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Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Posted by macmex 6b (My Page) on
Wed, Sep 26, 07 at 13:09

Hey folks,

I thought I'd start a thread on this bean, as it is quite an interesting variety. A couple of us received seed of Insuk's Wang Kong from Gardenweb member Jim Wright and have trialed it this year. This is basically a Scarlet Runner bean, but with Korean roots. I believe the Wright's source originally told them that they thought it was brought from China. Anyway, here's what I've observed:

1) This has the largest seed of any runner bean I've ever seed. The seed is about twice the size of regular runner bean seed.

2) Insuk's Wang Kong flowers very profusely. It produced a cloud of red flowers in my garden this year.

3) This bean is remarkably heat tolerant for a runner bean. Most runner beans which I've grown would probably have done alright in NJ, but not here in Oklahoma. I grew some runner beans in the high desert of Hidalgo Mexico, in the 90s, as an experiment. They tolerated alkaline conditions but wouldn't make seed due to the dry air conditions and hot days we experienced. I believe Insuk's Wang Kong has a chance at making seed in, what are to runner beans, a hostile environment.

Unfortunately, we had over 1 1/2 months of 100 degree F. plus days, just as mine were setting on pods. The plants survived for about a month and then gave up the ghost. When I shelled the pods I had very little seed, and most of it was not properly matured. I will, however, try to get this one in earlier and later, next year. I do believe it can make it here. Jim has reported to me that some have had success in AZ!

While I don't expect to produce a heavy surplus of snaps with this variety, it is truly beautiful and would be tasty for sure. I didn't dare eat these beans, but once, I did try one raw pod. It was sweet and tender.

Jim and Chris, chip in here and give us some feedback, okay?

George
Tahlequah, OK


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

George
was worried about the effect your long hot period had on the Beans. Our cool temperatures this year had the opposite effect on our beans as they are significantly larger than the ones I sent you. Some are actually twice the size. If you want I can send you some of this years crop.


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Jim also sent seed to me this year (a generous quantity, I might add) and I planted a 30-foot row. The plants were much more vigorous than other runner beans I have grown, even as seedlings. They quickly climbed to the top of their 6-foot trellis, beating all of my other pole beans.

The flowers were red, and began in about 30 days, eventually covering the vines. The flower stalks were unusually long, some nearly 12". My experience paralleled George's; while most runner beans I have grown drop blossoms in the heat of my Midwest summer, Insuk's Wang Kong began to set pods almost immediately, and continued to do so even in 80 degree heat. The vines eventually produced a heavy pod load.

I tested the immature pods both raw, and cooked as snaps. The flavor was very good either way.

I too had a close call... a record-setting early frost hit my garden last week, killing some plants, and damaging most others to some degree. Fortunately, while most of my pole beans (including the runners) lost foliage, they were not killed, and are now ripening pods at a furious pace. So far, I have harvested several pounds of dry seed.

The seeds are indeed very large, some over 1" dry. Insuk's Wang Kong appears to be a land race, with wide variation in color; a few are the half-black/half-purple most common in scarlet runner beans, but others are all black, and the majority - well over 50% - are almost completely purple. I will be

This row also did double-duty as part of my inoculant experiment; half of the row was inoculated, half was not. So far, there appears to be little difference


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Zeedman, in my experience runner beans almost always have that kind of variation in the seed coat, and planting seeds of any of the different appearances seems not to select for them. They all still crop up.

I had not mentioned it, but yes, this bean did practically jump out of the ground, grabbing the poles with its momentum. I will certainly plant it earlier in 2008. But I'll also try a mid June planting with hopes that it survives to flower in the fall. Our current conditions are so ideal that some beans & tomatoes, which barely survived the heat wave are now making a comeback.

Jim, that's REALLY BIG SEED! Wow! (I'll e-mail you privately.)

George


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Please, do tell, what's a land race, as in *Insuk's Wang Kong appears to be a land race*?


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

..."what's a land race?"

A good question. As I understand it, a land race is a cultivated plant (usually native to particular region) that either developed naturally, or was created over time by indigenous farmers using natural selection (as opposed to modern breeding methods). Land races are generally not considered to be "varieties", since their genetic makeup can be diverse & unstable. As a rule, there is more variation plant-to-plant than we have come to expect from our over-bred, highly-selected modern varieties.

This variability can express itself through seed coat color, hence my conclusion that Insuk's Wang Kong could be a land race.

Land races often have no names to the peoples that develop them, or are known by a general name (such as "the white bean"). When they are collected & cultivated far outside their original region, they are often given new names, and the lines can get a little blurred. Some knowledge of the cultivar's history is is then necessary to distinguish it as a land race. The difference is really only important to breeders (and collectors), since the genetic variability inherent to a land race can be useful for developing new varieties. Some land races are (or may become) "heirlooms", as could be the case if this bean becomes more widely circulated... which I feel is likely.

George, having lived in the area where runner beans are indigenous, you have probably seen far more of them than I have... but there is a good chance that many of them were also land races. I have grown a few of them, such as Tucomares Chocolate, that exhibited the same variability we are discussing. But most of the modern varieties that I grew were very stable, other than the occasional solid or reversed colors so common in bi-colored beans.

Crossing (which has proven to be a persistent problem with runner bean seed obtained through exchanges) complicates things even further. If a variety has excessive variability, is it inherent to the variety, or is it the result of crossing due to improper isolation? No way to tell I suppose, unless seed from another source proves to be pure (as was the case for a pole bean I regrew this year) or a detailed description of the variety can be found.

In some cases (such as some heirloom limas) different varieties were grown together for so long, and crossed so heavily, that they can no longer be separated into the original varieties... in essence, becoming a new land race. Given the ease with which runner beans can cross, it is likely that similar genetic stews have been created in areas where they are widely cultivated.

I will be maintaining both the original line, and attempting to create a pure line from the predominantly-purple seed. Hopefully, Rodger's cages will work with runner beans, to allow me to inbreed each plant. If successful, I'll soon find out whether the variability is inherent. It may turn out that the variability of Insuk's Wang Kong is its strength.


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

For some years I used to travel regularly through some of the more remote parts of the Sierra of Puebla, Veracruz and Hidalgo (Mexico). Especially in the Sierra north of Puebla there are LOTS of runner beans which often grow wild along the roadside. The farmers there grow them in their corn, and also on trees and bushes. I loved looking at the beans for sale in the local indigenous markets. Never did I find the exact same mix of seed colors. They were different every time. The name used for runner beans there is "Acalete."


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Y'all ain't kidding when you say they shoot out of the ground. I planted some last week and they are 3 inches tall now. I am hoping to make a few before we get a hard frost.


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

George
The Beans for Sandhill Preservation are in the mail. I didn't send you any as of yet since the ones I had were not unlike those I've already sent you. My initial discription of this years crop being much larger was in error.I was looking at freshly harvested seed and not dry beans. If you still want some seeds I will send them,that also applies to Glenn Drowns as well.
I think hairymooseknuckles lives in Texas,near Waco. If so I'm happy that he has planted some of the seeds this Fall. His results should be of interest to you and this board.
George,you and Chris(Zeedman) taking an interest in this Bean is very rewarding to me. The Mrs and I are getting older and I had felt that it would be a shame to lose this Bean. I had sent them to others but like ourselves they probably just grow them and eat them


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Yes, I am near Waco, Texas. I only planted a few because I wasn't sure if I had time for a harvest before we get a freeze here. I have a picture and as soon as I can figure out how to post it, I will do so.


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Jim, you mention you sent some beans to Sand Hill... Will they be selling them next season, or will they be growing it out to increase seed quantity before offering them for sale? This sounds like something I'd like to try in my climate.


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

fliptx
I'm not sure what Sand Hill will do with them. I sent them as a request by macmex. PM me with your address and I'll send you some.


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Glenn Drowns, at Sandhill Preservation is interested in trialing the bean, for possible sale. It might take a while for them to get in the catalog. He used to enjoy growing runner beans, when he lived in Idaho, but they haven't done well for him in IA. So, when I told him how well they were doing for me, he was excited about trying them. Once Glenn and Linda offer a seed in their catalog they try to never lose it. It may not get in the catalog every year, but they try to keep it and offer it from time to time.

