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Propagation methods for Hoyas

Posted by alavoneluvhoya none (My Page) on
Thu, May 31, 12 at 13:34

I have been using the stem method on all of my hoyas. I would like some insight on air layering method and how effective is it for hoyas? It is very odd for me to have a bad spell with the stem method but would like to try other methods of propagation. Any ideas or past success would be appreciated my many in this forum!


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RE: Propagation methods for Hoyas

I have tried to use this method before and it did not work well for me. I found that it was hard to keep the rooting material moist enough for the required length of time even though it was enclosed in plastic. I had used sphagnum moss and secured it along a bare vine with plastic wrap. If you were to simply bury part of a growth into a fresh pot of mix of a new 4" pot and then wait for roots to form you would get a quick response from the plant. Even weighing down a vine with a flat rock on top of a pot filled with potting mix would work well.

Check out the Apodagis site and look at the bottom of the page for the PDF files that contain the back issues of STEMMA Magazine. One of the early issues was on propagation of Hoyas. For anyone new to Hoyas or just new to STEMMA the magazine back issues are a must read.

Mike

Here is a link that might be useful: Apodagis Hoyas


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RE: Propagation methods for Hoyas

Interesting notes, Mike. I know Sue or maybe someone else discussed at some length, their experiences with rooting Hoyas this way (can't find the thread now, of course), and I recall them saying they misted the moss regularly, so perhaps an end was left open to allow this.

I was thinking I would like to try this at least once myself, and I have to say I am not encouraged by your 'meh' results. You're probably right and bringing the node in contact with the preferred medium is simply stronger and more logical. Probably would be with the same with many of the plants that are currently cultivated through air layering if only they were able to bring the rooting point down to the ground, like we are.


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RE: Propagation methods for Hoyas

keeping the material moist is my problem with air layering.Also I am not sure if it is beneficial to break or damage the stem to promote new growth I have tried leaving it alone as well and see no difference in my result.


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RE: Propagation methods for Hoyas

With Hoyas you don't have to scratch away the surface of the vine or make cuts etc. Hoyas naturally produce roots from along their stems as long as long as there is moisture or high enough humidity to suatain the root growth.

Mike


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RE: Propagation methods for Hoyas

so say hypothetically that you have a hoya that has dry aerial roots that look probably dead... if you were to try air layering or even chopping it off the plant below those aerial roots should they come to life or at least new ones grow out and become main roots?


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RE: Propagation methods for Hoyas

You dont even need there to have already been roots there. Most Hoyas will root anywhere along their growts although some seem to prefer to root from leaf nodes, or at least root more heavily form the leaf nodes.

Mike


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RE: Propagation methods for Hoyas

Hi I am totally new to Hoyas. My sister died 2 weeks ago and had many many hoyas. I have brought several home with me that are already potted but some that are just leaves with a stem or just leaves that have either roots or some sort of node coming out of them. I want to know what to do with them. I will post pictures if I can figure out how. Thanks for your help. Holly


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RE: Propagation methods for Hoyas

Holly,

I'm so sorry to hear about the loss of your sister. Your post is just heartbreaking and I really hope we can help you. I remember having a conversation with my sister once telling her I wanted everyone in my family to take one Hoya if I died. She looked terrified as she explained how stressed she would be that she would kill it. I don't know how serious I was when the words came out of my mouth, but I knew after that, that I'd never want any of them to feel what she described. I hope you aren't putting that kind of pressure on yourself. We've actually had discussions here about what we would want to happen to our plants if we died, but I never thought we'd hear it from your perspective. It makes me really sad. T_T

To answer your question:

I'm not sure I fully understand what you have on your hands. It sounds like you have some rooted plants and also some cuttings that your sister hadn't gotten around to rooting yet? Or that you took from her mother plants?

It is less clear what you mean by a leaf with some roots or a node coming out of it. If you mean a rooted kerrii leaf (heart shaped) then it probably won't produce more growth, although it will survive for a long time like that. If there is a node, no matter how small the cutting is, it will eventually put out a new vine. You just have to give it enough time.

