Return to the Hoya Forum | Post a Follow-Up

 o
Great Performing Hoyas

Posted by peanut01 7VA (My Page) on
Tue, Jul 26, 11 at 19:50

I just wanted to share pictures of some vigorous growing Hoyas. I got both these early spring as starter plants. I cannot wait to see them bloom.

Obscura
Photobucket

Merrillii
Photobucket

Together in habitat lol
Photobucket

Carnosa totem - loves to bloom when climbing up the rear trellis
Photobucket

Chlorantha received in trade last fall
Photobucket

Erthyostemma received in trade last fall
Photobucket

Daysantha received in trade early spring
Photobucket

Thanks for looking. Does everyone else find these hoyas to be vigorous growers?

-David


Follow-Up Postings:

 o
RE: Great Performing Hoyas

Your plants are beautiful! I have the merrillii and the carnosa, and I find that the carnosa grows in leaps and bounds- it's almost like you could watch it go! The merrillii is a cutting I've rooted, and it's just starting to take off. It's been a bit slow to get acclimated(user error, I'm sure lol), but I'm pretty sure that once it takes off, it will grow very well too. I'd like to mention my diversifolia- I REALLY love this one- it has grown 3-4 inches in the past two days. Seriously. My DH swears that it's going to reach out and grab someone one day! lol


 o
RE: Great Performing Hoyas

Very Nice Healthy looking plants!


 o
RE: Great Performing Hoyas

All your plants look great.I just got Daysantha and I hope it grows as nice as yours.Its a bit yellow right now.

Cindy


 o
RE: Great Performing Hoyas

Beautiful hoyas!

I'm going to ask a stupid question. I'm guessing you live in Virginia? In the winter, I'm guessing you bring your hoyas indoors (I'm just a 'lil naiive Californian who has never lived anywhere else.. lol). What part of the house do you put them during the winter months?

What is your secret for making them so healthy? What kind of food (if any) do you feed them?

TammyPie


 o
RE: Great Performing Hoyas

Those are some nice and healthy looking Hoyas. Your Hoya obscura looks big enough to bloom this summer. I think I am the only person who ever had a rough start with this Hoya but mine is finally blooming not that I have had it for about four years. LOL
Your merrillii looks awesome, love those shiny leaves.

Do you know what the big green leaved Begonia is?

Mike


 o
RE: Great Performing Hoyas

I see cardinal climber leaf shadows! I love that plant. Believe it or not, I grew and bloomed them in a plastic cup in my dorm window. I thought that was kind of funny.

Your hoyas all look so happy and healthy and non bug eaten... do you have a trick to keeping them away? My backyard is infested with grasshoppers. They decimated my dahlia and even ate a hole through my opuntia. I'm glad I never managed to put any hoyas back there. Especially since the mosquitoes are out in full force despite the neighbor finally emptying out their stagnant pool full of almost two year old water. I guess you can stand outside for five minutes now instead of fifteen seconds, so there IS an improvement!

One of these days I'll get obscura. You're convincing me to get merrillii also, because that one is absolutely gorgeous. What is that giant leaf next to erythrostemma?


 o
RE: Great Performing Hoyas

Oooooh, like the begonia too. Does it have a name? Lovely plants and photos!


 o
RE: Great Performing Hoyas

K&C - I do not have Diversifolia but I hear it is a fast grower. I should try to get one though, I love the variable leaves.

TPie - I try to leave my hoyas out as long into the fall as possible. I usually will leave some of the cool/cold growers out until the night time temps drop down to about 45. The warm grower I will pull inside when night time temps get down to 60. I grow them all by windows inside the house. The ones that are more tolerant to drying out get to live upstairs in the winter in south facing windows. The others that I need to monitor a little closer live in my sunroom nook area with windows on three sides of them. I have 2 plant stands/racks that I have put together to display my plants on inside. The newest stand that I made is a bleacher style stand that is 3 rows high and 8 feet long. I will be posting a picture of it when I finish it. I am trying to decide what color stain to use :) It has to look good outside and look good inside too. I don't have a "secret" to keeping them so healthy. I do not feed them very often, but when I pot them up or repot I do dose the soil with mycorrhizal fungi. I have went through a small bottle of Superthrive in 3 years, and have used a minimal amount of bloom booster. I am on the look out for the Dyna Gro fertilizer that some others use on their hoyas.

Cindy - My only observation I have made so far about Daysantha is that it prefers to grow in lower light conditions. If prefers is not accurate then I will say it looks better grown in low light. I put that pot in a little brighter light for about 3 days then the leave turned dull in comparison to how it looked.

