Return to the Midwest Gardening Forum | Post a Follow-Up

 o
Southern Magnolia in Chicago???

Posted by meadowbrite Chicago, Zone 5 (My Page) on
Fri, May 6, 05 at 1:31

I just ordered Southern Magnolia 'Edith Bogue' (zone 5 according to waysidegardens.com) and will try to grow it in zone 5. I can't say enough how much I want this plant in my garden, at least for its large evergreen leaves. I planted one in zone 6/NJ and it has grown to a huge tree. When I was buying it, I was told it wouldn't survive. Well, I want to be proven wrong again. The closest to Chicago, I have seen Southern Magnolia in St. Louis. I have heard of someone growing succesfully that tree in the Chicago's western suburbs.

Other plants I miss are aucuba japonica and blue hollies. If you have success with those or other above-zone 5 plants in zone 5 (or colder) please let me know. Oh, just to add, I have been growing successfuly Pampass Grass 'Pumila', part of it dies every winter, but each year I get more and more flowers and the plants gets bigger every year.

Kris


Follow-Up Postings:

 o
RE: Southern Magnolia in Chicago???

  • Posted by doniki z5/6 NE Ohio (My Page) on
    Fri, May 6, 05 at 23:51

Hey- I've been growing Edith Bogue here in the Cleveland area for about 6-7 years now and it has become a 15-20ft tree. It's glossy evergreen leaves are reason enough to grow it, but the flowers are great in summer... It has been through about -10F here with some leaf burn, but that was in its youth... It has routinely sailed through consecutively below zero nights without any leaf damage at all... Last summer I planted two Bracken's Brown Beauty's... Almost all the leaves burned off of them but they do have new growth beginning to show along the stems... Defoliation is common this far north until the roots are well established... If you are in the city of Chicago itself (or suburb) you will benefit from the extra heat and should have no trouble at all... But, just incase plant "Edith Bogue" out of winter wind and winter sun (which are worst than extreme cold)
Also- Blue Hollies are tough as nails here. You should be able to grow them in Chicagoland too... Aucuba is very tender for me... It usually dies back unless protected, but it does resprout... I personally don't think its worth the effort, but hey give it a shot... I personally have never had any luck with Pampas grass "Pumila." It may be the clay or extreme winter moisture, or the lack of heat in summer, but it never blooms and routinely rots in winter... This year I'm trying my luck with Pampas "Icalma" which blooms earlier and is 'hopefully' zone 6 hardy. Good luck


 o
RE: Southern Magnolia in Chicago???

I live in the western suburbs of Chicago( Sugar Grove) and I have 2- Edith Bogue and 2- Brackens Brown Beauty that have now been through 4 winters for Ediths and 3rd winters for Brackens. The Ediths no longer winter burn after having rooted down well and the Brackens show only minor burn after this winter.I personally believe Brackens Brown Beauty is hardier than Edith Bogue as I have never had any stem die back on them and I have had on Edith Bogue the first couple of winters. The Brackens is now 7 foot tall and bloomed very heavily last year. The secret is to plant as large a plant as you can get and they have a better chance of surviving. If you can get them through the first 2-3 winterstill they root down well, you should have good success. I am a hard zone 5 and have pretty good luck with hollies. I personally think american holly does better than the blues as the blues are very slow growing in our climate. I have a 7 foot Old Heavy Berry American Holly and a 5 foot Jersey Prince for pollination. I also have a 3 foot Acuba Japonica that I wrap with a string of christmas lights and then surround with burlap approximately thanksgiving to March 1. Have not had ANY leaf burn or die back yet. Also have a Nellie Stevens Holly I bought at Walmart 4 years ago that barely grows-2 inches per year but has little foliage burn.The point is, many plants are hardier than given credit for. The important things are NO winter sun, WATER, WATER , WATER until the ground freezes. Most broad leaves don't wilt and by the time drought damage occurs, the leaves just drop. A little extra heat from christmas lights and flood lights helps alot on very cold nights.


 o
RE: Southern Magnolia in Chicago???