I believe Insuk's Wang Kong will do much better in IA than here in OK; and I haven't given up on it here. Here in Oklahoma timing is of utmost importance, as we have a virtual "no grow" season, right in the middle of the summer. Few plants produce during that extra hot time. Many simply die. But on either end of that "no grow" season we have some good gardening weather.

Jim, thanks for sending those seeds to Sandhill Preservation. I can make do with the rest of what you already sent me.

George


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Jim I dropped you a line. Thanks for the offer. :)

George - I hear ya. I gave up trying to grow most things during July and August here. Even June can be kind of persnickety. The tricky part is we can go from "late freak frost" to "hot enough to make blossoms drop" in just a few weeks. Usually I plant cool-soil-tolerant beans at the end of February to early March. If there's a freak frost in April, I cover the bush beans and cross my fingers for the pole beans. So for "insurance" purposes maybe I'll start a few of Jim's beans in pots, to plug in to any spots where I lose in-ground plantings.


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Since this discussion is ongoing, I thought that a photo would be helpful.

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Insuk's Wang Kong

This is a 6 & 1/2 foot trellis, in early September. Runner beans are poorly adapted here; most lack vigor, and climb poorly. "Insuks", as you can see, had no such problem.

Note the long flower stalks... Rodger, if you are out there, this reminds me of one of the long-stemmed lima photos you posted earlier this summer. While blossoming slowed down after pod set, it never stopped until the vines were hit by an early frost. Fortunately for me, the frost only killed off some of the foliage; the vines survived, and the seed harvest still continues (over 4 pounds so far).

My camera battery is charging, I'll post a photo of the dry beans shortly.


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

That's a beautiful pic, Zeedman. I don't think I've ever seen that many flowers at once, although admittedly I'm still a bean newbie.

You said the pic was taken in Sept. When did you plant?


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

The seeds were planted June 16th, and blossoms began about 30-35 days later. Initially, it was heavier than what you see in the photo above; at that point, there are a lot of pods set, and the flowers were beginning to reduce in number. But due to those long spikes, flowering still continued from top to bottom.

I have grown runner beans that flowered more heavily. "Black Coat" (which I grew last year) almost glowed during its peak, it was so covered with blossoms. But that lasted only about 30 days or so... once pod set began, flowering dropped off rapidly.

This is the photo of the dry beans:
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Heavy rains damaged some of the seed (those with reddish or orange discoloration) but I can't cull them out yet. This variety was part of my inoculant experiment, so I need the total weights of the two lots.


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Those are great looking seeds! Bean seed is by far my favorite to collect.

Speaking of the seeds...

I was looking up Phaseolus coccineus in the Plant Files and some are listed as have poisonous seed. Others are mentioned as edible. Sometimes they're listed as poisonous while feedback replies mention eating them. I'm all mixed up.

Can these be eaten as dried beans? Not that I'd be able to grow enough in my wee garden to make it worthwhile, but I'm curious.


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

fliptx
We've been eating them as dried beans for 18 years. In fact its the only way we eat them. The Mr's soaks them overnight and then steams them. She says they remind her of Chesnuts. She mixes a concoction of sesame oil,soy sauce and hot pepper then gets out her chopsticks and start dipping. I prefer them cooked with rice in the Rice Cooker.


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Actually, even the seeds of common snap beans are moderately poisonous if eaten raw. It's just that as Americans, we seldom eat them that way - we cook everything. But in Europe, where they are accustomed to eating favas semi-raw, some try to eat bean seeds the same way & get ill. Lima beans are even more toxic raw... fortunately, the cooking process destroys the toxins.

Personally, I always blanch shellies (of any legume species) before cooking them. It sets the skin color somewhat, and lessens skin cracking. It also removes some of the complex sugars that cause flatulence... after freezing large quantities, the water in the kettle looks like syrup. It might also assist in removing toxins... but to the best of my knowledge, they are mainly broken down by the heat.

After blanching, I can cook them immediately (I prefer steaming) but if frozen or placed in the refrigerator overnight prior to cooking, the skin will soften considerably. I haven't tried "Insuk's" as a shelly, but since other runner beans have thick skins, it might benefit from this method.


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Have you tried these beans as snap beans?

Zeedman, how is production of this bean as compared to Scarlet or Painted Lady runner beans in your garden?

I am asking you because your zone is approximately the same as mine and I am looking for a good runner bean for my garden.

Dean


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Dean, this is a remarkable runner bean, and the snaps are tasty; but its yield will never equal P. vulgaris in our climate. It does, however, out-perform all of the other runner beans that I have tried. Since I have not grown "Painted Lady", I can't vouch for that comparison.

In cool Maritime climates such as the Pacific Northwest (where common pole beans struggle) the yield & quality would be considerably higher, and it would be worth growing for its snaps.

If you want to grow a runner bean specifically, as for edible landscaping perhaps, then "Insuk's" would probably be your best choice. But if you want snaps in the Midwest, P. vulgaris varieties would be the better choice.


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Zeedman, now that you mention it, I do remember reading that about raw snap bean seeds. Thanks for the info!


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Anyone grow these beans in partial shade?

I am looking for a good runner bean for two spots in my yard, front and back by an alley, these spots are partial shade. I want something that would be a edible landscape, where the flowers look nice.

I just removed two large bushes and two smaller pine trees in the front yard, so I have some room for a nice looking beans.

Dean


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Dean
We usually plant a few of these beans in Pots and place them on the side of the driveway for cosmetic purposes and a few extra beans. In fact most of my gardening is in pots,especially my 15-20 tomatoes. The wife uses our small 24x32ft garden for onions and peppers. Back to the pots,using 5ft tall fencing with 2x4 inch rectangle from Lowes or HD I fabricate a cage that is at least 6 inches larger in diameter than the pot. It is easy to heighten the cage. I plant 15-20 tomatoes each year using this method. This works well with the beans as they will grow over and down the cage with flowery vines. Looks like one big ball of flowers. As far as them growing in partial shade,no problem. Some of mine grow in the shade of 2 peach trees and actually we are not blessed with an abundance of sunshine here in the Puget Sound area,overcast,clouds and rain dominate our weather except for July and August.

If you want to try these beans e-mail me your address and I'll be happy to send you some. Don't worry about the postage.


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

How big of pots did you use?
How many seeds per pot?
What kind of soil did you use?

I have access to unlimited farmer soil(very black) and city compost. I have some potting soil Schultz and Wal-mart brand.

This beans sounds exactly what I am looking for in a runner!

I tried the other day to send you a PM, but I got no response, could you try to send me a PM through Gardenweb?

thanks,

Dean


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Dean
Garden Web mail has never worked for me. Try hyunjun98@yahoo.com.

I have about 60 pots of various sizes the smallest being 14" in diameter at the top. We used to plant them around our covered back porch by attaching twine to the baseboard below the roof.The Mrs plants 6-9 seeds per pot.


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)-2

What kind of soil do you use in the pots?

Dean


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Those are inpressive looking beans and the long stems make the flowers show up even better. I wish I still had some green in the garden. Still waiting on some rain we have had less than an inch since first week in July. I finished taking down all the bean poles today and tomato cages still working on taking up the drip hoses. After seeing your post pictures I'm looking forward to next year. Rodger


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

My seeds arrived from Jim. Lordy! I'm going to give my self a hernia planting them next year, they're so big. Ok, that's an exaggeration... but only a little.


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

fliptx
"I'm going to give myself a hernia planting them next year,they're so big."

Are you by chance related to the former Will Rodgers from up in Oklahoma? He was well known for his tall stories and wild exaggerations.

Jim


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

To quote another Will, "Will Sonnett" (Walter Brennan)... "No brag, just fact." ;-)

These beans are whoppers.


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Zeedman
You mentioning Rodgers Lima beans jogged my memory and
in looking at your photo of the beans I did not see a white one. This year I made certain that when I planted seed that there were no white ones planted and the end result was no white beans produced. For others not familiar with what I'm talking about,over the years we've had an occasional white flowered bean with the exact characteristics as the Insuk bean except they were possibly all white. We were never careful as to the color of the bean we planted. being backward gardeners we just thought that a bean is a bean is a bean. SEE this forum is making me smarter. I'm thinking that next year, in a couple of pots, of growing the white only beans to see if they reproduce white only if the Beanie experts Macmex and Zeedman think it might be a good idea. I have a few seeds and would be willing to share if anyone was interested in a couple.


