something like 20 years ago who told me tht she was walking down the street in Ukraine when Chernobyl blew. Her grandmother was already seriously ill with cancer. I continue to wonder if my student made it through.


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RE: Fukushima

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Wed, Nov 13, 13 at 22:13

TOKYO (Reuters) - The operator of Japan's crippled Fukushima nuclear plant will as early as this week begin removing 400 tonnes of highly irradiated spent fuel in a hugely delicate and unprecedented operation fraught with risk

Here is a link that might be useful: Now for the Tough Part


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RE: Fukushima

I found myself holding my breath while reading at the link.


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RE: Fukushima

I don't want to sound gloomy but I can't help contrasting this whole scenario with "On the Beach" by Nevil Shute.


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RE: Fukushima

only a matter of time


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RE: Fukushima

Saw a news story last nite about 95% of starfish on the California coast have died (and many more dying all the way up to Alaska). The poor little things are losing their legs, just falling off. Heart wrenching.

They claim they have no idea why it's happening. Then, at the end of the story, get this, they said they don't know how much worse it will get. Jeez. It can only get to 100%, no?

I wondered if it is due to fukushima poisoning.


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RE: Fukushima

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Thu, Nov 14, 13 at 14:34

I checked the web site of the state department of health and it claims there isn't any radiation here.

To which I will add "yet".

It also says not to touch anything from Japan that appears on the beach.

Especially if it is marked as being radioactive!

Friend's mother who vacations in Hawaii every Feb. still plans to go over there next year. He said people there are being told to stay away from the beach!!


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RE: Fukushima

This certainly doesn't sound good, but I note that this is affecting a certain species in some locations; also that it's being called a "wasting disease," so who knows where it came from. Now, if a geiger counter held over a pile of dead starfish starts clicking madly...

"...It has killed up to 95% of a particular species of sea star in some tide pools.

Starfish, or sea stars, are marine invertebrates that come in a variety of colours & sizes.

Many scientists believe those affected are dying from “sea star wasting disease”, a syndrome that spreads quickly & causes tissue decay."

Here is a link that might be useful: A Starfish Species is Dying


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RE: Fukushima

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Thu, Nov 14, 13 at 21:27

If you look around on the web even a little you soon find there is lots of talk about similar occurrences with other marine life, which is being blamed on Fukushima. Whether this stuff now is really all connected to the ongoing Japanese disaster or not, the important thing is that the situation at the plant is an ongoing disaster, with the worst perhaps yet to come.


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RE: Fukushima

From what I am reading, bboy, I completely agree with you. I'm very happy that I don't live near the west coast, and worry about my loved ones who do live there.


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RE: Fukushima

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RE: Fukushima

  • Posted by bboy USDA 8 Sunset 5 WA (My Page) on
    Fri, Dec 13, 13 at 22:38

The only thing that sinks faster than this thread is the melted down Japanese reactors.


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RE: Fukushima

I feel totally powerless in the face of deteriorating nuclear systems in Japan. Reminds of of Neville Shutes' ON THE BEACH, both the book and the film. A quick recap: the unthinkable happens and an exchange of nuclear bombs and missiles devaste two world powers in the northern hemisphere, the fall out dooming all exposed. The survivors live in the Southern Hemisphere where they await the arrive of the radioactive fallout,

Well, I make my living outside on the Pacific Coast in the path of radionuleid fall out from Fukushima and I am not a happy fella.


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RE: Fukushima

Lest we forget, it is very likely too late. Read and weep...

Japan’s New ‘Fukushima Fascism’ Comments are interesting.

Fukushima news, articles and information:

Fukushima nuclear disaster

300k Fukushima refugees still living 'in cages' in makeshift camps

Fukushima Update
Nuclear News from Japan

The Lotto of a Fukushima-style Nuclear Disaster

Japan to spend $970mn on storing radioactive Fukushima soil

After Meltdown, Nine Months Of Drift For Fukushima Survivors

Fukushima--beyond urgent Video 10+ minutes

First time I post any where in 6 months and it glitches. Have not followed any of the chatter here or elsewhere as I have not been some one even I would want to be around. A bit better lately but still not up to speed. Carry on.

This post was edited by don_socal on Sun, Dec 15, 13 at 11:15


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