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Inheritance of Juvenile Period in Cherry Hybrids

Posted by keking z6 KY (My Page) on
Thu, Jan 13, 11 at 17:00

I found this item and thought it might be of some interest to experimenters. It is particularly useful to know that the length of the juvenile period (time from germination to first flowers) tends to follow the seed parent in crosses between the two sections.
Karl

ISHS Acta Horticulturae 56: Symposium on Juvenility in Woody Perennials
ON THE INHERITANCE OF THE LENGTH OF THE JUVENILE PERIOD IN INTERSPECIFIC PRUNUS HYBRIDS
Author: H. Schmidt
Abstract:
A total of 3 200 interspecific hybrids within and between the 2 cherry sections Eucerasus (E) and Pseudocerasus (P) were screened for their length of juvenile period.
The E x E hybrids were the latest to flower, with P. avium and P. cerasus inheriting a longer juvenile period than P. fruticosa and P. canescens.

The P x P hybrids start to flower one year from seed with a JP50 of 1.55 years for the group. The shortest juvenile period is inherited by P. incisa 31, P. nipponica 17, and P. concinna, the longest by P. x hillieri. The E x P and P x E hybrids show a strong maternal inheritance of the length of the juvenile period. Whereas the course of flowering in the P x E group is nearly identical with the P x P hybrids, the E x P hybrids show a slight acceleration of flowering compared with the E x E group.

Adverse growing conditions in 1969 did not prevent P x P hybrids from flowering after 1 year, but prolonged the juvenile period in the E x E and E x P groups.

Schmidt, H. 1976. ON THE INHERITANCE OF THE LENGTH OF THE JUVENILE PERIOD IN INTERSPECIFIC PRUNUS HYBRIDS. Acta Hort. (ISHS) 56:229-234
http://www.actahort.org/books/56/56_26.htm


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Inheritance of Juvenile Period in Cherry Hybrids

Thanks Keking - That's interesting.


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RE: Inheritance of Juvenile Period in Cherry Hybrids

I have tried to find more information on differences in the length of juvenile period (the time from germination to first flower) in reciprocal crosses, but haven't come up with much.

In crosses among the watermelon (Citrullus edulis), fodder melon (C. colocynthoides), and Colocynth (C. colocynthis), the juvenile period is "intermediate" between the parents, but much closer to the seed parent.

In peas, as well, earliness tends to favor the seed parent.

In other cases, the seed parent seems to predominate in regards to hardiness (roses, apples). In other words, it is desirable (if possible) to use the hardier type as seed parent.

There are other reported differences in reciprocal crosses, which I've linked below.

Karl

Here is a link that might be useful: Differences in Reciprocal Crosses


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