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

fliptx
Since I'm concerned about your safety while planting your overly large beans I have an idea. I had been a competitive Powerlifter for many years and during that time I've accumulated several Heavy Duty weightlifting belts. Perhaps I could send you one for Xmas.


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Jim, by all means I would recommend that you try to save the white version. I would not be a good choice for growing it out, however, due to the climate here.

George


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Jim, if we can eliminate the white variant in one generation, then chances are that it was an impurity caused by crossing. White runner beans are fairly common, so you (or your source) might have had one stubborn bee bring a small amount of pollen from a distant neighbor. That would explain the relatively small percentage of white in the saved seed. Was the white seed present from the beginning?

Assuming that purple is dominant over white, there could still be some white genes present as recessives... only time will tell. It's possible that the all-black could be separated out as well, although I suspect that will be more difficult.

For my part, I will be assuming the white to be an unwanted cross, and will attempt to eliminate it from future generations. Of the remainder, I will maintain two lines: the all-black/black & purple, and attempting to create a predominantly purple selection. It might not be a bad idea to attempt to isolate the white as a separate cultivar... but I am not planning to do so at this time. I will, however, save that seed separately for possible use in the future.


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

"I had been a competitive Powerlifter for many years and during that time I've accumulated several Heavy Duty weightlifting belts. Perhaps I could send you one for Xmas."

Hehe! Think I will pass on the belt (wouldn't match my gardening outfit) but I may get me a wheelbarrow to lift these beans.


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Woo Hoo!!! I have several small red flowers blooming! Weather is suppose to turn cooler next week with daytime temps in the 70's and night time temps in the 50's


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

hairy
Your Beans have only been out a little over 3 weeks and flowers already. Told you that you would get beans by Thanksgiving. Your projected Temperature is my normal High temperature range up here in the PNW and the beans thrive.


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Hey Moose, how are your plants doing now?


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

I had a mild freeze last week and it burnt the leaves a little. The blooms also fell off. I dunno if they will make or not. I wasn't expecting the frost. I'll keep you posted. I still have plenty of seed. I just wanted to try them because I am so excited about them.


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Dang these beans grow fast.

I planted a single seed a couple weeks ago during a cool spell as a test to see what kind of soil temps they could tolerate. We were having nights in the upper 40s/low 50s and days in the 60s.

Anyway, it came up in about 10 days. Yesterday the plant was about 8 inches tall. Today it's almost a foot high. This morning I took note that it had reached the bottom of the first rung of the trellis. When I went back a couple hours later, it had reached the top of that rung--about an inch.


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

flip
I hope you accomplished this without getting a hernia or hurting your back. The weightlifting belt is still available.
Jim


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Jim, nope, no hernia--I think lifting one bean at a time is the trick. A handful all at once might do me in. I don't know what I'll do come harvest time.


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Flip
How is your lone bean growing? I'm getting older(70)and forgetful but your growing efforts brought back memories of a story I read in the 1st grade. It was called Flip and the beanstalk...or was it Jack and the Beanstalk? Or maybe Flip had a brother named Jack,I just can't seem to remember. Any Giants live in your neighborhood?


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Jim, if I climb to the top of this thing and find a goose that lays golden eggs, you'll get a cut of the profits.

It's about 18" tall now, and putting out a bunch of nice big leaves. I can only imagine how fast these suckers will grow when I actually get a little sunlight in the spring time.


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

"...Any Giants live in your neighborhood?"

No Giants live in Houston, but they sometimes visit Dallas on Sundays. ;-)

Sorry, I just couldn't resist.


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Heh heh, Zeedman.

That reminds me... My lone plant is still doing well. It's not growing as fast now, with the almost total lack of sunlight in that part of the garden. But I do see some little beginnings of buds, so the plant is a real trooper.


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Very interesting beans. Would any of you send me a few seeds ? I'll try to grow them in my garden. Thank you.

April9


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

That one plant I mentioned above died during one of several very windy days we had this winter.

I began planting again ten days ago. Two of the new plants are already three inches tall.


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Flip,

Maybe I should plant a few as well. I was kinda waiting till the frost was over. I was thinking around early march, but I might go ahead and plant a few now as well.


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

I was wondering-if I sent a SASE to one of you kind people, could you spare a few for zone 10? I wouldn't plant till august/September because it wants coooler days, so it's not a rush or anything...


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

grandmotherbear
I've sent you a PM via this forum offering you some seeds. Don't worry about the postage.
Jim


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

A note for southern growers of SCARLET RUNNER BEAN the species. This info may help some of you develop methods of growing Insuk's Wang Kong in more areas.

First note is that it often winters over in this climate and returns from the roots next spring... would probably take no more than 3-4 inches of pine needles to pull them thru here, and those of you in other climates might consider trying a "breathable" mulch over your plants. I have had it survive one mild (for us) winter in a concrete underlined planting nitch, which is the only place I have cold enough for French Tarragon to survive here.

Theoretically, this species does NOT set seed when the temperatures are over 90 degrees. I have grown it 3-4 times over 30 years, just as decorative vine, and that has been my experience. it will not survive in "naturalized" plantings here, such as in old orchards to find its way up nearly-dead apple trees.

Since it evolved as a cooler rain forest plant, that may mean that it can tolerate more shade (at least here in Zone 7 and farther south) than we might suspect. Following story will interest anybody trying to grow in hot climates:

Soil in this case was ... for both of us... a rocky clay of low fertility, with Ph that's above 6 because the rocks are limestone and chert.

I gave seeds of the old familiar Scarlet Runner to a neighbor from western New York one year. Being a non-gardener and unaware of theoretical sun requirements, she planted it where she wanted her blooming vines.... ran it up wires on the NORTH side of an old School bus, further high shaded by large old native oaks. Water was available, and she took very good care of her beans, but they got maybe 2-3 hours slanted late afternoon sun at the most.

To my surprise, they grew fine, bloomed all summer just as well as mine trellised on carport metalwork in afternoon sun, and neither of us got any beans until after mid-September, when the day temps dropped to 90 degrees. Then we had beans set, with a marginal amount of seeds to save because the frost date here is middle to late October.

Hummingbirds were very happy... bumblebees also visited them.

Hope this info on the commonest form of this species will suggest trials that might be useful to others of you.

Jan... greentongue

If anybody would like a "rough draft" of my 1998 - 2002 unexpergated database notes on Scarlet Runner experience, request thru my posted email address.


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

jwr6404-I sent you an email. My email info at Gardenweb is outdated...


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Jan, thanks for the advice. I've got some growing in a container that I can move to shadier area when it gets warmer.

Jim, remember the last time we discussed this I said the plants were a foot high? They're now three and four feet high. Eager little beavers!


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

I am getting a "bean" education here. I thought runner beans were ONLY ornamental plants. That bean plant with the pretty red blossoms is gorgeous. I would love to grow some of those just for the beauty of the vine. As far as your experiment goes though, I wouldn't be much help since I have about the same climate as George "macmex".


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

jwr6404,
I came cross to this post and learned a lot about beans. I really like the people here. Do you mind to share with me some wong kong seeds? I have already grown purple, green long beans, several pole beans, bush beans, soybeans and fava beans. I also have a long bean (~1 foot long) bush type I brought back from China to share with you if you are interested.
New gardener


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Newgardener, I am also interested in a trade for your Chinese bush long bean, if you have enough seed available. You don't enable email, so please review my exchange list, and contact me through my Member Page if you might be interested.


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Zeeman,
Sure. I sent you an email.

New gardener


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

jwr6404,

A little over two more months before I can plant my seeds. I am biting at the bit. Thanks again for all of my seeds!

Dean


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

For a bit of trivia, Wang Kong means in Korean "king bean."

"Insuk" is likely a male first name (or very old-style female name).


