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Regional Language

Posted by sylviatexas z8a Tx (My Page) on
Wed, Nov 13, 13 at 14:27

The thread about language skills made me think of modern & old-time regional quirks.

My Granny would say things like,
"Be smart & be pretty."
sounds odd today, but I understood her.

She & some of her contemporaries also said things like,
"well, I swan", which I stll don't understand.

A guy from England told me that I was being "very English" when I talked about my Granny;
he said most Americans use "Grandma" or some such, while the English say "Granny" for the paternal grandmother & "Nana" or "Nan" for the maternal grandmother.

I once met a guy at a party who said things like
"I taken & moved the wagon to the other side of the barn" &
"I taken & put up the groceries".

I had heard "I taken &..." before, but not since my childhood, when the old people in the Scottish branch of the family used that phrase.

I asked the guy if he had any Scottish ancestors in his family tree, & he looked startled & avoided me for the rest of the evening.

turned out his name was McAllister & he was hiding from an ex-wife.

My brother laughed about asking his Pennsylvania-born girlfriend for some peanut butter & being flabbergasted when she told him, "It's all."

Here, we would have said, "It's all gone" if the jar was empty.

anybody else remember phrases like these?


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Regional Language

I have heard older new england speakers say "this after" for "this afternoon".


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RE: Regional Language

That reminds me of something that may be a Texasism:

"about dark, dark-thirty" (when twilight ends & it's dark outside, maybe until a half-hour after dark)


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RE: Regional Language

"dark-thirty", I like it - very nuanced.

Another new-englandism is "bring with".


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It took me years to figure out where my officemate got his phrase from. He says "Like said" not "like I said". He has Muslim names, but he's from Scotland? I've only heard it one other place, and that was in a fully Saudi Arabian interview. It was Saudis interviewing Saudis. Maybe he's spent time there? With his Muslim name and having been to Mecca, makes sense! He's always the one who pops in my mind when it comes to phrases because it took me so long to hear it elsewhere.

When I first moved to the SouthEast I heard "Can I carry you to __________". It meant, give me a lift (in the car), but I was fully confused!!! Another one is fixin'. It is used for most anything (it means "about to"), but fixin' to fax was my favorite for the longest time. No one faxes any more.


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Regionalisms are kind of interesting. I really don't know where this comes from, but I had an uber-boss who didn't make use of "to be"... project needs done, clothes need washed. Must be fairly common as I see it written quite often in threads on the "other side" of the GW forums.


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RE: Regional Language

Is dark-thirty the same as beer-thirty?


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It's all is still very common here in PA...meaning all gone. I still say it, I think. My grandmother used to say outen the lights. I think that translated from the German but it's never heard here anymore. Unless the Amish say it.

I briefly lived in northern PA and someone asked if I had gotten my order. Clueless... until she meant getting your groceries for the week.


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No way! Beer thirty can happen in broad daylight, no dark required.


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When I was 8, we moved from OR to NC. It took us a while to figure out that "Tuesday week" really meant a week from Tuesday, that if a child is "just a mess" that is not actually a bad thing and if they asked you about slaw with your barbecue, you had to specify that you wanted it on the side and not on the sandwich.


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RE: Regional Language

We had a switch plate cover that said "outen the light" when I was growing up. I wonder what happened to it.

Rob, the "carry" thing still bothers me. When someone asks me if they can carry me somewhere, I envision them picking me up in their arms and carrying me.

I've never heard just plain dark thirty. DH has used zero dark thirty for years to indicate a time before dawn.

I grew up pronouncing aunt the same way I would ant. Around here, people pronounce it as ont.


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There are so many phrases I grew up with, it's hard to remember them all but some stick out more than others.

"Now we've run around this bush before." (There will be no further discussion about the matter.)

"Don't look a gift horse in the mouth." (Be grateful.)

"You make the bed you lay in." (Make good choices.)

"Be careful what you wish for because you might just get it."

"You are pulling my leg." (Kidding or lying.)

"She just likes to hear herself talk." (Loud mouth)

"There is going to be war in the camp!" (Better behave and I mean right now!)

"You need to pull yourself up by the boot straps." (When things weren't going well or something happened.)

"Get off your high horse." "You are getting too big for your britches ." (Both phrases used to humble someone.)

"Those two were cut from the same cloth."

"You are barking up the wrong tree." (Blaming the wrong person.)

"It's fast." (Stuck.)


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My grandfather's generation always said "down yonder" to indicate a location. If he was feeling especially talkative, it was "down yonder a piece."

I grew up pronouncing aunt the same way I would ont. Around here, people pronounce it as ant. (Talk about strange reversals!).

Where I grew up in S. Dakota, that strip of grass in front of the house out by the street was called a boulevard. Can't ever remember what they call it here in Kansas, but it definitely isn't boulevard. Had some strange conversations about the city wanting to dig up my "boulevard" when they considered it a non-boulevard.

Kate


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RE: Regional Language

Another PA saying example..She's all over jam...meaning she has jam on her face.