All you need to do to root a cutting is to put it in soil with one of the nodes touching or under the soil. If it's possible to expose multiple nodes, either by lying the vine horizontally across the surface (looped around the pot rim, for example), or by submerging several, then that gives the vine more places to root from.

The soil Hoyas like is an airy fast draining mix. An exampe of such a mix is potting soil, perlite, and some bark or orchid mix, in a 1:1:1 blend.

Hoyas come from very different climates and can have different needs. But most of them like to dry out between waterings, so be careful not to overwater. Learn the difference between the weight of the pot when its light and ready for more water, versus still heavy. Or stick your finger in the first couple inches of soil and water when it feels completely dry.

Last, put the Hoyas somewhere they get a lot of light. Some Hoyas do well in northern windows, but most prefer south or east, if you can offer it.

Sorry if I haven't answered the questions you need answering, or have covered ground you don't need help on. It does seem like you've been doing some solid research already, to have found this thread. Good luck and hang in there.


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RE: Propagation methods for Hoyas

Here are the pictures, if you could help me plant and identify that would be great! Thank you. Holly


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RE: Propagation methods for Hoyas

Here are the pictures, if you could help me plant and identify that would be great! Thank you. Holly


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RE: Propagation methods for Hoyas

Here are the pictures, if you could help me plant and identify that would be great! Thank you. Holly


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RE: Propagation methods for Hoyas

Here are the pictures, if you could help me plant and identify that would be great! Thank you. Holly


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RE: Propagation methods for Hoyas

Here are the pictures, if you could help me plant and identify that would be great! Thank you. Holly


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RE: Propagation methods for Hoyas

Here are the pictures, if you could help me plant and identify that would be great! Thank you. Holly


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RE: Propagation methods for Hoyas

Here are the pictures, if you could help me plant and identify that would be great! Thank you. Holly


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RE: Propagation methods for Hoyas

Here are the pictures, if you could help me plant and identify that would be great! Thank you. Holly


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RE: Propagation methods for Hoyas

Here are the pictures, if you could help me plant and identify that would be great! Thank you. Holly


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RE: Propagation methods for Hoyas

more


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RE: Propagation methods for Hoyas

more


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RE: Propagation methods for Hoyas

I am not sure if this is a hoya at all


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RE: Propagation methods for Hoyas

1 DS-70
2 obscura?
3 kerrii
4 not a Hoya
5 variegated kerrii
6 not a Hoya (Cryptocereus)
7 ? maybe an archiboldiana? Too hard for me to tell.

Regarding the Hoyas

I would cut the DS-70 into 2-3 sections and then pot them up as described above, with multiple nodes touching the soil. I'd definitely loop at least one of them around the edge of the pot, since DS-70 has nice pliant vines and this is easy to do.

The obscura? I would probably do as 2 starts. You could do it as one, too, but if you do two then you have a backup if something goes wrong. I would probably just stick the bottom of each section into the soil, so that the bottom-most node is dug into the soil but the leaf/leaves coming out of it can remain mostly above ground.

The kerriis look fine at the size that they are. Just stick the bottom nodes into the soil. The solo leaf in picture 3 you might as well toss, as it is very unlikely to turn into a full plant. But you can stick it in the soil next to one of the other starts if you want and it will root and stay alive for a long time.

The Cryptocereus is easy to root. Just stick the end in soil appropriate for a cactus, which is what it is. It's almost impossible to kill, so no worries.

Number 7, just stick into the soil so the bottom node is submerged and the second node is touching the soil.

Since it's fall, you might want to give them some extra humidity and even put them on a heat mat if you have one. You can put them in an aquarium, or clear tupperware container, or a large freezer bag with air blown into it. Keep them in bright indirect light while they are rooting. It's especially important not to expose baggie'd plants to direct sunlight because they'll cook in the bag.


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RE: Propagation methods for Hoyas

And finally my sister. I wanted you all to see a small part of her collection. She worked for Pleasant View Gardens (a proven winners greenhouse) and had a lovely garden as well.


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RE: Propagation methods for Hoyas

Thank you so much for all your help! I will do as you say and keep you posted as to my success! (I am hopeful).