  • Posted by doniki z5/6 NE Ohio (My Page) on
    Tue, May 10, 05 at 12:18

ilexopaca-
Do you really think Bracken's is hardier??? I don't know?? I never had any tip die back on Edith, I did have some defoliation- during one winter (about 50%) but nothing ever since... On the other hand, I just planted two Bracken's (5ft) last summer and have had almost complete defoliation this winter along with a bit of tip dieback too... It's been awhile since the winter when Edith Bogue defoliated, so I don't recall how quickly the plant refoliates. I sure hope it does, because Bracken's is a much more attractive plant, in my opinion... I also have I. opaca "Miss Helen" (8-9ft) and "Satyr Hill" (4-5ft). Never a scratch on them... I've had good luck with 3 Nellie Stevens... They had some winter burn during the first year, but nothing since. But as mentioned, they are not fast growing, but are always loaded with berries... They're about 5-6ft after tall. Fosters holly also seems adaptable for me...


 o
RE: Southern Magnolia in Chicago???

Thanks for this informative email.

I didn't realize that there were so many varieties to Ilex. It's funny, when I lived in DC, I picked them by their leaf size and color, I didn't care what zone they survived. I can't take those things for granted living in Chicago and before buying anything like the broadleaf evergreens, I like to hear opinions of people like you.

I currently have Ilex Blue Girl, it grows well, it's in the open, windy area and has a lot of berries. I like the larger and more waxy leaves of the american hollies (that is what I meant by the blue hollies in my original post) I need to brush up on my names, LOL. I haven't seen either of you write about growing the variegated american holly, have you guys tried? Those are really nice.

I'm very incouraged about the southern magnolia. I am supposed to receive it this week and it'll probably be a small one so I will take extra care of it. Have your Edith Bogue bloomed yet? I read it bloomes after a few years. How does it compare (foliage, habit and leaves) to the Brackens Brown Beauty? I just received the other reply from "doniki" where the latter is a winner in the "looks", what do you you think?

I live in Des Plaines, it's more NW from you and a tad closer to the lake. We probably have the same winter weather and I don't get much of the lake's protection in stabilizing the temps in winter.

Thanks again for your email,
Kris


 o
RE: Southern Magnolia in Chicago???

I guess I am partial to Brackens Brown Beauty as it has flowered for me every year since planted. Last year it flowered heavily so I am hoping this year is the same. Edith Bogue so far has only produced two flowers in 5 years but the two I have, show almost no foliar damage after this winter so hoping it will bloom well. I agree, Brackens is much prettier than Edith as a plant. Has better color, brown back and fuller in habit although the leaves are smaller than Edith. I haven't tried any variegated American Holly yet but I do have a variegated mesearve holly "Honey Maid" which is very attractive and came through its second winter unscathed. I just returned from Nashville Tennessee with a load of plants to try. I picked up an Ilex crenata 'Beehive Japanese Holly, A very large Ilex cornuta "Dwarf Burford " chinese holly, Ilex cornuta rotunda, chinese holly, and some clerya japonica. Plants are much cheeper in Tennessee than around Chicago. $ 3.99 for a gallon size shrub, 14.99 for 5 gallon size Holly,go figure. Dwarf Burford Holly is one of my favorites but have had little luck with it. Always has major stem die back, so I am trying the larger the plant, the better chance it has, the one I picked up is 5 gallon size and about 3 foot tall. Don't understand why Nellie Stevens does well for me and it is a cross between Ilex cornuta and English Holly, neither of which has done well for me.


 o
RE: Southern Magnolia in Chicago???

  • Posted by doniki z5/6 NE Ohio (My Page) on
    Tue, May 10, 05 at 22:25

Edith Bogue is not the best bloomer for me... I get maybe 10-15 blossoms on a 12ft tree, but it is in some shade, so that may be the reason... I just enjoy the fact that it is evergreen and the leaves are attractive in the winter. I purchsed the two Bracken's because I heard they were "reliable" in zone 5b, and good bloomers (better than Edith). I didn't expect them to defoliate... oh well... I guess, I hope, they will recover soon... I've read that defoliation is common in the first winter after planting. I see more and more M. grandiflora's being sold in N.E. Ohio (zone 5/6)... Edith Bogue, DD Blanchard, Little Gem, Bracken's Brown Beauty... I wonder how they are doing???