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Nothing to report here... except for the typical Chicago accent my Dad was known for... you know the hard pronunciation... deez, doze, and dem... instead of these, those, and them.


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In some parts, people call the boulevard grass strip a "hell strip".


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EDD said his Kentucky family occasionally used I swan as a form of astonishment.


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I heard some regionalisms when visiting in-laws in central New York. The phrase "up to" was inserted when places mentioned, as in "I'm going up to Wegmans" even if Wegmans were due south of the speaker. DH never used the phrase and said his mother taught him not to as it was a "country" way of speaking; they were from the town (the cosmopolitan metropolis of Corning, NY). Once we were in the Adirondacks trying to locate a resort where DH had worked the summer after graduating high school. He was told that it was now a school for the deaf -- pronounced deef. It was an alternate local pronunciation.

The phrase "gully washer" had a way of working itself into any conversation about weather.



I was raised with some regional foreign language phrases. (Maybe jerzee can add some to mine.)

O ti mangi questa minestra o ti butti dalla finestra!
Either eat this soup or jump out the window - perhaps the Italian version of "take a flying leap."

I remember my brother being called mammalucco -- more teasing and less insulting than stupido and seemingly reserved for males. (I was called out in English - fussbudget.)

Caino -- literally Cain (perhaps a Biblical reference) -- was used for the instigator of a sibling fight, and trying to shift the blame; usually used for the mammalucco brother, and one of my father's brothers. (You mean my uncle did that when he was little? Gasp!)

There was another word - a variant of mucosa, mucus - used to describe the snotty-nosed boy across the street. I wish I could remember it now.


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My MIL is found of the term "run ragged." I wonder if she would continue to use the term if she realized it refers to a hen that has been overworked by a rooster.


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"I swan" was old when Adam was a boy - and that latter expression I've only heard someone say once - on prince edward island.

It was 'ont' for me as well; in my wife's family it's 'onty'. In Mayberry apparently it was 'aint'. When I was a kid all grandparents were 'gramma' and 'grandad' or 'daddy-so-and-so'. Hence my g-grandfather was daddy-bill. Teachers and other figures of respect were 'mister' followed by the first name.


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From the Canadian west coast - we pronounce it ant, we have boulevards and golddust I grew up with most of those sayings.

If we're going to the east coast we say "we're going back east" I always laugh when I hear easterners say that they're going out west. We probably have a lot of other regional idioms and colloquialisms but as a 3rd generation west coast Canadian I have nothing to compare them against. They're just ingrained in my conversation.

I did say to my sons one day (handed down by my father) when they were teens and I was really mad at them " You're up s*** creek without a paddle" .They laughed so hard it lost it's intent.


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'Is dark-thirty the same as beer-thirty?'

Rob sort of beat me to it, but the answer is...
it depends.
In the summer, when it's light until 8 PM or so, definitely not!
Beer-thirty happens about 4:30 or so.

Which reminds me that my father & his cousin, who both went to work very early & got off around 3:30 if I remember correctly, would sometimes get together after work & wait for the "4:30 breeze" to signal that it was time for a beer.

Joe, that's it! an expression of astonishment!
"She wore a white wedding dress!"
"Well I swan!"

We grew up calling our aunts 'ant' or 'aint'.


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I always thought "I swan" was a corruption of I swear.


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sounds reasonable.

Words & phrases get garbled as they get passed down, just like that old game of "gossip" that we used to play at slumber parties.
***************************

I once heard a funny story from the same English guy who commented about 'granny'.

He was to give an aptitude test to 30 or 40 truck drivers who wanted a promotion.

When they were all seated, he said,

"Good morning.
Please check the desk in front of you to be sure you have all the materials you'll need.
You should have
a test booklet,
an answer sheet,
a sheet of scratch paper,
2 pencils,
& a rubber."

Every one of his students fell on the floor laughing.


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youns-yous guys-- Pittsburgh-means you all or you guys. wife says things like' my clothes are all over cat hair', The car is all over snow; I would say' there is cat hair all over my clothes.
some of the backwards families use 'haint' instead of 'aint , either in place of are not or is not, or can not or will not..
I heard some blacks taling the other day, I swear, I couldn't make out 3-4 words, but they were kickin= havin a good time.


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Was it dark-thirty, FF?


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Zero dark thirty is 12:30 am in my circles.

I drink some pop when I want a carbonated beverage. Others might drink a coke (lower case c) or a soda.

I've been spending a lot of time in Canada lately. "No worries" is the Toronto way of saying No big deal, Don't sweat it.

And then in Minnesota we have "ish". That translates to gross, yuk, disgusting. That is the goofiest regional word I've ever heard.


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jodi: "Nothing to report here... except for the typical Chicago accent my Dad was known for... you know the hard pronunciation... deez, doze, and dem... instead of these, those, and them."

I'm not sure there is a "typical" Chicago accent. I was born & raised there, and didn't know anyone who spoke like that.