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

sparklenj
Insuk is my 69 year old Korean wife's name and Wang Kong is indeed korean for King Bean. My wife recalled eating beans of this type as a little girl in Korea and that is how macmex,zeedman decided on the name.


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

I had not heard that part of the story. I am a genealogist and I love it when a surname "lives on" even if it is in the name of a bean.

I am laughing a little here since my grandmother's surname was "Bean". Her brothers all died young before having children, and her father's brothers all changed there spelling to "Beene" so my Bean died out, but your "Insuk Wang Kong" lives on. Carol


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Carol
Another part of the story concerning the name. I've never stated the Beans originated in Korea. To put it into perspective,timeline,my wife is 69 and I'm soon to be 71. We got the seeds from an elderly(now deceased) Korean friend in 1988/1989 and he in turn got them from an older Korean friend some 25 years earlier who may have brought them from China. I have no reason to doubt/dispute the story concerning it's source prior to receieving the Beans from our friend. He had planted them,off and on, in his yard for the Flowers and to maintain the seed.Knowing we garden and would provide him beans for consumption he gave us the seeds. Zeedman/macmex realizing the Beans had been perpetuated in Korean hands felt it should have a name associated with Korea. I mentioned that my wife recalled Beans of this type as a small girl and they were called Wang Kong.They decided that would be a good name. I suggested,and they concurred,that my wife's name be included ,hence Insuks Wang Kong, or as sparklenj states Insuks "King Bean".


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

  • Posted by jll0306 10 High Desert (My Page) on
    Sat, Mar 22, 08 at 15:56

King Bean Report:

We had freezing temperatures the night before I planted my first group of beans, but it's spring in the high desert, and although we have not yet hit a consistent 50 degrees at night, our 24 hour temperature range has been bounceing from 40 to the eighties.

I did a mass planting in a tall kichen garbage can by my fence (to keep them above Bunnie height) and then went around and stuck one or two in random other places.

As I expected, the one in a pot against my south wall sprouted first at about 10 days. The ones in the ground, about two feet from the south wall spouted about 3 days later.

The ones by the fence were the last to come up. One of the hazards of spring gardening here is high wind, so I kept the level of dirt about ton inches below the rim, hoping to protect them while they are young and tender. Consequently, they were somewhat more shaded than the others, however they are all popping now, 17 days later.

I have also started another half-dozen inside to see if they transplant well.

Thanks, Jim, I'm having great fun with these.

Jan


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Just a note from over here about planting runner beans. If your soil is slow to warm up in the Spring runner beans transplant fine from indoor sowings. I can get plants set out two to three weeks earlier from an indoor sowing. They do best if planted out when they have one or two pairs of true leaves maximum, as if they are any taller they tend to get knocked about by our weather before they get a chance to start climing under their own steam. In my climate snails and slugs are a major problem and so the runners stand a better chance if I plant out plants rather than sow in situ. I usually put out my runners in four lots. The first batch I sow indoors and are a bit of a risk when I put them out (around mid May) because the weather might turn nasty and I'll lose them. The next lot I plant outdoors 2 weeks later or so. In bad Springs the first lot are no earlier than the second to fruit but it's always worth a gamble. At the same time I sow a batch straight into the ground outdoors. Finally, I'll direct sow another batch about 2 weeks after that. That way I get a crop which begins around early July and can go on until frost (anywhere from early October to nearly Christmas). As you can see our climate is incredibly unpredictable and we have to garden a lot more by experience than the calendar.


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Hi,

jwr, that's good to know that Insuk is indeed a Korean lady's name :) btw, I was not meaning to imply that anyone is "old" -- I can only hope to make it that far. Long live Insuk's wang kong! I will now try to find your seed offer and would love to try growing some - Thank you!


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Jim,
Thank you very much for the seeds. They are the biggest beans I have ever seen! I planted them in yesterday. Now watch it grow!
New gardener


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

I've just scrolled up to the photo to check the size of these beans and then went downstairs and measured my Painted Lady beans from last year's crop. (Am I turning into a runner bean nerd, or what?) I found that my beans are the same size as the IWK, generally about an inch minimum. This is after a winter sitting in an old ice cream tub beside the kitchen range so presumably they have shrunk a bit. If you are not used to runner beans they must look very big but this is a normal kind of size for them. As for my storage method I wouldn't recommend it. It's pure laziness but they always seem to come up fine. I won't be sowing them for a few weeks yet.


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Flora, it's worth mentioning that my growing conditions are very far from optimal, for runner beans. The original seed, grown in the maritime Northwest (very similar conditions to the U.K.) was slightly larger. It may well be true, that grown under your conditions, IWK would be nothing special... it's ability to succeed in more hostile conditions, however, is what makes IWK remarkable.

"(Am I turning into a runner bean nerd, or what?)"

From one legumaniac to another... yes. ;-)


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Jim,
Received the beans today in the mail. Wow they are big and look tasty. Thank you!


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

  • Posted by jll0306 10 High Desert (My Page) on
    Sun, Apr 13, 08 at 12:54

As promised, pictures and a report of the first planting.

The first two photos are of beans planted in a raised bed under the eves of our south face. I think of this as my experimental bed. It's outside the window by our kitchen table, I start plants here that will be moved somewhere else later but the Insuks Wang Kong beans will stay. With luck, we'll be sharing breakfast with hummers soon!

The bean in the back, twining up to window level and the one on the right side were stuck in the ground 40 days ago. When they emerged, and didn't immediately get eaten by the bunnies/crows/insects, I added the others.

Same beans, different view.

Frostbitten 40 day beans in a west facing bucket. Isn't it interesting that even in this micro-micro climate, the beans on the left against the south facing "wall" survived the frost better than the rest?


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

I just got my envelope of Insuk's from Jim in the mail today and I can't wait to get them started! I have to say-- these things are ENORMOUS-- at least 2cm long. I'm afraid they might scorch and die in the Austin summer but he sent me more than enough for experimentation. Even if they don't make it through the summer I look forward to trying a fall crop.

Thanks, Jim! And thank you, everyone on here that added some good info about growing them!


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Aloha Jim and Wang Kong Folks,

I was sent here by a cool fellow named Hairy Moose Knuckles who is growing these this year. He made a posting about growing this bean on a different garden site, which caught my eye. I've been looking for Wang Kong seeds for a while now.

There is a sizeable Korean-American community in our area of Oahu. I'd like to offer the seeds to some of these folks to perpetuate the line, and see how they perform here. Oahu has a rainforest climate on about half the island, so it is worth a try. :)

Some Asian veggie seeds may be bought here in Chinatown or Korean grocery stores. I've seen curled cress, Korean white radish, bok choy and choy sum, and occasionally, Korean melons. But not this plant's seed.

The King bean sometimes shows up dried, for food use in a Korean grocer's, but I've found those will not sprout. Possibly due to having been exposed to excess heat during shipping, or irradiated to kill pests. Who knows.

My hubby is learning to speak Korean with our neighbors. One of these nice folks was born in Korea. She misses growing some of the garden plants they had there, including the Wang Kong.

Seeing tricolor Perilla in my garden, she admired it and shared her bok choy, and Chinese water spinach seeds with me this Spring. I rooted her a Perilla cutting. :)

I think it would be fun to grow 2 or 3 of these Korean Scarlet Runners myself for the lovely flowers, and to share seeds with this kind lady. (My garden is tiny. Insuk's Wang Kong would be planted in a pot on my 6' x 4' balcony and the vines allowed to climb the railing and/or dangle downward.)

I am new to bean growing here in Hawaii though. To make sure I don't kill them all I will share my excess seeds with any of the locals who are interested.