I have three Honey Maid's that are probaby in the worst place possible for them.... Part shade in summer, full sun in winter... and they do remarkably well.. Hardly a leaf burn the last couple of years. I have never tried a variegated ilex opaca, though I have tried a variegated ilex aquifolium and it lasted about three years, and shrunk every year until it died to the ground... Beautiful plant, sad demise... I bought a Dwarf Burford holly last summer in South Carolina and it came through the winter with only minor leaf burn- and NO protection... so I guess I'm lucky... Osmanthus "Goshiki" has also done well for me, though it does get wrapped in December... As do some "Cold Hardy" camellias...


 o
RE: Southern Magnolia in Chicago???

There is someone in Urbana with a Southern Magnolia on the south side of his home. I was just there last week for a huge plant sale (some of the most incredible selections I've seen at a local sale) and his tree was definitely a topic of conversation. I'm not a good judge of size, but I'm guessing it was a good 20-25'.

Cheryl


 o
RE: Southern Magnolia in Chicago???

The closest southern mag I've seen was in Springfield, IL..and they sure are gorgeous. When I got my mag I though it too was the southern..I'm still not sure which it is..it doesn't have pink flowers like most here in the sw burbs, but white..
Someone mentioned Pampass Grass being a problem..My PG is about 7 yrs old, grows tall blades of grass..I leave flowers and leaves on during winter..(birds eat seed, I often spot a bird sitting on the dead flowers in winter) then come early spring old grass is pruned..I also have a Japanese Grass, 4-5 yrs old that's supposed to be hardy to z6/7..In back I've got leopard grass, long green blades w/yellow spots..I love them all..Toni


 o
RE: Southern Magnolia in Chicago???

Great replies.
I finally got my S. Magnolia a week ago. I expected a tree form, but they shipped pruned shrub, quite large for a mail order. I will plant it in a semi-shady area but it's protected from the winter sun and somewhat from the winds. I live by the lake and I get some viscious winds in winter (and throughout the season as most Chicago area does). I love its huge waxy leaves, wish me luck guys with it.

As for Pampass Grass, my 'Pumila' though I covered it as usual this winter, it seems to have only one blade that survived, it's growing but most of the clump (sizable by now) has died/rotted. I think it's not the cold as much as the wet environment that kills it. I planted it in dry area, neve water it and it still gets too much water in winter. Oh well. Either me moving to a warmer clime or the Pumila will have to just go :-)

Toni, where do you live in IL? Just wondered if you're far from Chicago for growing the Pampass Grass. I've seen it in southern IL growing quite well.

Thanks,
Kris


 o
RE: Southern Magnolia in Chicago???

  • Posted by doniki z5/6 NE Ohio (My Page) on
    Thu, Jul 28, 05 at 23:22

I wanted to bring update this thread and ask a question if possible. As I stated earlier I planted (2) 5ft BBB's last summer. They completely defoliated last winter with about 1ft of dieback. They refoliated by June, but little by little the leaves on various branches are continuing to wilt, and then the entire branch dies. I really like the BBB's but they are shrinking this summer not growing... I made the mistake of not giving them any winter protection last year- thinking they would be as hardy as Edith Bogue, which I've never had any problem with burning or dieback. Maybe I should scrap these two and start with two large ones and wrap them and wilt pruf them for the winter. These two really don't look healthy... The leaves are even small and no blooms... Any suggestions...


 o
RE: Southern Magnolia in Chicago???

I don't have any suggestions, I can just give my observations, which I don't thik will help, LOL.