We say shiCAWgoe and CLAWzet rather than chiKAHgoe & KLAHzet. I've heart both "Chicago" & "closet" pronounced both ways...by Chicagoans. Different part of Chicago, maybe, or our respective parents simply spoke differently.

goldust, I use all those expressions you listed, except the last one.

sylvia: "Joe, that's it! an expression of astonishment!
"She wore a white wedding dress!"
"Well I swan!"

Right; it means "I declare!," "What a surprise!," and like that.


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no pn, it was about 15 bells.


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RE:consarnit!

I just remembered that word. There was a family up the road that used to use that word. Consarnit, I caint git this thing figgered fer the life a me!! They were dirt poor, dirty, didn't have much money but they were good folk that were able to fix about anything. I never saw anybody go off to a job from there?? I think they all just hustled a buck wherever and whenever?


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Posted by sylviatexas z8a Tx (My Page) on
Wed, Nov 13, 13 at 15:02

That reminds me of something that may be a Texasism:

"about dark, dark-thirty" (when twilight ends & it's dark outside, maybe until a half-hour after dark)

*

Oh yes, Dark Thirty. Generally thirty minutes after dark, but it depends on whether it is the summer or winter, its different.

You just know and it's very common to say, "come over about dark thirty" or I'll be leaving the house at dark thirty."

"Stove up" is one I recall old people saying which I sometimes use and older people understand, meaning one is stiff or sore, generally from hard physical work or weather and arthritis changes, or both.

"Rode hard and put up wet" refers to generally a woman, one that looks like she got all dressed up to go out to bars, messed around a lot and got home in the wee hours, not just for one night but as a habit for years and years.

"Road map face"--person with lots of deep wrinkles.
"Apple doll face"--person with leather dried skin.

"White on rice"--all over it.

"Wear you out"---spanking, beating, switching, as in, "I'm going to wear you out, boy!"

"That's too much sugar for a dime"--more trouble than it's worth.

"She could sit on a grave and hatch haints."-- so unattractive well, self explanatory. Often used when someone rings the doorbell and you have a towel on your wet hair and in a robe, "you caught me hatching haints."

This post was edited by demifloyd on Thu, Nov 14, 13 at 8:38


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Elvis - I also grew up in Chicago, spent a total of 25 years in the heart of the city, and also never heard dem, deez, etc. I associate a Chicago accent, if there is such a thing, with flat, broad vowels. You and I compared notes a while back and discovered that our neighborhoods were close to each other.

I enjoyed your "Shikawgoe". I agree! "Shikahgoe" sounds funny!

I had an uncle-in-law who was born and educated in England and spoke the Queen's English. During the fifties he came with his family to live in Michigan, where he'd been offered an interesting engineering job. One day he was in a gas station having his car filled and tended. As they were chatting, the attendant asked him where he was from "England, London," he replied. "Yeah," said the guy. "I thought you spoke kinda broken."


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Hatch haints.....well, I'll be.


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It was 'Glory be' in my world.


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I think they are a different meaning, gold. "i'll be" is of course short for "I'll be whatever" (impressed, surprised, confused, etc). Pretty old-fashioned now, but one can still hear it in the south.

"Glory be" has religion all over it. Holy-rollers.

For those who want to listen to at-length speeches (and fascinating ones, at that) from fairly recent speakers of now rare dialects, check out Vernon, Fla by Errol Morris from 1980.


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My favorite is "he is as full of s--- as a Christmas turkey."

I grew up in Georgia and often heard "I swan". We also heard "carry me to school, the store, the whatever" instead of drive. that's an old southernism. Also is "down yonder" which I heard throughout my childhood.

When I lived in NW PA I often heard "those clothes needs washed" or "that dog needs fed, etc." Sounded a bit strange to me. Also heard it in Ohio.

I lived in W. VA for 3 years and was amazed at the creative speech I encountered. e.g. "It don't make no never mind." (I don't care).


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sable said:
You and I compared notes a while back and discovered that our neighborhoods were close to each other.

Where did they go now? :-)
I hope the stories of racial fear and terror that both of you have posted here on numerous occasions are not all that you remember about this great city.

As far as regional language, Chicago is in the middle of the country and has been a real melting pot for well over 100 years. Other parts of the country in the South and the East seem to have retained more of a signature to their local dialect (at least IMO, as a lifelong Chicagoan).


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Brown, you may be right. My Aunt used the term when she was astounded. My family descended from Amish and Holy Rollers. Eventually they created me; a Humanist.


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I have never ever heard I swan. Where are people saying this? KY, TX, GA. Did i get that right? Maybe it's an "older person" saying. Not related to regions because I live in the heart, also known as smack dab in the middle, of those states and not heard it. Hm. Ever. I've spent quite a bit of time in both KY and GA too.


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My mother was stuffed with sayings but my favorite is my grannie's. She would call something a 'financial mess'. I have no idea where she got it and I don't remember anyone else ever using it. She would also say you were acting like a spotted ape. That's what I love about the deep south-you can just see it.


