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Beni Maiko

Posted by chilliwin 7 (My Page) on
Fri, Apr 19, 13 at 17:01

My first Acer Palmatum Beni Maiko.

 photo IMG_1476M_zpsf1775eac.jpg

I do not have much knowledge of growing it.

Caelian


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Beni Maiko

Is that a seedling grown start or a graft?


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RE: Beni Maiko

I have bought it. The picture was taken on 8th April 2013 after repotted. It has grown very fast, inside the room without grow lights. The leaves color have been changed, I think it is normal.
 photo IMG_1566_zps789bac03.jpg

Caelian


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RE: Beni Maiko

Hi,

I have a tree that was named Beni maiko, but some Maple specialists call it a Shindeshojo; they are very similar. Feel lucky that you have a Beni maiko, as they are very rare according to my research. They are easy to grow and love to be pruned and shaped, however, like nearly all Japanese Maples, they do not like hot afternoon sun. A semi-sheltered place is best. Don't let them dry out, but do not let them get soggy. Either extreme makes them unhappy. Just like Goldi Locks, they like it just right, but not extreme!

The Spring and Fall color of the Beni maiko is fabulous; no need for a flower garden becasue the maples are so colorful...and you don't have to dead head!


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RE: Beni Maiko

'Beni Maiko' is not particularly rare....no more so than 'Shindeshojo'. There's a bit of debate as to which has the more intense spring color. Shindeshojo is arguably the brighter red but Beni Maiko holds its spring color longer and has a bit more of interesting coloration during the growing season as well.

I'm not sure all would agree with the statement that they "love to be pruned" :-) Unless training as a bonsai, pruning on most JM's is minimal except for the removal of dead wood or any conflicting branching and is really considered to be a bit of an art form.


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RE: Beni Maiko

Hi AcerTR and Gardengal48, I am completely new on this subject. Thank you for the advice and opinions.
Now it has a lot of small branches but thinking to prune it. The final pot of this plant will be 12 gallon container. Climatic condition here might kill the plant if I planted it in the ground outside, I think.

Thanks for sharing.
Caelian

This post was edited by chilliwin on Fri, May 10, 13 at 4:39


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RE: Beni Maiko

The plant is getting a lot of branches. So should I wire the branches like bonsai? I do not have any experiences so your tips will be very helpful to me.
Caelian


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RE: Beni Maiko

Here's a more mature 'Beni Maiko' I've had for a few years. It has gone from burgundy to flame red to amber over the past few weeks.


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RE: Beni Maiko

You got very nice looking plants.
I think your plant is in the container. If so, how many gallons container you use and how many times do you fertilize? Thank you for sharing.
Caelian


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RE: Beni Maiko

My JM was in about 3 gal container. Now it is in about 12 gal container. I removed some branches and now it has so many new leaves. It is store bought, I do not know it is graft or grow from seed.

Japanese Maple Acer P 10SP13A photo IMG_3606_zpse7ad4529.jpg

Caelian


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RE: Beni Maiko

  • Posted by botann z8 SEof Seattle (My Page) on
    Thu, Sep 12, 13 at 1:00

What effect were you going after when you pruned this tree?
It looks way different now than I would have thought.
Mike Tumeltot ;-)


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RE: Beni Maiko

Nothing negative effect I see. I think the new colorful leaves grow faster :-) before pruned it looked like stopped growing, I think JM likes pruning :-)

Caelian


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RE: Beni Maiko

Any plant responds to prune by producing new growth - that's just the way it works. Pruning stimulates growth.

FWIW, I would do minimal pruning on a plant that size. First, you do not want it to focus on leaf development but rather on root development. Second, I am of the school of thought that JM's should be pruned only to enhance natural growth habits - they do not need a heavy-handed approach at any time. And a tree that young has not had enough time to develop any significant growth characteristics.

And if it was grown from seed, it is NOT a Beni Maiko - named cultivars of Japanese maples are only propagated asexually, typically by grafting. If seed grown it is just a species JM.


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RE: Beni Maiko

Gardengal48, thank you for the tips.

I do not know much about JM. It is store bought, I have no idea it is grafting or grown from seed. It could be grafting as you explained.

Since I have grown it, what I have learned is it does not like strong wind and full sunlight.

Caelian


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RE: Beni Maiko

If grafted, you should see some evidence of it :-) With trees that small and young, the graft union is fairly evident - it is only as they mature and begin to put a number of years on them that the graft become more or less invisible.

Here is a link that might be useful: pic of JM graft union


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RE: Beni Maiko

Gardengal48, thank you for the link.

It could be "graft union".

Japanese Maple 18SP13A photo IMG_3632_zpse0848e8f.jpg

It looks like more "Chishio Improved" the picture from the link.

Japanese Maple 18SP13B photo IMG_3634_zps4e59d6ca.jpg

Caelian


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