If you'd like to trade seeds, I still have excess water spinach (ung choy) to share, and also the following:
new zealand spinach
Udumalapet eggplant (8 seeds)
leonitis leonurus (ornamental medicinal),
native Hawaiian red currant tomato (very similar to Mexico Midget but more disease resistant),
Fall 2007 seeds-
Ararat basil,
pacific beauty calendula (edible and medicinal flower),
nasturtium jewel mix (edible flowers and leaves).
several kinds of hot peppers (ask for list if interested)


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

grovespirit
The Bean,now known as Insuk's Wang Kong is not the bean in your Local Korean markets.My Korean wife(69) and I(71) have been growing it for 19 years. I provided our ages as it is relative to the history with us. We got the seed from an elderly(Now Deceased)Korean friend of ours.He had gotten them from an older Korean friend of his some 25 years earlier who may/may not have gotten them in China. Our friend grew them for the flower appeal,a few beans for consumption and to maintain the seed. He gave us all his seed and the wife has continuously grown them. Since they had neen propagated and maintaind in Korean families George(macmex) and Zeedman thought a Korean name would be appropriate. If you would like some seed PM me.
Jim


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Hey Jim,

I would love a few to try, if you please. I am a seed saver.
That's a wonderful background story about the beans. That needs to be stored with the seeds that anyone gets from you to document their history.
Sending you an e-mail.

~ sweetannie4u


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Jim,
Thanks for telling me about this post, learned alot from it. Cant wait for those seeds you sent me to arrive. I have already prepared a site along one of the walls of my garage with plenty of compost and worm castings. Built a trelis that I will mount to the wall. Then im good to go. ZEEDMAN nice photo's butiful plants and seeds.

Mark


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Jim,
Just letting you know the seeds came in. Thanks for the Insuk Wang Kong Runner Bean seed and the Adapazari Squash seed. I see why they said you could get a hyrnea from the seeds. Just prepared a bed for both seeds, will let you know how it go's.

Mark


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Is anyone from the more northern zones trying these beans out? They look beautiful and sound yummy!


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

"Is anyone from the more northern zones trying these beans out?"

Jwr6404 - the source for the variety - grows them in Washington state. I grew them in northeast Wisconsin, where they did remarkably well (see the photos I posted earlier in the thread).

Runner beans prefer cooler Summer temperatures, and usually set pods poorly in hot weather. What makes "Insuk's" special is that it tolerates more heat than most runner beans. It also is amazingly vigorous, and has huge, beautiful seeds. Quite an impressive package.


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Wow--I am rethinking my plans for next year's garden--those photos looked so beautiful!


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Jim has offered to send me some of these beans. I am teaching children between 2-5 how to grow a very small, basic garden. I had a fun idea just pop into my head while reading these posts...I am going to include a book about Jack and the Beanstalk with these beans. I think it will make it more fun for the kids.

Any tricks on picking and cooking with these beans that I can pass along to the families? Thanks Kim


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Kim,

When I was four years old my Dad purchased a packet of Scarlet Runner beans and helped me and my little brother plant them on a trellis. Before we planted them he sat us in his lap and told us the story of Jack and the Beanstalk. Then, when he pulled out those big beautiful seeds, we could hardly contain ourselves! I really hoped they would grow up into the clouds. But Dad just winked and said, "Well, not all beans do that." Still, those beautiful flowers did make it an exciting summer. At the same time He helped us to start some really large purple zinnias, which we transplanted into the same garden. Wow! To a kid, those BIG purple flowers were magical! It's always great to grow stuff which excited young imaginations.

George


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Hi--I have a question about these beautiful plants and dappled sunlight/slanted sun for about 3-4 hours a day.

Jim has very generously sent me 50 seeds. I have never sttempted to grow beans in anything but direct sun (except cornfield beans), but, more for ornamental purposes and seed saving purposes (to keep well away from my Emerites and mushroom beans, which is where I am planting more of the Wang Kong beans for yield), I am considering growing a few of these on netting along my deck.

Anyone think this will work? At the very least, if they do not set pods, they will look pretty there.

Also, my aunt has a question about these beans. If she does not support them on a trellis, will they act as a ground cover like sweet peas do? Personally, I think it is a waste of lovely poles/runners not to trellis them, but I told her I would ask. It would be a good way for me to get seed, from hers, because they would not cross with another variety, as she has not grown anything veggie in at least 20 years :D

Of course, with 50 of these seeds coming my way (thanks again Jim!) I probably will save seed from this, so seed saving will probably not be an issue until next year.


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Susan
I've grown them around my deck with twine running ip to the roofline. I also run twine to nails inserted at the 10 ft level around the back of the house where we get evening sun and they produced very well. Of course I believe the more Sun the better but then again we in the PNW aren't overwhelmed with Sunshine. Have never let them grow along the ground. To many Rabbits and Racoons plus I have a very small garden so space is at a premium. The only sprauling plant we grow is the Adapazari Squash from Turkey and we use it as landscaping plants.


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

THanks so very much! I will try them along the deck, then! I bet they will look gorgeous! They will get some slanted sun there, too!

I will pass on the info to my aunt--I don't think they will do well on the ground for her, either, as she has so many deer, abbits and the like to contend with :D


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

I am happy to report that a friend here on the board sent me a few of the seed and I was scared to death to plant them for fear that they wouldn't sprout or something would happen to them and I loved the Insuk Wang Kong story so much I wanted to be a participant in this bean preservation story too...At any rate...I did plant them, in a somewhat protected area that does get plenty of sunshine but will be ptotected from our harsh late summer temps...

Here is what they look like today and also ..the second picture is the trellis I concocted to support them....The cords are about 12 feet high (just a guesstimate but close....It was amazing to me that they didn't even need coaxing ...they started to climb on the cord immediately...

I'm excited to have some of Insuk's Wang Kong and I pray that I at least get some seed so that I can continue growing them...

Image Hosting by PictureTrail.com

Image Hosting by PictureTrail.com


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

P. S....wanted to add....please tell Insuk that I'm another 69 year old gardener...and that I have some of her beans that I'm going to pass on to my gardening daughter if I have good luck...


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

ruth
I will tell Insuk what you said. I think you are in for a surprise with the size of the bean plants.It will completely take over the area where you have them. It's a nice location,you will enjoy the flowers and I hope the Hummingbirds.
Jim


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

ruth
I forgot something. Living in a warm/hot climate I would like to suggest that you find a way to block your metal tub from the Texas Sun. The metal will absorb heat and its possible you could cook the roots. Just an opinion FWIW.
Jim


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Thanks for the advice...I can block it off. It should be OK as I grew luffa there last year and it did pretty well...it will get morning sun and up until shortly after noon and then the lower part is in the shade...a good thing as you can well imagine with our Texas heat...I will use some cedar shingles to wedge into the little corner there so that it will hide the metal...


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

MacMex said, "Before we planted them he sat us in his lap and told us the story of Jack and the Beanstalk."

Thanks MacMex for the great idea!

I have two little ones 5 and 2 and they will love the story and this will bring some meaning to planting these beans on a metal arbor. Who knows I might end up with two garden helpers yet.

thanks,

Dean


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Hi Jim,

Sounds like youve got an awesome bean on your hands! It has some great growing characteristics and a wonderful provenance to boot. With all the requests for seeds youve received this year, I dont want to deplete your stock. But, if you would please put me on the list for next years seeds, I would be most grateful. Sounds like a wonderful variety and Id love to see how it does here in Virgina.

Thanks again


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Ruthie in Texas.

I use real plants (like daylily foliage or something similar) to shade my pots in summer; for another year... if you can find those giant ornamental STYROFOAM pots that were so abundant a couple seasons ago, they insulate from both summer heat and winter cold.

My brother in Wyoming had a "cheaper idea" when I suggested it to him.... just use a big styrofoam cooler as a planter. Don't forget to poke drainage holes in the bottom.

ENJOY YOUR BEANS.... You, your grandchildren, and your hummingbirds are going to love them all summer. Don't panic if they don't set beans during summer heat.

Here in Zone 7 Arkansas, that species blooms all summer, but doesn't set beans until the temps are under 90 degrees, but you will still have time to get a seed crop in the fall.

greentongue - Arkansas Ozarks

PS: I planted 2 seeds of the beans (1 light, 1 black) on April 7 in an area of afternoon sun and almost pure chat (chopped limestone paving), but I had had the mother species grow OK there and survive the winter in that spot a decade ago.

Then we got another round of cold and wet and heavy rains. My beans didn't come up until April 22... then there they both were! They are just now ready to climb... I have wired a bamboo pole in place for each of them... and I can see a difference in stem color between them, so I think I could guess which was the black bean.