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Rob, yes, it was from the older generation that I heard "I swan" when I was a child.

I also like "the apple doesn't fall far from the tree." ( when the offspring turns out badly as the parents).

As for "ont" vs. "ant." I lived in VA over 40 years. The Tidewater accent is unique in several ways, but many old-time folk from Richmond use the "ont" pronunciation. They also say "oot" for "out" and "hoose" for "house." The latter accents are dying out now, however.


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Elvis and Jodik - I thought about the question of dem, deez, etc. being typical Chicago speech and realized that, in certain areas of the city, it is. For example - Da Bears! For another - Da Mare. This was what many people, especially reporters, called Mayor Richard J. Daley (the first Mayor Daley), because it was how he often referred to himself.

The Daley family was from the Bridgeport neighborhood, which was in the near South Side and RJD lived there his entire life. Bridgeport had its own *patois*, which included the famous "d"s. My parents grew up not far from Bridgeport, but did not have this speech pattern.

Anyway, I was mistaken and I apologize. I'd forgotten the many-flavored speech patterns that exist side by side in this very diverse city! Da Mare is long gone, but here's to Da Bears...


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And "bears" would have to be pronounced like bearce.

SNL's recurring skit, "Bill Swerski's Superfans" kept that alive.

Can't think of much that would be typically Minnesotan - we do tend to drop a final "g" on some (but not all) words... goin' to the store, etc. comes to mind.


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Sable, maybe it's also a thing particular to certain neighborhoods or different eras... my Dad grew up on the south side during the Depression.


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I don't think it's "oot", it's "owt" just like the typical canadian pronunciation. I read that the Tidewater is the only other dialect that has that. The narrator (and creator) of the tv show the Waltons is the best-known example.


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Jodik - My folks grew up on the edge of the South Side neighborhood known as the Back of the Yards, so named because it was indeed just behind the huge Chicago stockyards (which no longer exist). On hot summer days the stench from the stockyards permeated a large part of Chicago. One just lived and breathed through it. Anyway, I believe that you have mentioned that you are of Czech descent. So am I. The Back of the Yards was originally populated by a lot of people who came from Slavic areas in Europe. My maternal gpa was from Moravia and my maternal gma was from Bohemia.

It's definitely a neighborhood thing!


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Sable, back in the day my Dad belonged to a "street gang", leather jacket wearing, hubcap stealing "gang"... they consisted of several nationalities including Polish, Armenian, Italian, Irish, Czech, and a few others... these guys grew up together and remained friends for life. Their neighborhoods were all rather close together, and they all spoke with this rather "hard" Chicago accent, is the only way I can describe it... everyone who ever met him would say, "you're from Chicago, aren't you?"

I don't know... I think it's probably part neighborhood, and part the times they grew up in. I don't generally hear Chicagoans speak quite the same way today.

I lived on the south side for a short while, myself... and all I could smell, depending on which way the wind was blowing on a given day, was the Argo plant... or the sewage treatment plant. What a choice. ;-)


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My family used the term "the apple doesn't fall far from the tree" with the same meaning as stated above. Another term my Mother used when she was really tired was "I feel like I was sent for and couldn't go."


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Posted by jodik 5 (My Page) on
Thu, Nov 14, 13 at 20:47

Sable, back in the day my Dad belonged to a "street gang", leather jacket wearing, hubcap stealing "gang"... they consisted of several nationalities including Polish, Armenian, Italian, Irish, Czech, and a few others... these guys grew up together and remained friends for life. Their neighborhoods were all rather close together, and they all spoke with this rather "hard" Chicago accent, is the only way I can describe it... everyone who ever met him would say, "you're from Chicago, aren't you?"

*

Speaking of stealing, my dad had a Mercury convertible and when he worked days and attended business school at night, when a was a baby, his fender skirts were stolen while he was at night school. He saved up and replaced them, and they were stolen again.

The third set they tried to steal remained on the car, however.
Dad had soldered straight edged razor blades up under them, all that was left was some blood, but those thieves didn't mess with his car anymore.

It's curious--he grew up in such a rough neighborhood it's a wonder he wasn't the one out stealing from people instead of being personally responsible and trying to do better for his family.

One term that I have passed on that I think I made up because I've never heard anyone else use it, is, "It's time to give this a good leaving alone."

I use it when becoming obsessed with cleaning something, with working in the yard, or when I've given all the effort something is worth.


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This is a fun thread! I'm from central VA. Born and raised here. I had two female relatives. One I pronounced Ain't and the other Ont! Go figure. I swan meant I swear because it was not proper to even imply that you were swearing. I also say out almost with an r sound.


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"I swan meant I swear because it was not proper to even imply that you were swearing."

I wondered about that. "I swan" sounds like "I swearin'" to me (with a southern accent).

"I also say out almost with an r sound." Now that puzzles me. Why would there be an "r" sound in "out?"