Each time I'm in the south, I admire the southern magnolias. It seems they thrive in just any place or soil, from really dry and hot full-sun exposure to shaded and moist areas. In the city environment, in DC, I see those trees (can't recognize the varieties, but all have huge waxy leaves) grow in tiny gardens, mostly shade/dappled shade and they thrive like locust. I have seen them trimmed as topiaries, hedges, or just allowed to grow as they may. So my guess is that they're quite tolerant of different environment once well established.

I have planted Edith Bogue in the NW burbs of Chicago, it's in dappled shade, I water it (like everything in our dry summer this year) and it seems to grow extremely well, branching and growing new large healthy leaves. I thing the young plants like moist and humid area, just like any evergreen with large leaves so they don't lose much water through the foliage.

Of course my magnolia is too young too bloom, but just the nice waxy foliage is rewarding. I just hope it makes it through the winter. I may put some winter protection, but definetely I'll put the descicant (spel.) twice in winter.

Thanks for writing,
Kris


 o
RE: Southern Magnolia in Chicago???

I would like to try a Southern Magnolia here in Valparaiso. I'm growing Agapanthus here in Michigan and they come back every year. Had them for over 10 years. I have white and purple and now I'm looking for different varities. Confusing because I mention both places. I live in Valpo, but have a summer home in South Haven, Michigan.


 o
RE: Southern Magnolia in Chicago???

Kris, I live in Brookfield..sw of Chicago..I don't cut back in winter, but keep flower stems for birds..they eat the seed or something because I see many birds nibbling away..then in spring, I cut back, and new growth forms..The first yr I planted PG I added mulch in fall, but since let it go..Toni


 o
RE: Southern Magnolia in Chicago???

  • Posted by doniki z5/6 NE Ohio (My Page) on
    Tue, Aug 2, 05 at 14:30

I took the plunge, and moved the two BBB (or what was left of them) to a "rehab" spot in the garden, against my neighbor's house- he doesn't care what I do. I went ahead and bought two large 8ft. Edith Bogue's in their place. I thought I should stick with what grows the best here. I'm just really dissapointed because everything I read stated that BBB were as hardy as Edith Bogue. I noticed a nursery selling DD Blanchard's. They too have the great "fuzzy-brown" underside. Does anyone have experience with DD Blanchard? I've read about other "Cold-hardy" cultivars of magnolia grandiflora, such as "24 below" and "Poconos", but where does one find these???


 o
RE: Southern Magnolia in Chicago???

Kris, do you mind if I ask where your purchased your Southern Mag? Also, this is the one w/white flowers, right? Waxy feeling, and beautiful? LOL..LMK..thanks, Toni


 o
RE: Southern Magnolia in Chicago???

There are three southern Magnolias at Chicago Botanic Garden. In a location where they are protected from winter winds, they survive but sometimes lose their leaves. They also suffer from the non-acidic clay soils. Good luck!


 o
RE: Southern Magnolia in Chicago???

When we lived in Richmond, VA, I was told that the northern range for southern magnolia was Washington, D.C. There are lots of southern magnolias in Richmond; when I worked in the financial district downtown, I used to pass by them on the grounds of the state capitol, which I think was designed by Thomas Jefferson. What a picturesque site, was neo-classical architecture surrounded by southern magnolia and boxwood.

So, are you all really talking about the southern magnolia with the platter-sized creamy-white blossoms? The one with the astringent scent? I don't remember seeing any of those around Chicagoland, but I wouldn't mind seeing them again, LOL.


 o
RE: Southern Magnolia in Chicago???

  • Posted by doniki z5/6 NE Ohio (My Page) on
    Sat, Aug 6, 05 at 12:29

Oswegian-
Yep, we are talking about the Southern aristocrat, "Scarlett O'Hara" magnolia. If a hardy form is used, it is often successfully grown as far north as Zone 5 with some protection... There are some fairly large specimens in Charleston WV, Pittsburgh, Cincinnati- among other cities on the zone 5/6 border. Many of these plants have been through -20F and lower and represent the "Cold Hardy" varieties that are being sold today, such as "Edith Bogue," and "Bracken's Brown Beauty." They often do not attain the massive sized trees you'd see in the South, but they do prosper and bloom, provided they are given sufficient heat. It would be great to see more nurseries on the border of zones 5 and 6 try these hardier varieties. It would certainly help break of the monotony of plant materials used.


 o
RE: Southern Magnolia in Chicago???

