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please answer my questions on the green peas growing

Posted by loori (My Page) on
Wed, Aug 13, 08 at 11:39

Be so kind to answer a couple of questions on green peas growing. (to say the truth on the balcony not in the garden)
First question: At what temperature can I grow green peas seedlings in March or April outside the house not inside. Will any temperature suit this plant? Should I keep seedlings in a warmer place?
2) I got to know that it is possible to harvest green peas several times with 2 weeks interval. Only I don't understand should I plant new seeds into the same place where the previous vines grow into the the same holes or I should plant the new seeds in the completely new soil?
3)I got to know that peas don't like replanting, that's why they should be planted directly into the soil for complete growing period? Is it so?
4)Have some information about the fertilisers but don't know which and how much should I fertilise. Could you give the number and time of fertilising as well as the names?
That's all for now.

Hope to get the proper answers.
Thanks to all beforehand.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: please answer my questions on the green peas growing

1) Peas tolerate pretty cold weather. I plant mine as soon as the ground can be worked in very earliest spring -- planted them this year the last weekend in March here in Michigan. They had a few light snowfalls on them, which didn't hurt them a bit. You have about a four week window of optimal timing in early spring to plant -- if you plant them too late, they won't do as well.

2) You can go ahead and replant a second, fall crop in the same exact place you planted the spring crop, assuming the first crop didn't seem to have a lot of root rots or similar diseases. Long term, it's good to rotate your crops, though.

3) You can transplant peas quite successfully from cell packs, peat pots, etc., as long as you don't disturb the roots too much during the process. The key is to plant three to four peas in a cell pack, so that they'll make a nice, full rootball which will pop out cleanly and easily. And, they should be transplanted before they get over about four inches tall, or they become a tangled mess. But, really, they grow so easily direct seeded, that overall, it's probably not worth the effort to grow transplants.

4) Peas fix their own nitrogen, and a LEGUME INNOCULANT made for peas will help them. Many garden centers and most mail order seed catalogs carry this stuff. Also, any good fertilizer which is relatively balanced should be fine for them. I usually just use something like a 12-12-12 or 19-19-19 on my vegetable garden, making three to four to as many as five or six applications, depending upon the crop. I do the first one just before I am ready to plant in very early spring, another when things are up and about four weeks old, then repeat every two or three weeks for the crop's life. I can't tell you exactly what rate, I just take some in a bucket and scatter it about until it looks "right," something you learn by trial and error over the years. Then, I like to water it in. I often try to put it down just before a rain to accomplish this.


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RE: please answer my questions on the green peas growing

Thank you for your knowledgeable answers. Though I haven't understood them perfectly well. Namely, in your answer N2 you write that fall crop can be planted in the same exact place you planted the spring crop, assuming the first crop didn't seem to have a lot of root rots or similar diseases. Then should I tear out the old vines with the roots and sow new seeds into the old holes or should I sow the fall seeds into or next to the old holes? If the last is true then isn't it too much of plants for the same area of soil?
In your answer N4 I didn't get what you mean by saying 'Also, any good fertilizer which is relatively balanced should be fine for them. I usually just use something like a 12-12-12 or 19-19-19 on my vegetable garden, making three to four to as many as five or six applications, depending upon the crop.' I don't understand what the numbers 12-12-12 or 19-19-19 as well as the phrase 'making three to four to as many as five or six applications' mean. Could you give additional explanations?
Thanks o lot.


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RE: please answer my questions on the green peas growing

Loori. If I understand you correctly, you are wanting to grow English peas ( the shelling kind) in containers on your balcony. You are aware that production per plant is fairly low. Snap peas will give you more bang for your buck.
If you are using a commercial planting mix, with fertilizer incorporated, then there is little need to fertilize. English peas or snap peas are not heavy feeders. For open field planting I use one application of 5-10-15 at 300 lbs/acre. The first number is nitrogen and you want to use a low nitrogen fertilizer on peas and beans.
They can be seeded anytime the soil is not frozen or likely to freeze. Frosts don't bother them. If using succession planting, cut or pull the old vines when replanting.


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RE: please answer my questions on the green peas growing

Thanks a lot dear farmerdilla!But I still have some additional questions: you explained what the first number means, but you didn't explain what the second and third numbers mean, as well it is not clear what kind of measurement do they represent, is it grams?

Does planting of the seeds directly into the soil provide a guarantee of the seedlings growing or it is better to grow the seedlings in a wet cloth at home in warm temperatures?


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RE: please answer my questions on the green peas growing

Loori, there are no guarantees in life or gardening. There are a few plants that do better transplanted, everything else I direct seed. English peas can be planted very thick ( high population density) 1-2 inches apart in rows 8- 10 inches apart. Individual plants give very long yields so it take a lot of them.

The three numbers on fertilizers represent the three major construction materials that a plant uses to grow. They are a percentage by weight of the amount of material available to the plant. The first number represents Nitrogen , the second number Phosphorus and the third number Potassium.
5-10-10 for example would make available 5 lbs of Nitrogen and 10 lbs each of Phosphorus and Potassium for each 100 lbs of fertilizer. There are other materials such as Calcium, Magnesium, Boron, Iron, sulphur etc that are used in small amounts and are called trace elements. "Complete" fertilizers will also have these in the appropriate amounts.


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RE: please answer my questions on the green peas growing

Thanks but having some more questions:
1) please give the average number of seeds that can be sown into the container with 20 cm depth, 25 cm width and 70 cm length. I know that it depends on the kind of peas. Let's take snap peas for an example.
2)if I use newly bought planting mix one year, what shall I do with this mix next year? May I plant new peas next year into the same planting mix?
3) if I use one half of the earth from the former garden site + planting mix, should I still fertilise this mixture or let it be as it is. In order to kill any infections I can freeze this mixture or heat it in an oven. What could you say about it?
4) can I buy any tall sticks or trellis specially for peas supporting, taking into account the maximum height of this plant? Or should I tailor something for this purpose myself?
Thanks


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RE: please answer my questions on the green peas growing

And one more question about mulching. What kind of mulching the peas is the best one and when to start and to finish this mulching?


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RE: please answer my questions on the green peas growing

1. I am not a container grower so I can only translate from in ground planting. With dwarf peas ( either English or snap 150- 200 seeds. 75- 100 for tall growing peas like Sugar Snap.
2. If you have no soil borne diseases show, add a little ferilizer and top off with some fresh mix and you should be good to go.
3. If you using amounts small enough to bake in oven, I would forego that exercise and just use growing medium.
4. Dwarf peas will be self supporting. Tall peas, you would need some sort of trellis.
5. I would not even think of mulching when using a growing medium. Besides those plants are going to be very close together.


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RE: please answer my questions on the green peas growing

1)The last respondent gave an appoximate number of seeds, is it for your garden area? Because for the cotainer it sounds too much.
2) Then you mentioned growing medium. Do you mean growing mix or planting mix?
3)How may kilos or grams does one pea plant give in a crop?

Thank you


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RE: please answer my questions on the green peas growing

1. They can be planted 1 inch apart in rows 8 inches apart. You do the math.

2. I mean a growing medium like Pro-mix, Miracle Gro, Jungle Mix, or the equivalent.

3. best yield about 100 peas for each pea planted. Most of the time it will be considerably less.


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