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I didn't go through the entire thread, but if no one else has commented, "I swan" is short for "I swannee". My mother used to say this phrase.

Here is a link that might be useful: Vanishing American: More Southernisms......


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Huh. Looking at the link, I remember Grandma saying "sody" (SOdee) for soda or pop. Also, "I reckon" and "down yonder." She was from Quincy, Illinois.


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Reckon and down yonder I am familiar with, both are common in the south.

He's tighter than Dick's hat band.

Also "fillin" station for gas station.


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  • Posted by ohiomom 3rdrockfromthesun (My Page) on
    Fri, Nov 15, 13 at 8:43

Daddy's language was "colorful" ... these are a few things I remember him saying, sure there are more.

don't have a pot to piss in or a window to throw it out of

colder than a witch's tit

don't know his ass from a hole in the ground

cold as a well digger's ass in January

And when he would get upset with us he would say "I am going to cloud up and rain all over you"

I say pop not soda ... for years we called a refrigerator an "ice box" (because we actually had one) until the kids teased me and I made the effort to say refrigerator.

Also my cousins would say "going uptown" and we said "going downtown".

Got lost in the hills one day with my cousin, everyone we saw and asked for directions told us "just up yonder on that hill" ... ummmmm there is nothing but hills and how far is yonder? :)

Fillin station ... yep


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Colder than a witch's tit was a favorite in our family too. It would be interesting for someone to do some research and find which of these expressions are common in all english-speaking regions and which are rare.


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My other recent favorite is saying "Jumped the Shark". Try explaining that one (I may be repeating myself) to a person from the Netherlands. They don't even have the point of reference. What is a Fonzie? HA! That was certainly a funny discussion I heard among the Fellows (yes, capital F).

public domain picture

Here is a link that might be useful: Jumping the shark


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When I first moved to Louisiana it was a tough adjustment. When someone would say, "run by my house later"...well, what they actually meant was, stop by and visit. Going to Schwegmanns to "make groceries", was to go grocery shopping. "Build a gumbo" I understand that one. Earl for oil, zinc for sink.

My early childhood was in Kentucky. I swanee and for pities sake, are the two that stuck in my mind.


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A good southern friend of mine taught me a couple of useful regionalisms.

He sticks to something like "white on rice" meaning dogged, even past reason.

Ya'all means you and all ya'all means all of you.

And my personal favorite "Bless his little heart" which usually means that mean little bas......


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Well, Demi, my Dad was the eldest of 6 children, and felt responsible for helping to feed his siblings during those hard economic times... those few hubcaps turned in to the junk man, and the bottles they collected, bought bread and other necessities for the family to eat.

"I feel like I was sent for and couldn't go."

I've never heard that one... but we say "I feel like I was rode hard and put away wet!"... though, that has a slightly risque' connotation!


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Why bless your little heart, when said with a very southern accent...well, you know you've just been told something really bad.


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"It's time to give this a good leaving alone."

I love it!

I also like:
"Not my circus, not my monkeys."

"Sody pop" reminded me of my Aunt Leone & her daughter, my cousin Charlotte.

Aunt Leone was pure country from East Texas, & she never ended a word with "ow".

Pillow became piller.
Window was winder.
etc.

Her daughter Charlotte had been to college & had become a school teacher;
Charlotte wore stockings & high heels & suits & make-up even when she came home to Aunt Leone's little tin-roofed house in the country.

& Charlotte eeenunciated every "ow" waay past its normal sound.

Pillow became something close to pilleau.
She'd suggest opening the windeau.

One summer evening when we had been visiting & were on our way home, my father told my mother that he had been waiting all afternoon for a spider to come along so he could hear Charlotte say, "Eek! a spideau!"


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." Also, "I reckon" and "down yonder." She was from Quincy, Illinois."

Well, I reckon she was from somewhere else then before she moved to Quincy. I have never heard anyone say any of those phrases before, and I am from Quincy. I am not saying that she did not say those words. I am just questioning if she was originally from Quincy. My grandparents never used those phrases and they were born and bred in Mt. Sterling (a farrr more hick area about 40 miles away).


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My grandmother who said "I reckon" and "down yonder" grew up in southern Illinois--I always figured that is where she got those phrases.

Kate


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I worked with a woman in a hospital years ago. She was from England.
One of our patients was really "down in the dumps" so my co-worker told him to get his pecker up.
We looked at her like she was crazy....so she explained it meant to cheer up.
Occasionally my mom would tell us to lay the table and then, after dinner, she would tell us to rid it up.
My husband still calls the refrigerator an ice box.


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Sorry. Double post.

This post was edited by carol_in_california on Sat, Nov 16, 13 at 0:58


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"My grandmother who said "I reckon" and "down yonder" grew up in southern Illinois--I always figured that is where she got those phrases."

Maybe it is where her parents were from, or her grandparents. I find that it takes a couple of generations to get it out of your system.


