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Grafting Lucky Bamboo

Posted by phay_cing (My Page) on
Wed, Oct 11, 06 at 9:23

I have been thinking about grafting lucky bamboo to some sort of outdoor bamboo. I have read that they do this with roses and trees to make them hardier. I am hoping that if it works I will be able to have a grove of lucky bamboo in my yard.
I have been reading alot about grafting this year and suceeded in grafting a tomato to a potato.
If anyone else has tried this I want to know how it worked for you. And if you have any suggestions that may ensure my sucess.


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Grafting Lucky Bamboo

  • Posted by lkz5ia z5 west iowa (My Page) on
    Wed, Oct 11, 06 at 15:28

In general you can't graft unrelated plants. Lucky bamboo will not graft onto one of your outside plants. Bamboo will graft to its own species and possibly genus. Such as example:
Phyllostachys nuda to nuda
or maybe
Phyllostachys aurea to nuda


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RE: Grafting Lucky Bamboo

To add to that just a bit, Lucky Bamboo is a common name of a plant that is not remotely related to real bamboo. Lucky bamboo is actually a type of Dracaena, commonly grown as a house plant. You might want to ask over in the Bamboo Forum.


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RE: Grafting Lucky Bamboo

I am quite sure from what I have read in R.J. Garners Grafters handbook that it should be possible to graft them even if they are not in the same genus or species. It says in the book that Quince can be grafted to pears as well as Privet can be grafted to Lilac. I guess I can't see why yall are so sceptical? And I swear I remember reading somewhere that someone grafted a sunflower to a pea but I will have to look up that reference. Anyhow I am determined to make this work out. BTW why would I ask the bamboo forum? I have asked them questions about lucky bamboo and I get the feeling that they don't help anyone with lucky bamboo they even mock people. I have seen this it's just unbelievable.


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RE: Grafting Lucky Bamboo

  • Posted by lkz5ia z5 west iowa (My Page) on
    Fri, Oct 13, 06 at 1:52

quince and pear are related.
lilac and privet are related.
Sometimes they can be in the same family and be grafted. But lucky bamboo chromosomes do not match up to the same number as bamboo species. In order to have specific entry of the wound, one would have to know which layer to mark. I think you would need a microscope for that. It sounds more like lab work your looking into. A home gardener will not be able to change the chromosome count. We're talking about investing thousands of dollars into this illogical grafting of non-relatives. I think for scientific purposes it could be interesting, but what else is there to gain?

And why would someone graft a sunflower to a pea? Were they trying to make peanuts?:)


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RE: Grafting Lucky Bamboo

You can also graft deadly nightshade to tomato. This is an especially fun project if you hate your neighbor who grows heirloom tomatoes from their own seed. As the two can easily interbreed and grafting makes certain that the deadly nightshade pollen will be close by to put a little special goodness in his next years crop.

LKZ, I hate to correct you, but you can change the chromosome count of a plant at home using colchicine. Watch out though cause the colchicine can kill you if you are not careful.


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RE: Grafting Lucky Bamboo

Faking-
Some persons just want to deliberately hurt others in every way they can. They especialy like to make mockery of others culture and heritage. This is a low form of cruelty to those who are sincere. Lucky Bamboo is a symbol to many and a hope. I like my Lucky Bamboo and no one is going to change that.


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RE: Grafting Lucky Bamboo

dirt_dew--Chill out, nobody is trying to mock culture heritage in this thread, I think, though maybe a post explaining more of the LB's cultural significance would be enlightening to the rest of us.

I'm wondering where the unusual hybrid phay_zing proposes, if it could be brought into existance, would live? Indoors and the bamboo would respond how? Outdoors and the Dracnea wouldn't be very happy, or do they do well outside in az? I think they'd get the chills in my neck of the woods...


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RE: Grafting Lucky Bamboo

You're new to the forum or you would know that several posters have been coming in here with absurd and unkind postings. Phay cing's (Faking) post falls into that catagory, seemingly. I'm totally with dew on this one.


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RE: Grafting Lucky Bamboo

Rhizo 1 why would I come to a forum to discuss lucky bamboo especially after being ridiculed at the bamboo forum for even asking questions about lucky bamboo? FYI just because you think something is "absurd" or "wrong" doesn't mean that it is invalid. I may eat pork which muslims and jewish people will not but that doesn't make me wrong does it? Most of the time I just like to do things that haven't been done its more of a challenge to do things differently. Very few people these days graft they just go to the big box stores and buy what they want. I personally enjoy working and propagating the plants. There is a lot of satisfaction and pride in saying "I grew that from seed or I grafted 5 varieties of apple to that tree." Or "I grafted a tomato to a potato and it worked" I hope to be doing tissue cultures some time soon just to try something new.
Give it a break, and try not to be so judgemental in the future.