If you plant your beans next time in real soil, you will very likely find that they winter over and come up from the roots again the next year, especially if a few pine needles or other similar airy mulch lays over them.


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

I just couldn't wait to grow these and it was still a little cool now and then, so I put 5 in little cups and started them inside. Four came up looking good but the fifth one looked like it was so strong it turned itself over trying to break ground. The roots were showing, the stem was looped, but I could see leaves trying to get out. The plants grew so fast that I needed to get them outside. I moved all five of them to a flower box outside (near the ground) and ran strings up to the eaves. The fifth one came up and is now a couple of inches tall. It isn't as strong and healthy as the other four but I think it may make it. I still have some maintenance to do behind it so I had to fix it so it could be moved. The strings are attached to the box on bottom and a piece of rebar on top. The rebar is in cup hooks so I can move it all to work behind it. Man those things grow fast. I am excited. Thanks Jim. I will plant a few more when our weather is a little more stable because it looks like I will be wrapping these up tomorrow night.


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Jim sent me a generous amount. My mom has four - she grows no other beans and I wanted some to be pure for seed. She's got them on the front porch trellis with the Lady Banks rose. Already they are out of the ground. I have four at my house also on a trellis, and about half the rest went to my vegetable garden lot.

Jim - haven't forgotten that I need to send you some postage $$. Thank you so much - Chris


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Chris
There is no need,nor do I want $$ for postage. I have sent IWK and Adapazari Squash seeds all over the Country at my expense. I get a great deal of satisfaction,feeling that I,in a very small way, gave something to the Gardening community. Now,if you have an extra million or two $$ I might buy a thousand acres and plant a really big Garden.
Jim


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Thank you Jim! The seeds are beautiful...and huge. LOL Can't wait to get them planted!

Shae


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

I have been growing Scarlet Runner Beans in NJ for 5 years. The seeds came from England. They grow very well, but the flowers fall off in July. I used to think that the humming birds knocked them off. I now know it is the heat. I am trying some white seeded and white flowered runner beans this year. Will they be any better at setting pods in the heat. Also to the IWK beans really set beans in 90F weather?


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

My seeds from Jim just arrived today. Here's a pic of some of the beans he sent.


Hope to get them in the ground tomorrow. This is my first time growing runner or pole beans.

John


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Oliver, I have never grown Insuk's Wang Kong in NJ, just tried it last year, here in OK. But I grew up in NJ and also gardened there from 2002-2004. My guess is that it'll do better than any other runner bean you might have tried. Here in Oklahoma we take heat to a whole new level, compared to NJ. But last year I had them set pods at least up to 90 F. I didn't get much seed. But they set pods at that temperature. If you were to grow this one in NJ, my guess is that you might have a short hiatus in production and then they'd crank back up for you.

George
Tahlequah, OK


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

George,
Thanks for the info. I would love to try and grow some one day. I have a bunch of White Lady's (http://www.tmseeds.com/product/231.html) growing now. I am curious to see how they do in the heat.

Oliver


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

jwr6404 - We are still working on our house so I only planted those five beans. They are doing great and I can see red blooms getting ready to open. Thanks again for the seeds. Carol


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Has anyone grown them here in CT? I'd love to give them a try. The images you've all put up are really impressive. I want a bit of that happiness in my garden! :)


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

I'm growing them in zone3a. I'll report to you in September.

April9


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

I just planted these last week--they are already 5 inches tall. Wow--what a fast grower :D

Thanks again for the seed, Jim!


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Could someone send me some seeds for the Jr. Master Gardners at our community garden to plant in the fall? I'll get a large trellis set up for them this summer and they can play Jack in the Beanstalk too.

In case any of you haven't seen this either.......google "keyhole gardens" and check out this cool raised bed idea that's being used in Africa. Composting and gardening all in one bed. I also thought "bag gardening" was quite cool for use of vertical space.

TIA


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

I just wanted to say that I enjoy this bean very much. I didn't get to plant quite as many as I wanted to this spring but am so glad I tried them. I started picking in very early spring when the beans were just 3 or so inches long. I love them small and steamed. I continued to pick off the dozen or so vines and left the rest to go to seed. We will be eating pretty well this winter off those dried beans. I think I have about 3 pounds so far off a row of about 6 ft. This bean is going to take on a much larger section of the garden next year...sorry bush beans.


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Can anybody spare me a few of these for next year? They sound really cool - would love to try growing them on corn.

Will send an SASE. email me at pbrowninc@verizon.net

Thanks!


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Jim, I don't have any to spare, as I have not yet succeeded in producing seed. But I bet someone here will be able to help you out.

My late planting looks very good. But it may not make seed before frost. We'll see. If I had gotten in a late June planting, as I had planned, I bet they would have done well. Our summer was cooler and wetter than usual. Of course "cooler" is in relative terms. We still went nearly six weeks with daily temps topping over 100 F. Such is the heat and drought that many plants react as if they had just been through winter and flower. Some of our pears did this, this year.

But the weeks leading up to that 6 week "desert time" were cooler and wetter, and since that time we've had more rain and more moderate (as in ideal) temps.

George


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

  • Posted by cabrita 9b & 10a (21 & 23) (My Page) on
    Sat, Oct 11, 08 at 11:52

Thanks to Jim's generosity I am now a new member of the Insuk's Wang Kong beans club! Will be my first experience with the P. coccineus species (runner beans) and we will attempt to have them as a perennial bean. Very exciting, as we are also getting ready to plant our first perennial squash.

We will plant half of half in each garden (reserving half of them for spring planting just in case....just in case because it has been known to get to 100 here in November, and I read that the bean would not make pods above 92F?)

I understand they need fertile soil and do better in partial shade, not too hot not too cold? We already have spots in mind, somewhat shaded by other plants and in one case part of a building. I was wondering if you folks pre-soak them first in warm water or just plant directly. Any further advice?


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

george
As far as size this was my best crop ever. Send me your address again(I never save addresses) and I'll send you some more seeds.
Jim


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

  • Posted by blujen z6 wichita ks (My Page) on
    Wed, Oct 15, 08 at 22:50

Hi,
How would these do in a hot summer with high winds? I've grown Kentucky Wonder and Molly Frasier Cutshorts, and the Kentucky Wonders do great, but the Cutshorts don't do well in the wind and i'm looking for something that will produce well here in Kansas.
Thanks in advance!
-Jenny


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Jenny, I doubt that Insuk's Wang Kong would be a very good choice for your Wichita summers. It would do better than any other runner bean that I know of. But I'm almost certain that your Molly Frasier Cutshorts would do better than Insuk's Wang Kong... in your area, with the wind and heat in the summer.

I have a couple other kinds of cutshorts which have done well for me here in Tahlequah. We aren't quite as dry as you are, and we don't have quite as much wind. But we have heat! I'd recommend that you use the KY Wonders as your main bean and trial a couple others, till you find just what you want. If you REALLY want red flowers, then go ahead with Insuk's Wang Kong. But I'd recommend that you do what I did this summer. I planted late in the season and am getting a decent pod set during these cooler, more humid days. I still don't know if I'll get seed, and I did have a set back in that area, this last weekend, when one of my daughters came home from college and helped pick... a ... mess... of beans... ... for dinner!

George


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

I just had a few seeds and they grew beautifully but never set a single pod. I suspect that I got them in the ground too late.


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

My Thompson & Morgan catalog says that pole beans will develope without pollination but Runner beans require insect pollination. That might explain why they might not set pods well in late fall, if the insects are not out.

For those with late spring frosts, I use tunnels (TunLCover) for protection of early planted tomatoes and squash. They have worked for me through frosts and snow. I usually wait until after frost dates to plant beans out.


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

The husks are finally drying on mine, so I have begun saving seed for next year. They were so successful, and sooooo good eating, that I intend to plant many rows of them. Following a suggestion from someone on this forum, I'm going to try using them as windscreens to protect summer squash and bush beans (can't live without my Dragon's Tongue).

For those wondering about eating them - these were the best green beans I've grown. (Right up there with Dragon's Tongue, but a whole different taste.) Pick them before the seeds begin to swell, just as you would snap beans, and cook any way you like. You will be surprised how quickly they cook - they look like they will be tough and woody, but in fact they get tender and sweet faster than regular beans do. None of that rubbery squeaky mouthfeel, either.