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"My grandparents never used those phrases and they were born and bred in Mt. Sterling (a farrr more hick area about 40 miles away)."

Uh-oh. Some of my people come from Mt. Sterling, too. Grandma was born in Cooperstown, Brown County.

______________-

"My grandmother who said "I reckon" and "down yonder" grew up in southern Illinois--I always figured that is where she got those phrases.
Kate"

Quincy's not really "southern Illinois"; it's the "belly button". Frank, I have all kinds of cousins in Quincy; we call the way they talk a "Quincy accent." Do you say "soda" or "pop?"


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When I moved to Kentucky I heard people say "I put something up." I thought "up where?" They meant that they put something "away."

I find it curious that people like to "sleep in." As opposed to what, sleeping out? I call it sleeping late.

Which I have not done since having children.


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RE: Regional Language

Soda. Everyone says "soda" here.

This is my edit. I have heard soda called 4 things in my life. Soda (my area). Soda pop (I do not remember where). Pop (I think Chicago). And coke (Virginia).

This post was edited by frank_il on Fri, Nov 15, 13 at 23:11


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RE: Regional Language

It's always been "pop" here.

Here is a link that might be useful: Soda vs. Pop map by US county


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RE: Regional Language

Duluth, that's a riot! Wonder who did that study.

Redsox, up here in the frozen tundra we love to sleep in when we can. The colder it gets, the harder it is to get out of bed. ;-)


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RE: Regional Language

To "put up" means to store. You put up tomatoes, you don't put them put them away. You can also put up money.

Once I and a friend went out to Kansas to cut wheat for a fellow that my friend knew. What a character, that guy - more parsimonious than any yankee and full of stories and crazy ideas. Anyway, once he gave us a lecture about how you "got to put money up", every year, after cutting wheat.


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RE: Regional Language

  • Posted by ohiomom 3rdrockfromthesun (My Page) on
    Sat, Nov 16, 13 at 7:54

I put up food for the winter and I occasionally "sleep in". We were taught to "put away money for a rainy day".


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RE: Regional Language

I never heard "sleep in" until I moved north. We would have called it 'oversleeping'.


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RE: Regional Language

duluth, my Duluth and TC friends say "ish" - that is definitely unique to Minnesota.


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RE: Regional Language

Moving from north to south seems to take the littlest time in changing accents... my daughter moved from northern Illinois to Tennessee, and in less than 6 months had adopted the local twang. We tease her about it in good fun, but it's surprising how fast that drawl forms.


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RE: Regional Language

A news article out this week about what accents people prefer and do not prefer:

Southern Accent Voted Most Attractive


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RE: Regional Language

Yes. I can remember "ish" from my earliest childhood. "Oh ish" for something/anything icky.


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RE: Regional Language

I really stumbled into one when I first made an Irish acquaintance and offered him a ride at the end of the evening. In his regionalism, I was just offering him a lift to his hotel. His double take, my lifted eyebrow and we did not have to move on to explaining that when the Irish and English say they will knock you up, they mean they will give you a call.


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RE: Regional Language

About those attractive regional accents (see link above), I thought the gender difference was interesting.

1st Southern --" 36.5% (45% male/28% female)
2nd New York --"16.5% (10% male/23% female)

While guys strongly preferred the Southern accent to the Northern accent, women had a weaker preference for the Southern accent and a preference nearly the same for a New York accent.

Not sure what to make of that, except that that study found little similarity between men's and women's accent preferences.

I wonder if the study took in to account whether the target groups were thinking of the regional speakers as male or female or both.

Kate


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RE: Regional Language

Yes, I ran into the "do you want me to knock you up?" the year I spent in Europe, getting up early to ski with some Brits.

In the South, after we return from the grocery store, we" put up" our purchases. We don't put them away. So there is a double meaning for "put up."

When I was growing up in GA we said "I'm aiming to fix dinner." When I moved to NW PA, I heard "Are you going to get dinner?"

Also, often, in the deep South, what we now call "lunch" was served in the early afternoon, then naptime. But we called it "dinner." Whatever meal was eaten in the evening was called "supper."

And, yes, a "coke" was any soft drink.


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RE: Regional Language

When I moved from central Florida to NC at 16, it was quite a shock. People kept asking me what part of the North I was from and usually assuming New York - it seemed to be the default northern city. When I said Fla. they would say "Oh, you're a Sand Yankee then".
If they asked "Do you want a dope?" they were asking if you wanted a soft drink. I guess that came from the days when cocaine was formulated into Coca-cola.
"I swanee" was usually spoken with fluttering hand movements by a motherly type as an expression of astonishment.
"Lets go to the house" was said instead of goodbye. Of course, if you had agreed, you would have been warmly accepted at their supper table no matter how little they had.


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RE: Regional Language

Recently I was reading a memoir written by a young woman in Massachusetts. She pointed out the fact that the Southern accent is very widespread and not connected to any particular demographic.

In most other regional areas, such as Mass or NY, a hard local accent is (not always, but very typically) associated with a lower level of education. Unless you happen to have the Kennedy accent, that is.