I forgot about a neighbor who lives 5 blocks from me..She was an eldery woman, in her late 70's early 80's.."She passed away 3 yrs ago..
Once summer while walking my dog, I saw this tree in front of her house..it was about 15' tall. I asked what it was an she said a Southern Mag..The next spring I went back there and sure enough, it was a Souther Mag. Big, white, waxy fragrant flowers..After she passed away, new ppl moved in, and since the tree hasn't been the same..but the point is, it's not impossible growing them here in IL..Toni


 o
RE: Southern Magnolia in Chicago???

Yes we have southern magnolia's every where here in tennessee and they are really hardy I would give it a try we have some here all over nashville that are like 90 feet tall 200 years old so im sure they have been threw some pretty cold weather threw the civil war era and stuff but the thing is about tennessee or the south for that matter its not constantly freezing jan is the coldest month yes but it drops down into the single digits once in a while and thats about it it doesnt stay that way but im sure if you get a strong southern magnolia it can endure some extreme cold haha we actually have one in are back yard its a hassle cause they loose there leafs in the spring and fall so the rake is always set by the fence ready but its not to have a tree that is green year round cause winter can be a depressing time of year so Its a possibilty


 o
RE: Southern Magnolia in Chicago???

I have a small Southern Mag that I will be planting next spring. It should hopefully do well, but we will see...

Kyle


 o
RE: Southern Magnolia in Chicago???

I finally have a picture of my Southern Magnolia 'Edith Bogue'. Follow the link below.
Again, I'm trying it out in the Chicago burbs/zone 5.

If the link doesn't work, try this:
http://community.webshots.com/user/khanusiak

Here is a link that might be useful: Southern Magnolia Picture


 o
RE: Southern Magnolia in Chicago???

Very nice mag. Mine is somewhat similar to that size... But it's going in the ground in the spring...

ps- I love Chicago's Phoenix palm!

Kyle


 o
RE: Southern Magnolia in Chicago???

  • Posted by doniki z5/6 NE Ohio (My Page) on
    Sat, Dec 24, 05 at 22:34

After walking around the yard today- finally warmed up to the 40's- I was noticing that Bracken's and a newly planted Little Gem are totally winterburned after one night at 5F and a few between 7-10F.... Though we have had continuous temps below freezing... No damage on two newly planted Edith Bogues though.. completely green- as is the older one I have.... Just an observation... I was just wondering how everyone's Southern Magnolias were looking so far this winter...


 o
RE: Southern Magnolia in Chicago???

There is an Edith Bogue that has been growing for several years in the Plant Sciences Building courtyard on the Cornell University campus in Ithaca, New York. Last winter temps got down to about -20 two nights in a row and it survived unharmed. This is a protected spot, so I'm guessing it wasn't -20 in the courtyard, but it was certainly well below zero.

EB certainly seems hardy, although the form is a bit open and leggy. I prefer the look of BBB but have no experience with its hardiness. There is also Albizia julibrissin (Mimosa Tree) growing in that same courtyard, and have seen some Ilex opaca (don't know the cultivar) growing in somebody's yard in town. I think that microclimate is really the key to success.


 o
RE: Southern Magnolia in Chicago???

Just wondering how eveyones Southern Mags are doing. It's been awhile since the last post and I was wondering how eveyones mags came back after last winter, especially those up here in IL IN and OH. I live on the IA/IL border and have two Southern Magnolias from last year and one Brackens that I bought over the summer. The two Southern Magnolias completely defoiliated after last years lows of -10 but came back and grew much larger over the summer. So far this winter, no damage to any of them.


 o
RE: Southern Magnolia in Chicago???