I even threw some on the grill - hey, it's California, we put _everything_ on the grill - basted with olive oil and dusted with a little garlic - they were terrific. Also wonderful sauteed, with garlic or shallots, with sherry reduction and/or cream... stir-fried... etc.

We froze a few and pickled a few to see how well they keep. Anybody else try that?


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Well, frost has hit here in Tahlequah, OK for the past three mornings in a row. Yesterday I broke down and picked all the remaining Insuk's Wang Kong pods from my plants, along with pods of every other bean I still had going. I didn't manage to get seed this year. But I'm going to try again in 2009. Next time I'm going to look for a spot with some afternoon shade. We'll see.

My daughter and I were alone for dinner last night. I cooked up those IWK pods. As Albionwood mentions above, they were GOOD! They make a very meaty, sweet snap bean. I even ate some with some seed filled out and they were good too.

George


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

George, I did just the opposite of you with my Insuk's. I increased seed and ate none! I'm glad to know that the snaps cook up nice and tender because raw they seem tough and course. Now I'm eager for year's crop so I can eat them. Those seeds sure are pretty to look at.

Jim


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Hi! I'm working on planning next spring's garden here in Omaha, and I ran across some information about runner beans which eventually led me here looking for Insuk's beans.

I wonder if someone might share some of these beans with me?

Thanks!


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

David
E-mail me your address and quantity of seed you need. Don't worry about postage.
Jim


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

  • Posted by cabrita 9b & 10a (21 & 23) (My Page) on
    Thu, Nov 6, 08 at 21:10

Progress with my beans: I planted 7 of them two weeks ago and I got 3 very good looking sprouts (with leaves already), one that might have been partially eaten (I'll wait). After I planted it got to 97 F here, sometimes this happens. I planted in a somewhat protected shady area but...still. My guess is that 3 of them found it too hot, since there is some genetic variability, I am hoping I am selecting the ones that will do better in my climate. I will be planting some more in the spaces I made for them and build some taller trellises for them. The weather is now perfect for them, from what I have been reading in this thread, it even rained a couple of days ago (we all get really happy here when it rains LOL)


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

I would love to try this particular bean. Is there any chance of acquiring a few?
Thanks,
Janine


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Those are beautiful beans and blossoms. I have read that Scarlett Runner beans were poisonous till cooked. I hope that the toxic lectin phytohaemagglutinin in Phaseolus vulgaris does not form in the pod, too. I eat alot of raw pods in the garden.

Does anyone eat the roots of Phaseolus coccineus

Here is a link that might be useful: more about beans


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

happyday
Your seeds are in the mail as of today.Janine
PM me with your address.
Jim


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Jim, :) :) :) I was going to be like George and say that I had enough beans for now, no more new beans! but those purple beans are gorgeous. Thank you.

The first bean I ever planted was the Scarlet Runner bean. I planted them too early and they rotted, then I read that runner beans have a toxin, and I gave up on them, even though the scarlet runner bean is pretty enough enough to be worn as costume jewelry. Also they are huge.

Since then I have grown limas, which are toxic raw, and now I hear that even common beans, which I eat raw all the time are moderately toxic, so what the hell.

I have a new raised bed in a partially shaded spot where I can try the Insuk together with groundnuts. Zeedman, do you think that if I heavily mulched this bed next fall, the roots might survive a Wisconsin winter?


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Happy, it's not likely that the roots would survive our winters without extraordinary protective measures. I've read that the roots can be dug up & over-wintered, but have never tried it. From what I have heard from others, it is difficult to accomplish successfully... and given the length of our winters, they would probably not survive until Spring.

No worries, though... as you can tell from comments made in this thread, "Insuk's" grows very rapidly from seed.

As for toxicity... if the raw snaps are poisonous, I'm already doomed. ;-) I've eaten the immature pods often as a snack while gardening. They are a little rougher on the outside than P. vulgaris snaps, but are sweet & tender inside. I would not eat the developed seeds raw, however... which is good practice for most raw legume seed (peas & peanuts excepted).


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Happy

I live in England where our winters are zone 8 and as an experiment I mulched last year over my runnerbean roots. Unfortunately I lost the lot. In your zone 4b as Zeedman suggested, there is practically no chance that they would survive.

On the other hand, overwintering them is fairly straightforward and I do this every year. I have some sitting in the conservatory/sunroom now. I cut the stems about 6 inches above ground, then dig the roots with a generous amount of soil around the roots. I place them in a double plastic bag, but that is just convenience. They could be planted in a large container of some sort just the same. I keep them in a light, frost-free but quite cold place. I water very sparingly. Just to keep them marginally damp I tie the handles on the plastic bag which prevents drying out. I guess more watering is needed in a container or a large pot.

In spring they will resprout and can be replanted, once danger of frost has passed. I don't get 100 percent, but perhaps 8 out of 10 roots will resprout. Often more than one new shoot develops, making two plants out of one root.


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Galina, good to hear from someone with experience overwintering runner beans. I've got tons of questions. ;-)

- How do your over-wintered roots compare to plants grown from seed? Are they earlier, or higher yielding? I am just wondering if the advantages make the effort worthwhile.

- How long does it take to grow roots large enough to survive the lifting process? In other words, how many days do your plants grow between the time they are planted, and the time they are dug up?

- How many months do you keep the roots dormant? Here, the period from Autumn frost to last Spring frost is about 7 months! :-o I do not believe the lifted roots would survive so long a period of dormancy, although I am tempted to put that to the test.

It's pretty cold here now, hasn't been above -20 C. all day.


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Zeedman

To your point one. I started overwintering because I had not been very successful saving seeds one summer many years ago and wanted another opportunity. This is how I started, but I continued because it is a worthwhile exercise for us. Yes the plants are earlier, but that can be a mixed blessing. One year I had such big shoots growing out of my plastic bags that I had to trim them because it was too early to plant them out. Trimming is fine, because they will just send out side-shoots which carry on as leaders. If you get two stems and have good soil or feed the plants sufficiently then you get double the yield. I doubt they are higher yielding per se, but some years we get a late good flush of beans and if the main harvest was early, that second flush is more likely to happen before frost puts and end to the season.

Sowing to digging-up time. I sow in early to mid May indoors and plant out mid to late May. Our last frost date is late May/early June. I dig the roots up just before the first ground frost is forecast, usually during the first half of October. The fleshy roots are quite irregularly shaped and it is necessary to dig around them generously to get all of it.

I don't keep them dormant, they stay dormant until the temperatures and light levels rise again, usually in April. Suddenly the first new stems and a few leaves grow out of the plastic bags stretching towards the light. After planting out in May, I protect them with fleece/frostcloth until our weather is frost free. At this stage beans from seeds are only seedlings and although they grow fast, the overwintered ones will produce beans 3 weeks to a month earlier.

There might just be an extra benefit for gardeners in the USA. Most runnerbeans, with the exception of Insuk's Wang Kong, don't appreciate heat and need a lot of moisture. Overwintered ones are ready to produce earlier in the growing year, when the weather hasn't turned hot yet and when the ground is still quite moist.

There is quite a lot about overwintering runner beans on www if you 'google'. However mostly from UK sources. It was a much-employed technique by Victorian gardeners, but I don't know whether it was practised much outside of Britain.

I can't promise that it will work out for you and your growing conditions - our climates are very different. But there is no particular reason why it could not work either. If you try it, I'd be very interested to hear about the outcome.




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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Galina, thanks for the good info. Do you grow Scarlet Runners, or Insuk Wang Kong, or another kind of runner?

In my case everything indoors is heated, so storage options are only either room temp or frozen outside. I could keep them in a 5 gallon bucket in the basement. They would be room temp but in the dark. Would darkness keep them dormant? Do they need air movement to prevent rotting? If I left the lid ajar they would be more likely to pick up some light. Maybe I could put cardboard over the bucket. It would breathe a little bit.

Can someone tell me, should I plant the Insuk Wang Kong in full sun or partial shade? Should I give them a trellis to climb, if so, how far up will they go?


