Return to the Japanese Gardens Forum | Post a Follow-Up

 o
Big Trees in Japan --- Cool Website

Posted by Lee_ME z5 (My Page) on
Fri, Oct 7, 05 at 12:02

For anyone who loves big and/or old trees, here is a fabulous website you can navigate without necessarily needing to read Japanese.

Here's the site for a sample entry:

http://www.kyoboku.com/47/kagawa/en.html

The sample is the biggest pine tree in Japan, known as "Entsuji no matsu." It's a Japanese Black Pine, reputed to be 650 years old. It's located on the island of Shikoku in Kagawa Prefecture at a Buddhist temple called Entsuji. The trunk is 7 meters in circumference and the tree is 10 meters tall.

To browse through huge trees at other locations in Japan, go to:

http://www.kyoboku.com/47/

...you'll see a map of the prefectures of Japan. Click on any prefecture and you'll get an enlarged map of that prefecture with dots of various colors representing big trees of various types (for example, the pink dot is for cherry trees). Click on a dot to get photos and descriptions of individual trees.

We're planning our next trip to Japan next fall and my husband is an arborist and big fan of big trees, so we were happy to find this site to help us include some fabulous big trees in our itinerary!

Lee

Here is a link that might be useful: Entsuji no Matsu


Follow-Up Postings:

 o
RE: Big Trees in Japan --- Cool Website

Lee : )

Thanku!! Thanku !! So awesome. Truly

I could not resist clicking on your thread before I headed off for bed .
The Trees wow. thanx : )


 o
RE: Big Trees in Japan --- Cool Website

Many trees are venerated in Japan. If you go to Hiroshima, you will find a number of trees wearing placques that signify that they are survivors of the atomic blast.


 o
RE: Big Trees in Japan --- Cool Website

Cool! :) -- great site, Lee. There's someting truly inspirational about viewing these ancient survivors.. your fall trip is making me envious..

I'll have to content myself with one of Thomas Packenham's books instead :)

Jack


 o
RE: Big Trees in Japan --- Cool Website

Hi Jack ---

Yes, the Packenham books are fabulous, aren't they?

We're really excited about this next trip. I'm sending one of my employees to the Kyoto University of Art and Design intensive seminar on JG (which I attended a few years ago), and I just have to tag along myself! Before long we had also made plans to include my husband (the big tree fan), a close friend & her daughter. Still have to figure out how to pay for three trips --- but these things have a way of working themselves out.

We're thinking of making a home base in Okayama and doing day trips out from there for about a week of the trip. Does anyone have suggestions of interesting gardens or other cultural activities within striking distance (e.g., w/in two hours' train ride one way from Okayama) of there? Also looking for a good place to stay near the station (preferably with a good communal bath).

There's an interesting restored castle garden at Akoojoo (east of Okayama) I learned about in Niwa magazine. Eastern Shikoku also seems to have a lot of interesting stuff (including that biggest pine tree).

I'm already worried about what we'll miss! So much to see.....

Lee


 o
RE: Big Trees in Japan --- Cool Website

Could someone explain what the significance of the ropes (and the things attached to them)tied around some of those trees is ?


 o
RE: Big Trees in Japan --- Cool Website

Here's a site with info about some Japanese customs. The ropes with white zig-zag attachments are Shinto symbols, shimenawa, and they guard sacred places and trees.

Here is a link that might be useful: Japan info


 o
RE: Big Trees in Japan --- Cool Website

Ah, thanks Gardner, that was some interesting info. I've seen those on Torri before, and on Sumo wrestlers, never made the connection.


 o
RE: Big Trees in Japan --- Cool Website

Lee - Sounds like you're going to have a great old time.. and don't forget to post pics for us poor saps stuck in the western hemispheres :)

Jack


 o
RE: Big Trees in Japan --- Cool Website

Old trees abound around temples and shrines for sure. I'm lucky enough to live near two mountains festooned with old growth forests. One is a sugi (cedar) forest and the other a broad leaf evergreen forest. Here's a kusunoki (Cinnamoma camphor v. japonica) growing in the later. It's the biggest one I've seen in the wild here, but some temple specimens rival it for size:

Image hosted by Photobucket.com


 o
RE: Big Trees in Japan --- Cool Website

Amazing tree! Amazing site!

Thanks to all (especially Lee for starting this)

Lee, send me an application. I want to work for someone who will send me to Japan, better yet to really study J-gardens!

Hugs
Scott


 o
RE: Big Trees in Japan --- Cool Website

Thanks, Tom (Plantfreak) for the great tree portrait. Do you live near Yakushima? That looks like a great destination if you have some days to roam around.

Hi Scott! :) I'm just trying to win the "Boss of the Year" award. Actually, somebody else paid for my first trip to Japan 30 years ago, and it suddenly seemed like a good time to pass on the favor! Plus, I have my own self interest at heart --- it's more fun to work with people who are willing to learn how to say things like "monkey butt" in Japanese.

Lee


 o
RE: Big Trees in Japan --- Cool Website

The solanum cultivating monkey has quite a chafed butt


 o
RE: Big Trees in Japan --- Cool Website

  • Posted by yama 7b Ga (My Page) on
    Fri, Nov 10, 06 at 0:44

Hi all

joefronsd
The rope you asked is called "shimenawa". It is things of Shinto. why Shinto things at Buddhist temple ? . It is long story and I will explain later.
mike y


 o
RE: Big Trees in Japan --- Cool Website

Yama san, thankyou for the correct Japanese word. I just spent 1/2 an hour looking at all the different examples online. There sure are many types!


 o Post a Follow-Up

Please Note: Only registered members are able to post messages to this forum.

    If you are a member, please log in.

    If you aren't yet a member, join now!


Return to the Japanese Gardens Forum

Information about Posting

  • You must be logged in to post a message. Once you are logged in, a posting window will appear at the bottom of the messages. If you are not a member, please register for an account.
  • Please review our Rules of Play before posting.
  • Posting is a two-step process. Once you have composed your message, you will be taken to the preview page. You will then have a chance to review your post, make changes and upload photos.
  • After posting your message, you may need to refresh the forum page in order to see it.
  • Before posting copyrighted material, please read about Copyright and Fair Use.
  • We have a strict no-advertising policy!
  • If you would like to practice posting or uploading photos, please visit our Test forum.
  • If you need assistance, please Contact Us and we will be happy to help.


Learn more about in-text links on this page here