My Mother, who grew up in Boston without 2 cents in her pocket, says "To-mah-to"


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RE: Regional Language

Floridians may think that all Northerners are from NY, but in Texas, they assume all Northerners are from Boston--I don't know why, but I had to repeatedly explain that So. Dakota was also North, in fact, straight up north on the map, whereas Boston was not only much farther away (from both Texas and So. Dak.), but it was as much like a foreign land to a "northerners" from So. Dakotan as it was to "southerners" from Texas.

The Texans never had much to say after I gave them that information. They would just give me a puzzled look.

So. Dakotans drink pop, by the way.

Kate


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RE: Regional Language

Posted by dublinbay z6 KS (My Page) on
Sat, Nov 16, 13 at 14:47

Floridians may think that all Northerners are from NY, but in Texas, they assume all Northerners are from Boston--I don't know why, but I had to repeatedly explain that So. Dakota was also North, in fact, straight up north on the map, whereas Boston was not only much farther away (from both Texas and So. Dak.), but it was as much like a foreign land to a "northerners" from So. Dakotan as it was to "southerners" from Texas.

The Texans never had much to say after I gave them that information. They would just give me a puzzled look.

So. Dakotans drink pop, by the way.

Kate

*

With what kind of Texans did you associate?

I lived in Texas for over twenty years and everyone I knew most certainly considered North Dakota the north.

And guess what--they could identify the state, as well as New York and Massachusetts and knew they were located in the Northeast part of our country.

I don't know where you people meet the people you say you do in the South. Obviously it is not in educated circles.


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RE: Regional Language

Pn said.... "To "put up" means to store. You put up tomatoes, '

I am an avid canner and I put tomatoes etc "down" not up.......put up is what I do with mys sisters husband.

Here any soft drink is called pop not soda......unless of course one is making a spritzer....then it's soda. Actually , now that I think of it tonic is never called pop either.

"bugger off" is an expression we use that has no swearing connotation at all but it seems to be offensive in the States not sure why but I know it raises eyebrows .

The one I love the best is an expression used in Newfoundland

"Stay where you are 'till I get where you're at"


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RE: Regional Language

I don't know where you people meet the people you say you do in the South. Obviously it is not in educated circles.

Wow, simply state the truth about what happened, and demi goes into insult mode--feeling insulted and therefore speaking in insulting ways to others!

Ok, demi--hang on. Most of the people I associated with most of the time in Texas were on the campus of Texas Tech University. Are you sure you seriously want to call them uneducated?

You may hate what I say, demi, but I DO NOT LIE and I resent your implication that I am just making up stories in order to put down the South. And yes, during the oil embargoes some years ago, I really did hear more than one Texan belligerently mutter "Let the Yankees freeze" and declare his support for secession from the Union. That might partially explain why I'm not overly partial to Texans.

Southerners (like every other group in the world) are not perfect, you know.

Kate

P. S. Demi, South Dakota is NOT North Dakota, and North Dakota is NOT South Dakota, in case you didn't know. For some reason you changed my S.Dak. reference to N.Dak. Just wanted to make sure you weren't confused about your geography.

This post was edited by dublinbay on Sat, Nov 16, 13 at 15:35


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RE: Regional Language

About 3 months ago, a college educated, professionally employed man who lives just outside of Dallas asked me if I had heard that there had been a pretty bad tornado earlier this year in Moore, OK.

I replied that yes, I had heard that because we do get national news in the Midwest.

The rest of the group I was in had a good chuckle at this guy's expense. Born and raised Texan.


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RE: Regional Language

DB--sorry, I didn't go back and read, I thought you typed North Dakota, not South Dakota.

Of course I am not confused about my geography, I just didn't go back and reread your post. But thanks for trying to imply this southerner doesn't know geography, just like you did in your original post.

Makes no difference to my point.

I did not imply you are making it up.

I honestly want to know what kind of uneducated people you were suggesting you came into contact with since you were incredulous at how little they knew.

You're the one that spent time with these people and mocked them, not me.

And yes, I am quite familiar with Texas Tech, Lubbock, and West Texas.

All the people I knew and still know from the area know their country's geography.

So why do you think the students, teachers (?) at Texas Tech are less educated than the people I knew and worked with from that region?

This post was edited by demifloyd on Sat, Nov 16, 13 at 15:44


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RE: Regional Language

  • Posted by ohiomom 3rdrockfromthesun (My Page) on
    Sat, Nov 16, 13 at 15:55

.....and another thread that had actually been fun (for a change) swirls around the bowl.


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RE: Regional Language

So why do you think the students, teachers (?) at Texas Tech are less educated than the people I knew and worked with from that region?

Wow, you are just trying to pick a fight! What makes me think that people said those things to me? Because I heard them say those things!

What a dumb question--what makes me think the TTU folks I knew were less educated than the TTU folks you knew? Huh? The comparison you are asking for makes no sense at all.