Hello, I'm Meadowbrite, but forgot my password so I created a new username, now under "Ferrous"

So, my Southern Magnolia is still surviving, even though we had some cold days here in NW Chicago, dipping down to -10F. The plant is covered with snow, frozen, I will see once it thaws if it makes it alright. My hunch is it may lose a few leaves but it'll be fine.

How is everyone doing?

IowaPalmz5, is that palm in your picture overwintered outside? It looks very nice and it's huge, it must be a chore to bring it indoors.

Kris


 o
RE: Southern Magnolia in Chicago???

Kris,
Actually that palm stays in the ground I wrpa it with insulation and small x-mas lights. Second winter in the ground. Just checked it yesterday and its still green underneath the wrap.

Jay


 o
RE: Southern Magnolia in Chicago???

Hey Jay this is mike. Ill be coming out that way in a week or 2. Hope to see your palms then. I might bring one back. Also my Brakens brown beauty seems bullet proof for here in the city. Also I tried regular Southern magnolia and it lost some lower leaves.


 o
Mike

I'll be around so give me a call when you're in town

Jay


 o
RE: Southern Magnolia in Chicago???

That is awesome... so you keep the lights on all winter? We had some harsh cold temperatures where I live and even my Southern Magnolia got windburnt. I looks fine otherwise, can't imagine wintering the palm here outside.

The palm surely looks impressive,
Kris


 o
RE: Southern Magnolia in Chicago???

Hello Midwest Gardeners -

I have a Southern Magnolia cultivar that was sent as a mistake due to an order for Magnolia macrophylla. The nursery that sent it was Appalachian Gardens before they went wholesale around 10 years ago. Any one ever order from them?
I grew the tree in a pot for a couple of years, then I learned about hardy cultivars so I planted it outside. I figured why not (plant it outside) as the nursery is located in Waynesboro, PA near the Poconos. There is a hardy Southern Magnolia cultivar called Poconos.
My tree has long, leaves with light green tomentum on the undersides. I have since contacted Appalachian Nursery, to no response to what cultivar it may be...
I packed it with leaves for the first two winters in the ground, this year I left it on it s own -
It is completely covered with snow ever since the temps dropped, the tree itself is about 4 feet tall. I am wondering if it is Edith Bogue as the leaves are long, sort of a rectangular shape, with no blossoms since I had it.
I also have on order from Forest Farm Nursery - 1 Edith Bogue and 1 Bracken s Brown Beauty Southern Magnolia.
I had a Bracken s Brown Beauty Southern Magnolia from Carroll Gardens. It grew good for two years, then the bottom graft died and the tree slowly declined and died. This tree did bloom - only had 2/3 blossums. I did not know it was grafted until I noticed the top portion (2/3 inches from ground) was larger when it was beyond help. I protected this tree well during the winter.

Thank you
Gerry
Hamburg, NY - near Buffalo


 o
RE: Southern Magnolia in Chicago???

My 'Edith Bogue' seems took some beating this dry cold winter, half of the leaves got brown, lower branches are still fully green (protected by the upper branches), but the plant looks very healthy otherwise. The flowerbuds and leaf buds are nice, plump and green, I am sure it will regrow the leaves. I didn't protect it at all this winter.
K.


 o
RE: Southern Magnolia in Chicago???

Hi Kris, you remind me of myself always wanting to plant things that are from a warmer zone! I live in Lex, KY and the southern magnolias thrive here (as well as hollies). I am also growing pampas "pumila". I cut mine back last weekend and hope I did not do it too soon! Since you are going to be the "southerner" on the block...throw a crape myrtle in the yard as well. Good luck and have fun!!
Chas


 o
RE: Doniki' s question answered and my tree info.

I am going to answer Doniki' s question as I was looking for the same M. grandiflora cultivars...