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RE: Grafting Lucky Bamboo

Fake,

I hadn't seen any posts in the bamboo forum to support your allegations of being ridiculed over there. Nor in any forum. What user name had you adopted then? ;-)

Grafting can only work if the two plants in question are somewhat closely related, belonging within the same plant family but preferably having an even closer relationship.
I am quite sure that Garner's book would have discussed that.

Bamboo is a grass, belonging in the Graminae family. Dracaena sanderiana has been placed within its own unique family, Dracaenacae. No graft union would be possible.


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RE: Grafting Lucky Bamboo

  • Posted by lkz5ia z5 west iowa (My Page) on
    Wed, Oct 18, 06 at 12:44

Interesting to note that I already said what can and cannot be done in my previous posts regarding grafting. Take note phay_cing and rhizo_1

If anyone is making mockery of something its dirty_dew. Isn't interesting that dew insults phay_cing's name by calling the person 'Faking', yet; proceeds to say people are mocking the heritage behind lucky bamboo. Hmm, hypocrite.


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RE: Grafting Lucky Bamboo

I didn't realize that my screen name could be read as Faking I get it now. Actually my screen name is Thai. Phay (pronounced pie) is the Thai word for bamboo and cing (pronounced jing) is true or real. I just thought you guys were mocking and saying that I was faking.
Any how no offense taken.
As for the grafting book it did talk about compatability of course the closer plants are related the better your chances of sucess.
But I have found my source on the claim I made about the sunflower and the pea.
"Grafts, with vascular connections beween the scion and the rootstock, were sucessfully made using white sweet clover, Metilotus alba (Leguminosae) the scion, and sunflower, Helianthus annnuus (Compositae) as the rootstock. Cleft grafting was used....... The scion continued growth with normal vigor for more than five months."
Plant Propagation Principles and Practices 7th ed.
Hartmann & Kester
Vegetative Propagation
Chapter 11
Principles of Grafting and Budding
Page 437
Grafting Between Families

These two families probably have less in common than do Poaceae and Dracaenacae


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RE: Grafting Lucky Bamboo

"I hadn't seen any posts in the bamboo forum to support your allegations of being ridiculed over there. Nor in any forum. What user name had you adopted then? ;-)"

Perhaps some post nazi went whining about something said which was misinterpreted and it was deleted to keep the peace.

"Faking"? Really, Rhizo, dew- Before you go perverting foreign sounding names into unpleasant meanings in your own language, you really ought to consider how that might be construed as bigotry. Phay cing may not be offended, but I am.


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RE: Grafting Lucky Bamboo

Phay_cing-
I apologize for misspelling.
I had no intention of disrupting your thread. I merely expressed my empathy for those who might be mocked in the bamboo forum you referred to somewhere, and also those who have been mocked here and anywhere. I like my Lucky Bamboo. I will keep it. It is doing well growing in water.


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RE: Grafting Lucky Bamboo

I think I misread or read too much into some of the posts too, so I'm not blameless. Sorry.
If it's any consolation, the closest I got on my own for an english pronunciation of phay_cing was 'phasing', which refers to something transforming or being between states.


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RE: Grafting Lucky Bamboo

[IMG]http://i32.photobucket.com/albums/d2/Nateabbott/nateabb-R1-042-19A.jpg[/IMG]
[IMG]http://i32.photobucket.com/albums/d2/Nateabbott/nateabb-R1-040-18A.jpg[/IMG]
I will be atempting the lucky bamboo graft this spring.


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RE: Grafting Lucky Bamboo

Spring should be upon you. Please let me know how it goes. I'm currently living in Brazil where Bamboo and Lucky B. grow like crazy. Best of Luck.


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RE: Grafting Lucky Bamboo

i'm curious if you have any results to share with us (sucessful or not).

i just yesterday witnessed with my own eyes a ficus grafted onto a ginseng, and shaped as a bonsai. i was told it is 35 years old.

grafting anything, much less non-related plants, is probably beyond my gardening skills, but i'm still very interested in the possibilities.

for christmas my aunt gave me a lucky bamboo with fake orchids strategically placed so at first it looked like a graft. since then i've been trying to figure out if it might be possible to graft a flower onto the lucky bamboo. although again, i'm probably not skilled or experienced enough to do such a thing.


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