And what's more, you are totally mis-interpreting my original post on this--because you are a literalist, which causes you serious problems when people are speaking figuratively. The point of my comments was about ATTITUDES, not geography--about VALUES. For instance, I was telling them that rather than viewing me as the northern enemy (from Boston), they should realize that Boston attitudes are as foreign to someone from South Dakota as they are to someone from Texas--that therefore rather than collapsing S.Dak. into Boston (in terms of attitudes and values, remember) and opposing both of them to Texas, they should rather consider the fact that S.Dak. fits better (in terms of attitudes and values, remember) paired together with Texas and the S.Dak-Texas combination opposed to Boston (in terms of attitudes and values, remember).

Whew---you really wanted me to go into all that just to briefly note a Texas vs a Florida regional expression?

There--you got all riled up over nothing. Now carry on some more--I'm leaving this dumb conversation.

Kate


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RE: Regional Language

My grandmother put up tomatoes & vegetables, meaning that she canned them.


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RE: Regional Language

I think the phrase "put down" when referring to canning originated because the jars were all stored "down" stairs in the root cellar.

After all the canning was finished it was put down for storage.


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RE: Regional Language

And what's more, you are totally mis-interpreting my original post on this--because you are a literalist, which causes you serious problems when people are speaking figuratively. The point of my comments was about ATTITUDES, not geography--about VALUES. For instance, I was telling them that rather than viewing me as the northern enemy (from Boston), they should realize that Boston attitudes are as foreign to someone from South Dakota as they are to someone from Texas--that therefore rather than collapsing S.Dak. into Boston (in terms of attitudes and values, remember) and opposing both of them to Texas, they should rather consider the fact that S.Dak. fits better (in terms of attitudes and values, remember) paired together with Texas and the S.Dak-Texas combination opposed to Boston (in terms of attitudes and values, remember).

Whew--you really wanted me to go into all that just to briefly note a Texas vs a Florida regional expression?

*

No, I didn't want you to to a lot of trouble, but I'm glad you did.

I understand your comments better.

Thanks.


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RE: Regional Language

Thank you, demi, for that last post. That was truly a courteous response.

You're welcome.

Kate


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RE: Regional Language

We call it soda, and we put up tomatoes. (I actually don't but..) We also call them hoagies, not subs. I'm not crazy about deep southern accents. It was one reason I didn't jump on the Edwards bandwagon , and I used to cringe at Carter. I like New England accent the best ,and I see that mid Atlantic has the worst dislikes. I have a hard time picking out regional accents except New York , New England ,and the deep south. Why do we in PA and Delaware sound any different than someone in Ohio or Maryland?

In PA, the west says youins and in the east ,youse guys. Here in the middle, I never hear either.

But according to grandson, I put a R in wash.


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RE: Regional Language

Albion's Seed gives a thorough explanation of the roots and development of the American - and to a lesser extent the Canadian - dialects.


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RE: Regional Language

Posted by dublinbay z6 KS (My Page) on
Sat, Nov 16, 13 at 18:24

Thank you, demi, for that last post. That was truly a courteous response.

You're welcome.

Kate

*

Thanks Kate.

I swear I do not have horns, it's just that I feel so beat up around here sometimes I do not always give everyone the benefit of the doubt like I did in the beginning.

I should have you.
Thanks for the post. ')


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RE: Regional Language

While this may not be regional please somebody tell me,

is it stark raving mad or star craving mad. I have seen both and it does leave me a bit confused.

As far as accents mentioned above, north or south has nothing on a good British accent. One of my previous employers, one of the tech support guys, could have listened to that man read from the dictionary for hours.


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RE: Regional Language

I have only heard it as "stark" raving mad. Not sure what stark means in that context--maybe completely out in the open, totally exposed, not covered up.

Kate


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RE: Regional Language

"Stark raving mad"

I think it means "plain crazy". As kate implied "stark", meaning "out in the open", or "plain to see." "Raving" as in the ravings of a lunatic.


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RE: Regional Language

I like 'barking mad'. It really brings up an image, doesn't it?


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RE: Regional Language

I knew of a woman in this town who sat on the curb in front of a local watering hole and barked and howled at the moon when she was tanked. She wasn't angry mad; she was loca mad. That's the image you conjured for me, brown ;-)


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RE: Regional Language

Rumors from a nearby town say that there was an animal-rescue type woman who went bonkers. Supposedly a nearby homeowner discovered here in his chicken-coop going after his chickens and she was yipping and barking like a fox. Probably an exaggerated story, but an entertaining one.

A client later bought her property and so I was the one who cleaned up and renovated the barn where she kept the animals in cages. The animal obsession seems to plague women more than men. Why is that?


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RE: Regional Language

So why on the coke/pop/soda link, is St. Louis and surrounding areas so heavily steeped in a manner similar to the northeast? HM!


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RE: Regional Language

"The animal obsession seems to plague women more than men. Why is that?"

The urge to nurture?


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