Mike - Before I started growing hoyas, obscura was the first one that I read about. I stumbled upon a thread where someone described the scent as Fruit Loops(I think Dmichael). At that time I was on a mission to find it. I hope for blooms on this one. Looking at obscura from the underside I notice branching at almost every node. If this one makes it through the winter well enough I suspect I will have a monster on my hands by the end of next summer. I have already taken a few cuttings to bulk up that pot. Fresh cuttings are so much easier than cuttings that are ordered through the mail, I can just cut off the vine and poke it down in the soil and it roots with no issue. I previously had problems rooting obscura but not this time. This obscura is the IML 1003. I also just received IML 0234 and look forward to growing that obscura as well. Merrillii has been growing in low light for most this summer in the shade of a tree. I think I will let her finish the rest of the summer growing in part shade, but I will make a cutting or two to bulk up that pot as well.

Quinn - I love the Cardinal Climber or Cypress Vine which we call them. The leaves remind me of some sort of midevil shield or crest. I have been expanding my vine repertoire every year but have been growing this variety as an annual for the past four years. I added Confederate Jasmine and Moonflower to my trellis this year. I am not a fan of the moonflower though :( No fragrance to speak of, the blooms open in the morning rather than night(which leads me to believe that I have some sort of Ipomea other than Moonflower), and the blooms are so high up that I can only see them from my 3rd story window at this time. Next year I will try growing Corkscrew vine and a White Cypress vine on my trellis. If you want to trade send me an email, I am sure I can find a little Merrillii and Obscura to cut for you :) No trick on the bugs. I think I have success due to the fact that I have a big variety of plants for them to choose from. The bugs typically bother my garden plants such as my Morning Glories, Datura, Brugmansia, some Glads, and Hostas, but not much more. My plants that have it worse are my azaleas which are currently infested with some sort of fly(I foget what type ATM). Also I have a big strip of Butterfly bushes on the side of my home which attracts every sort of flying insect known to man, so maybe they all get hung up there and don't quite make it to my houseplants. idk :)

Thanks for looking everyone. I am not sure what the name is of that begonia. I received it as a leave cutting from my sister early spring along with another begonia. After receiving it I was prompted to search online for other begonias and I almost got hooked. I will try to get an id on it and would be willing to share some with anyone in the States(sorry).

Also, can anyone describe Merrillii's fragrance? Also I would love to share pics of some of my other plants but feel restricted since this is a Hoya forum :(

-David


 o
RE: Great Performing Hoyas

David,

Beautiful hoyas, well grown!

Have you ever visited Merrifield Gardens (3 locations, Manassas, on 29 between Centreville and Fairfax, and Merrifield on 29? I believe you may be able to find Dyna-Grow there. At least I have seen it there before. If you haven't been there, you are in for a real treat. My favorite of all their locations is the one between Centreville and Fairfax on 29. It is a rarer plant greenhouse.

Susan


 o
RE: Great Performing Hoyas

Susan - Thanks for the info regarding Merrifield and Dyna-Grow. Maybe I can get up there this weekend, I think this weekend is free for me :) I have only been to one of the locations once and that was probably like 16 years ago before I started growing anything. I understand that I should bring lots of $$$ when going there for I will not be able to go home empty handed.

-David


 o
RE: Great Performing Hoyas

David, your plants are georgeous. Do you spray them with something to make them so shiny? Most of mine look rather dull. Mine are outside under patio roof, getting some early morning sun.


 o
RE: Great Performing Hoyas

David I post photos of my other plants form time to time as well and I really don't think anyone minds. I would just add them to this thread.

Mike


 o
RE: Great Performing Hoyas

Oh, David! They look brilliant! They definitely have a good thing going with you. I can't believe how big your merrillii has gotten! It's positively resplendant. I <3 this one! ^_^

I definitely think your erythrostemma is growing faster than mine. It's all that great outdoor light it's getting. I'm totally jealous in a good way.

The leaves on your dasyantha look really different from mine. It must be the different growing conditions. Mine are darker, which is to be expected, but also a lot smaller and more succulent. My villosa recently threw a leaf that looked like this, which is a bit weird, all broad and slightly convex.

I do find my varieties of obscura to be pretty vigorous, as well as merrilli and chlorantha. My dasyantha grows pretty slowly, but it used to grow faster, so I think I just need to bite the bullet and supplement the lighting in that area. Probably before winter hits >_> Erythrostemma seems to grow in fits for me. I'll think it's not growing and then forget about it and the next time it draws my attention it's done something surprising. If you like this one, you might want to consider IML 1188. This is the other one I have and it has larger showier leaves - very pretty. I like the cuter compact leaves on yours too.