Doniki's question:
"I've read about other "Cold-hardy" cultivars of magnolia grandiflora, such as "24 below" and "Poconos", but where does one find these???"
I found Pocano at Rarefind Nursery and purchased one. I emailed Beaver Creek Nursery in Tennessee and they have two '24 Below' I find the S/H 12.00 plus 5.00 packing fees a pain, plus I read that Edith Bogue and 24 Below are pretty much the same so I am reconsidering finalizing that order.

I posted earlier regarding a Southern Magnolia sent as an order mistake from Appalachian Gardens. I have heard from them and they told me they do not carry Edith Bogue or Pocano. My tree is a seedling from mature trees in the Waynesboro area of PA. That tree is looking good as of now with only snow protection this year (my experiment for hardiness) My tree had a lot of fall and winter rain up to mid January when winter actually came to Buffalo, NY.
I have also ordered and recieved Edith Bogue and Bracken Brown Beauty from Forest Farm. They are healthy looking trees that are cutting grown - important IMO!
Gerry
Hamburg, NY zone 6 - 1 mile from Lake Erie


 o
RE: Southern Magnolia in Chicago???

Hello.. this is Kris/meadowbrite:

So, my Edith Bogue seems it survived the winter; it took some beating from freezing temeratures this winter (dipping down to -10 a couple of times) and constant dry winds and sun. Most leaves are winter burnt, copper in color, but those on lower branches and on the northern side of the plant are healthy and green. All buds are healthy, swelling, some even seem to be flower buds. I did not use any protection for this plant.

Last year I also propagated a twig from that magnolia, it rooted well (I'm a huge fan of propagating-I propagate most everything). I planted it near the "moma plant" and covered it with the styrofoam cone. It's all green and healthy looking.

A note on other stuff: my Enless Summer did not sustain any frost damage, all buds, including the flower and top buds are healthy, same thing with one of my blue lace hydrangea. I guess the winter was good after all. I'm still waiting if the banana banjsoo survived, I dug it up from under a 6 inch layer of mulch and at first sight it appears like some of the young shoots are firm and green. I am keeping my fingers crossed for that.

I'll try post some new pictures of the Southern Magnolia.

Kris


 o
RE: Southern Magnolia in Chicago???

Kris, We had an major ice storm and the top of my Edith Bogue snapped off.
Do you think it would be possible to root any cuttings from branches that broke off?
How did you do it?

Here is a link that might be useful: Ice Damage/Broken Edith Bogue Magnolia


 o
RE: Southern Magnolia in Chicago???

I hope someone has an answer. I've had an Edith Bogue for 3 years and it has always had beautiful leaves and good growth. We planted it in a large whiskey barrel with plans on transplanting it this spring. We have brought it inside each winter into a sunroom with lots of sunlight and it has always thrived.Now suddenly the leaves began to dry out but the bark is normal green. When we noticed the wilting drying leaves that began at the bottom and worked up we watered heavily, thinking the soil had become too dry or worse that roots were bound. The leaves show no sign of disease and are just dry and brittle. I'm afraid we waited too long to transplant. Can anyone tell me what's going on and what to do?


 o
RE: Southern Magnolia in Chicago???

Hello All

I'm curious to plant a southern magnolia at my house in the suburbs of Chicago. I'm just curious how everyone's magnolias have held up after the past three winters that have been both colder and snowier than normal? Did anyone have them die, or just suffer some dieback? When planting, is the east side for the house best to get some sun, but avoid the winter sun burn?

Thanks

Jeff


 o
RE: Southern Magnolia in Chicago???

Hello All
I'm curious to plant a southern magnolia at my house in the suburbs of Chicago. I'm just curious how everyone's magnolias have held up after the past three winters that have been both colder and snowier than normal? Did anyone have them die, or just suffer some dieback? When planting, is the east side for the house best to get some sun, but avoid the winter sun burn?

Thanks

Jeff


 o
RE: Southern Magnolia in Chicago???

UPDATE TO THE SOUTHERN MAGNOLIA IN CHICAGO

So 5 years later, last winter was unusually mild and my Southern Magnolia is doing very well. The tree is probably now about 8 feet tall, last winter did not loses any leaves, stayed evergreen all winter long. Now it's growing lots of new leaves. I hope it will bloom for the first time.