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More info

This site says to overwinter like dahlias, then describes rinsing dahlia roots clean. So I might try storing cleaned Insuk roots in the refrigerator, if they are not too big.

Another possibility is to build a big compost pile just before frost and stick them inside. I had a 4'x4'x10' winter compost pile a couple of years ago, loaded with leaves, grass and about a million holiday pumpkins, and it was hot all winter. Of course it might sprout too early or rot in there, too.


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Happy

I have only grown Insuk's once - this year for seedsm so not much experience yet. My favourites are Painted Lady, but I have grown many other varieties too. Lady Di, Sunset, Black Magic, Butler, Stenner, Virag etc. In Britain we grow a lot more runnerbeans for pods than gardeners in warmer areas who mostly grow them for the flowers and for the seeds.

As is the case with just about every gardening technique, there are as many ways of doing something as there are gardeners. And we need to make the best of the environment we have or can create. Scrubbing roots clean and storing in the fridge might well work as might storing them in an active compost pile. Both methods could be capable of preventing the drying out of the roots and the freezing of the roots. If you get one of these methods to work please tell us because there will be a lot of interest within this group.


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Jim, got the Insuks today. My god they are HUGE! Zeedman, they look even bigger than the Bird's Egg #3! You have grown both, which is bigger? Well, I'll find out this summer.

Also the Insuks are still very plump looking, although dry and hard. Like corn, some beans shrink and wrinkle when dry and some stay plump looking. Is this because the Insuks have more starch, or protein, than other beans, or a lower water or sugar content?

I look forward to trying them. My neighbor has a cattle panel he might let me use to make an arch. Will be great if it attracts hummingbirds too.

Going to be a great garden next year, hope all are well and able to enjoy it! :)


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Happy
If you really want to appreciate how large the beans actually are take a couple of them and soak them overnight as if you were going to cook them the next day. They will triple in size.Then you will know what Fliptx meant when she said you eat them with a fork.(not an exact quote)
Jim


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

...triple?? TRIPLE?

*insert moment of awed silence here*

I think I know what Fliptx meant when she said hernia. Fortunately I have lifted weights too, and know the secret. Lift with the knees, not the back. Use a karate kiai if you have to. Also I have a wheelbarrow and a fridge dolly, so as long as I stick to lifting only one bean at a time, I should be ok.

Looks like my search for the biggest bean is over. The color and name are appropriate. There used to be laws that only kings could wear purple.


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Received my beans today! They are beautiful! Can't wait for June to roll around so I can plant them :) Thank you so much Jim!

I live in central WI... pondering if I should start them indoors 2 weeks before putting them out. I never thought of starting beans indoors until reading this thread.

Last year was my first having runner beans. I planted scarlet runners along my garden fence. I didn't know if they were edible or not. I kind of assumed that they were only ornamental. After reading this thread I decided to cook what I had saved. They were really delicious! Mixed with a little brown rice, turmeric, cumin, cilantro and lemon juice.... MMMMMMMM!

Insuk's Wang Wong will only cross with other runner beans, correct? I have plans to grow quite a few legumes this year but Insuk is the only runner.


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

I had good luck starting bush beans indoors, but will never start pole beans that way again. Not unless they can be started well separate from each other in peat or paper pots with attached support to be planted with them. Pole seedlings will quickly twine themselves together and you won't be able to separate them.

Better to preheat the planting area with black plastic then direct seed under a belljar, wallowater, or under a soda or milk bottle if you want to start early. YMMV.


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Birdie, "Insuk's" will only cross with other runner beans. Where I am (close to Lake Winnebago) "Insuk's" will succeed if direct seeded, because of its heat tolerance. Other runner beans need an early start, so they will (hopefully) set a few pods before hot weather.

I've had good luck with pole bean transplants; I do it for varieties I am growing for seed, or for rare varieties I can't trust to our temperamental weather. Pole limas & yardlong beans, in particular, are very unreliable in our climate unless started early as transplants. Other than those, unless you are growing a bean for seed, there is generally no need for transplants.

Last year, however, I started nearly all of my pole beans as transplants - at the time I would have normally planted them directly. Because when it came time to plant, my garden was underwater!!! :-( Fortunately, nearly all did well when I finally got them in... in spite of the rabbits.

As soon as the beans germinate, they go into a solar greenhouse; they will quickly become leggy under lights, unless you use HPS or similar. They usually have 1-2 true leaves when I transplant them, and are just beginning to put out a runner. The best system I've found is to use peat pots (or strips), in a plastic flat with sand in the bottom. The roots grow into the wet sand, rather than die off as they would otherwise... just be careful to avoid over-watering. When transplanted, these extra roots pull easily from the sand, and if kept moist, minimize transplanting shock.

Now, let me get this straight... you found a good recipe for the dried runner beans??? I've got to hear more about this... would you consider posting your recipe here?


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Rainbow beans


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

I posted the recipe I use for runner beans. One of my favorite meals. I actually had it for breakfast this morning :)

I have a different recipe, using similar spices, that I use for beans that cook up to a thick soup.


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

I came across this variety recently, while searching for other things. I wonder if it is closely related to "Insuk's"? Note the reference to Summer pod set.

Here is a link that might be useful: Galaxy runner bean


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

zeedman - reading the bit about 'whatever the summer weather' as a Brit I think maybe I am getting a different message from you. To me that phrase means 'however wet, cold and gloomy the summer' rather than referring to too much heat! The same thing happens when I read the phrase 'hardening off' on these forums. It took me a long time to realise that many US were often acclimatising their plants to heat and sunshine. To a UK gardener 'hardening off' means accustoming a baby plant to wind, heavy rain and fluctuating low temperatures. ie the British summer. Regarding the possible relationship between Galaxy and IWK - it's possible, but to me Galaxy just likes like most other red flowered runner beans, any of which could fit the bill.


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Hmmm... hadn't thought about cool weather tolerance. You could be right, Flora. Perhaps a mistaken assumption on my part. To me, in my area, mid-Summer = heat.


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Just as an example - last August here had fewer hours of sunshine than either last March or last December. Summer 2008 was a wash out.


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

We had our wash out in the spring.


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Wow this bean sounds amazing! I've had my eye on getting a scarlet runner, but was worried about our LA summers. Insuk's Wang Kong sounds like it would get at least another month of podset. And those flowers!

Jim~ I don't suppose you'd be able to part with a few more?


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Hey Jim!
Super awesome thanks so much for sending me those beans. My goodness! They are HUGE! I'm afraid to picture the pods those things came in.

I planted 5 in my neighbor's greenhouse today, and will plant another 3-5 in ground tomorrow. I'm trying convince him to run it up with the jasmine on the side of his greenhouse, but at the very least he's planning on putting a pair on his fence. I've got at least one more friend interested, and another who will want me to pass them along as soon as the roofers stop killing everything in her yard.

I'm almost tempted to grow only purple or only black beans for a couple of seasons, but the genetic variation is probably a good thing so I don't think I'll try to fix what ain't broke.

Thank you so much!


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Cougi(becca)
You probably wouldn't accomplish anything separating them as this is the normal color variation for Runner Beans.I'm sure some of the Bean experts on this thread will comment on your planting idea. I do get an occasional white one which produces white flowers and have saved the seeds. I don't plant them anymore and have offered seeds but no interest. Only Roger in SC seems to have an interest in the white ones and I believe he may try to isolate them.


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

Here are the IWK beans and the rustic trellis I built for them. I am getting my first flowers. You might see that some of the leaves look really bad. I planted last october and they grew OK, but then completely stopped growth. They did not grow at all for about 3 months. They also seem to be afflicted with something (? not sure what?) and I really thought I was going to lose them. Ever since the spring equinox we got small fresh leaves that started to sprout/grow and they are looking much better. I even got my first flowers. I am really curious if anyone has observed this apparent sensitivity to day length? I suppose for me the best would be to plant on the winter solstice? or a bit after?

In case you are curious it is celery, parsley and cilantro interplanted with them.


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RE: Insuk's Wang Kong (Runner bean)

If anyone has some of the runner bean seeds to trade I have Some Scarlet Empire and Wisley Magic I can trade. PLMK.:)


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