I think the freshness of the cuttings makes a difference and also the fact that the plant is already accustomed to your conditions. They've gotten to know you and your ways and that makes all the difference to them, apparently.

/Mike

You're not the only one who has had trouble with obscura. I find both of my varieties very fussy. They both spot their leaves when they are displeased with the watering schedule and drop young leaves pretty regularly with their own private logic. And yet they persevere.... Now that one has gotten to a mature age, it is starting to be slightly less fussy, so I hope they're like cats and get more mellow and inclined to sit on your lap with age.


 o
RE: Great Performing Hoyas

David..maybe call b4 going and ask if they have the Dyna-Grow.. I don't want you to get there and them not have it, but I know I saw it there a few years back (was there about 2 months ago but didn't check out the plant food because I'm really happy with the Miracle Grow now). If they don't have it, I know they'll order for you. One of the workers told me one time that they would order plants for customers. Yes take your plastic or $$$$. The last time I went, I didn't see too many hoyas but some of the other plant families will take your breath away. I would suggest going to the one on 29 between Centreville and Fairfax but if you have time, take in all 3. LOL!!
Susan


 o
RE: Great Performing Hoyas

Here are some updates on these plants and some others. I just got a new camera and wanted to try it out.

Merrillii got some sun!!!
Photobucket

Peduncle!!!
Photobucket

Full Length
Photobucket

Erythrostemma
Photobucket

Bday surprise hoya
Photobucket

Debris catch
Photobucket

New growth :)
Photobucket

Unknown hoya
Photobucket

Linearis after cut
Photobucket

A monster in the making
Photobucket

Bloom
Photobucket

Full length
Photobucket

Kirabella and me w/ DS-70
Photobucket

Thanks for looking.
-David


 o
RE: Great Performing Hoyas

Great pictures David! Great Camera too..The hoyas are all looking SO healthy and pretty! Congrats! You're definitely taking care of them properly and it shows!

Your little girl is just beautiful!! What a cutie! Thanks for the update.

Nancy


 o
RE: Great Performing Hoyas

Wow I really like your Merrillii!! Very pretty! And your little one is pretty darn beautiful too! :0)
Thanks for the photos!


 o
RE: Great Performing Hoyas

Thanks for sharing your photos.Your hoyas look very well cared for.Your little one is also very cute.

Cindy


 o
RE: Great Performing Hoyas

Nice pictures David. The best bloom is Kirabella. What a beautiful name for a beautiful little girl.
Your plants are growing by leaps and bounds. You must have the perfect spot for them.


 o
RE: Great Performing Hoyas

Oh,,, David... a feast for the eyes!... all so beautiful, esp your daughter!... I would like to say that I adore the Merrillii... will be planning that as my next purchase... I love those leaves!... and as for the begonia, it looks like an Angel Wing... as I had one for many many years that my dad had started for me... I no longer have him or the begonia... noticed someone I drive by on my way to work has one on her porch.. working on the courage to stop and ask for a cutting!... sentimental favorite... Thanks for sharing your great collection... so healthy and picturesqe!... Eileen


 o
RE: Great Performing Hoyas

David your Hoyas look fantastic and there is no doubt that they love where you have them outside. You Hoya linearis is gorgeous and lambii looks nicely settled in with that new leaf.
Your unknown Hoya reminds me of a plant I got under the name Hoya aff. pubifera, not sure of the ID but it has flowers much like Hoya kentiana. I guess we will have to wait and see.

It's nice to be able to put a face to your online presence.

Mike


 o
RE: Great Performing Hoyas

Is the "new growth" H. polystachia albomarginata?
The hoya debris catch (lambii) will grow best in low light and under the canopy of just dappled light from a heavy leafy tree above. Don't be too surprised if you find roots all entangled in this debris mess that it catches inside the funnel made by multiple leaf layers.
Grow erythrostemma dense like how you're growing obscura and ds-70. Plant multiple rooted cuttings into the same hanging basket and watch it perform better than most other species. This species likes competition. From other plats and itself.
If you can grow H. linearis this well, you should try your luck with H. fusca. I bet you'll make this grow like a weed as well! H. linearis is more difficult to grow than fusca (according to those who can grow both). Other related high elevation species that would grow well for you include H. engleriana, bella, lacunosa (& variegata-albomarginata, lanceolata, serpens, etc.

Try some variegated violet fertilizer on your obscura and watch it out-flower H. lacunosa!


 o
RE: Great Performing Hoyas

Nice looking plants, David!