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RE: Propagation methods for Hoyas

Hi Holly,

Welcome to the Hoya Forum, so very sorry for your loss. That's a lovely picture of your sister. Judging from the look of these plants, I think she'd be pleased you've rallied some Hoya troops to help you. It's interesting to meet her through her taste in plants, mighty nice taste too in my opinion.

I think most of the IDs given above are right. I think the 4th plant, w/ blooms (non-Hoya) is an Echeveria (family of Crassulacae, that of Jade).

The very last plant is some kind of Rhipsalis (jungle cactus, epiphytic), likes bright, dappled, indirect light, frequent, thorough watering.

Pls. TELL US what the tag says in that pot of the variegated (green & white, some round) leaves, that's hanging suspended in that bracket. I'd love to know what that is to get some, is that a variegated H. Obovata? Looks like the leaves are fat & fleshy, very handsome plant. (It's the pic immediately above the one w/ the potted Rosemary.)

Pls. do touch base w/ us from time to time & let us know how you & the plants are doing. Wishing you (& them) the best.

(PG) Karen


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RE: Propagation methods for Hoyas

Welcome Holly XO! I look at number four and it looks to be a kalanchoe. Also known as air plants. The ones I have root from little plantlets on the leaf edges and root on top of semi moist soil, as it is a succulent. Perhaps lightly bury it sideways as suggested also. All of the plants look healthy as your sister was very gifted and looks like she carried a lot of grace to her life. ~ Mary


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RE: Propagation methods for Hoyas

Welcome Holly XO! I look at number four and it looks to be a kalanchoe. Also known as air plants. The ones I have root from little plantlets on the leaf edges and root on top of semi moist soil, as it is a succulent. Perhaps lightly bury it sideways as suggested also. All of the plants look healthy as your sister was very gifted and looks like she carried a lot of grace to her life. ~ Mary


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Hello all, First I want to thank g ghost for your kind words and quick reply. I am not worrying about the plants too much :) or at least not putting the pressure your sister seemed to feel. Lynne wouldn't have wanted that. I will just do my best with all of your help!

Hi Karen the pot that you questioned is from Kartuz Greenhouses and the tag says H obscuro x locunosa I hope i am reading the tag correctly. I went to the website and couldn't find the plant. I found it at http://www.epiphytica.com/ but it doesn't look the same??

Lynne loved all plants, she had ripsalis, begonias, hoya, euphorbia, and some really cool black gold philodendron and other philodendron as well. These were only some of the house plants she had. Logees was one of her favorite stores.

Thank you Karen for your advice about the Kalanchoe She liked them as well!!! I just went to the store to buy pots to plant all of these beauties. Wish me luck or pray for me!


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RE: Propagation methods for Hoyas

Hi Holly,

I'm sorry you've lost your sister. That has to be so hard. But it's so great that you've got some of her precious plants. I lost a friend from our local cactus club a few years ago and I have some of her plants and some of her hand-made pots (she was quite talented with pottery) and even now (a few years later), I think of her every time I water or groom one of her plants, or look over a plant in one of her pots. And I feel she's watching over her little plants and approves of my care...

The forth photo is (I'm pretty sure) Kalanchoe fedschenchoi (the variegated form). A gorgeous plant when grown well. It needs LOTS of light, full sun if possible. You don't say where you are, but if you're where it has to be grown inside in the winter, try to keep it in a south window, then put it outside in summer, moving it into full sun over a few weeks (so it doesn't sunburn). Oh, and when you put it in soil to root it, I'd remove the flower spike. Flowers take a lot of energy that it will need to root.

#6 is Selenicereus anthonyanus, an epiphytic plant. It roots easily. Let it dry out between waterings in winter, but water quite a bit in summer. It's wild grower, but you can cut it back as much as you want to force it into being more compact.

#12 is probably Rhipsalis elliptica. It's also an epiphytic cactus so treat it the same way as Selencereus. (I see it's budding up.) And if you want a fuller plant, I would cut it at some of those joints and plant more of the individual segments. If you do that, though, set the newly cut ones aside for a day or two before planting (to let the cut end callous over...)

Hope you have great success with your sis's plants.

Denise in Omaha


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