On your Sept. post in the pic with the Merrillii and the passion vine, what is the plant in the lower left corner -- a Stapelia or Huernia perhaps?


 o
RE: Great Performing Hoyas

@ Paul - Huernia schneideriana - Thanks

@ RFG - The new growth is H. macrophylla 'Variegata'. Thanks for the sagely advise RFG. I know what you mean regarding erythrostemma liking competition... It was previously twining with the Cardinal Climber before I pulled it out to take a picture. I will have to bring my self around to cut this one but was waiting for my first blooms. H. fusca is a nice looking plant(thanks for the recommendation). Most of the others you listed I am currently growing.

@ Mike - The unknown hoya is a fast grower and heavy with aerial roots. I will have to wait to see when blooms come around. I would be happy to have H. aff. pubifera. I am not that great at smiling for pics and Kira didn't want to sit still for the pic, but the DS-70 couldn't be denied.

@ Eileen - Send me an email. Begonias can be propagated very easily from stem and leave cuttings.

Thanks to all for the great comments.

My wife and I read that Kira meant "Dark Haired" in Gaelic and Bella means "Beauty" in Italian. My wife is Italian and I am of Scottish descent. Wiki says Kira means "Dark" though, so she can be "Dark Beauty" as well. We call her Kirabella, Kira, Bella, KB, Little Bear, and Sweet Tart.

-David


 o
RE: Great Performing Hoyas

Another error, H. macrophylla has not been rediscovered. The albomarginated form is of polystachia NOT macrophylla. Macrophylla's closest kin is Diversifolia B, but flowers do not match. Macrophylla has attractive flowers not the drab pale white-flesh colored flowers of polystachia. You will also notice that with age the peducle will branch, hence "poly" in polystachia.

Chop up the erythrostemma and place it with many cuttings in a single pot, this will produce many umbels of flowers all the time. This species doesn't do well pampered. Give it neglect and it will do well.


 o
RE: Great Performing Hoyas

Hoya diversifolia B being the plant we often see named Hoya loyceandrewsiana and sometimes latifolia.
If anyone wants to see more of the mess that is Hoya macrophylla read Christine Burton's response. This is something I was not aware of but because there were two different species named Hoya macrophylla by two different people the first publication takes precedence and the second is in error.

It's interesting that so many Hoya species are confused and that more wide spread corrections have not been made. Is there really this little interest in taxonomy of Hoyas that there has not been a revision of the genus done? I tend to keep the names I acquire by plants under unless they are obviously wrong, otherwise I assume that they were properly identified for the most part.

Polystachya means many flower spikes although I have seen many sheaths of grain also used to explain the name. The orchid genus Polystachya is one that I am very fond of and they are known for having many branched flower spikes on mature plants. Fingers grossed that my Polystachya paniculata will flower for the first time this fall. The Internet Orchid Photo Encyclopedia mentions that the name Polystachya refers to the capability for this genus to rebloom off of old spikes.

Mike

Here is a link that might be useful: Hoya macrophylla


 o
RE: Great Performing Hoyas

Holy doodle, ya wanna come give me some lessons on how to grow hoyas? I thought I knew! I myself am partial to that wee Hoya 'Kirabella'. She's my favorite.

Obscura is an enigma. Grows like a son of a gun when you first buy her and then gets up to some highjinks for the next few years. Mine is dropping leaves and blooming. What's up with that?

Kelly in Victoria


 o
RE: Great Performing Hoyas

Reading all the long time controversies of the many hoya names over the years always makes my eyes cross, my head spin, my ears ring, and my face fall into the keyboard. LOL. If I stay with this hobby till I am a hundred..I will never get it straight! I have many tags with AKAs on them. Ha


 o
RE: Great Performing Hoyas

This is the problem when one individual just assigns names to plants, write a catalog or makes mention with pictures of what hoya species A and what hoya species B is and guess what? ALL COMPLETELY WRONG!!!!! Then compound time of hoya exchanges, new growers selling wrong named hoyas and you have a massed confusion.

Any way, nice (wrongly named) plants you got there!


 o Post a Follow-Up

Please Note: Only registered members are able to post messages to this forum.

    If you are a member, please log in.

    If you aren't yet a member, join now!


Return to the Hoya Forum

Information about Posting

  • You must be logged in to post a message. Once you are logged in, a posting window will appear at the bottom of the messages. If you are not a member, please register for an account.
  • Please review our Rules of Play before posting.
  • Posting is a two-step process. Once you have composed your message, you will be taken to the preview page. You will then have a chance to review your post, make changes and upload photos.
  • After posting your message, you may need to refresh the forum page in order to see it.
  • Before posting copyrighted material, please read about Copyright and Fair Use.
  • We have a strict no-advertising policy!
  • If you would like to practice posting or uploading photos, please visit our Test forum.
  • If you need assistance, please Contact Us and we will be happy to help.


Learn more about in-text links on this page here