I am currently away, but when I return to Chicago, I will post some photos for you.

I want to see if anyone else is groing Southern Magnolia in Zone 5.


 o
RE: Southern Magnolia in Chicago???

My parents and I saw these magnificent trees last week while we were vacationing in Maryland and Virginia. They wanted to grow these back home in Pittsburgh, PA, but I thought they were too tropical to be grown here up north. Then I come across an article mentioning a rather stately one growing in East Liberty near Pittsburgh, and then I come across this thread about them even growing in Chicago. I am thinking they might be worth a try here now. If my parents can grow a Southern Magnolia, their yard will be the talk of the town!


 o
RE: Southern Magnolia in Chicago???

I started this post as meadowbrite, but not sure of the login.

Here I wanted to show a photo of my Southern Magnolia 'Edith Bogue'

It's been growing 5 years in the NW burbs of Chicago. Last winter was mild so it didn't lose any leaves, all stayed green through the winter. I did not protect it with anything.

Here is a link that might be useful: Taken August 2010


 o
RE: Southern Magnolia in Chicago???

Any update on the Chicago Magnolia meadowbright? I planted an 'Edith Bogue' in my yard in April. I live just north of Milwaukee, WI. So far this year it has grown a lot of new leaves and I am excited to see how it does this winter.

Photobucket

Photobucket


 o
RE: Southern Magnolia in Chicago???

Hi wxman, I added a lot of photos of the Edith Bogue on a Facebook page I created: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Chicago-Gardens/131171213391

I wanted to send just the album, but I am not sure how.

Yes, they magnolia is doing well... still has not bloomed, but it's getting quite large and no major freeze loss over the winter. I stopped covering the tree as it's pretty large now. I covered it first two winters only.

Your tree looks great.

Here is a link that might be useful: Chicago Gardens Group


 o
RE: Southern Magnolia in Chicago???

I live in zone 4, just west of Hartford, Wi. When our daughter died, a family member gave us a magnolia with its only identity being Grandiflora. Having no good place to grow it indoors, I planted it outside with a plan in mind.

We have a 3 foot wide by 5 foot high plastic culvert that I place over the tree. I then pack it full of fallen leaves. I remove the the assemblage in spring, the tree leafs out and blooms in mid summer. Well, it has worked so far but this year I will have to wrap it in burlap to shrink it, fit the culvert over it and then pile in the leaves with the addition of a large trash bag over the top which is now higher than the culvert.

So, does anyone think this magnolia would survive (let's say the winter of 2012) without the protection? We just do not want to lose this tree.


 o
RE: Southern Magnolia in Chicago???

Very interesting thread. Strangely I went to a poultry breeder in central Iowa to buy some birds and the man had 4 of these growing at his place. In his location you are in zone 4 maybe pushing 5. It was mid winter in January and I noticed some beautiful kind of evergreen trees he had growing and he said they were southern magnolias. He got the trees as seedlings from a friend in Georgia who sent him six seedlings in the mail from his trees and what I saw was the surviving 4. He said he went down there to visit when these magnolias were in bloom and was fascinated by their beauty. The trees I saw were nice sized trees when I went there, at least 12ft tall about 3 years ago. I wish I still had the guy's number but he since then had his number changed and got out of poultry. The crazy thing I realized after reading this thread is that he planted no special cold hardy cultivar and the parentage of these seedlings was from the south. I'm curious now if cultivar types truly matter? Has anyone else pushed the limits on any plain old none cultivar specific southern magnolias in Zone 5 or below?


 o
RE: Southern Magnolia in Chicago???

I'm in Springfield Illinois. I have Edith Bogue and Brackens Brown Beauty. I have also seen specimens of Little Gem and D D Blanchard. I haven't checked to see if D D Blanchard has survived but I know the other 3 have. As far as whether specific variety is important I don't know.


 o Post a Follow-Up

Please Note: Only registered members are able to post messages to this forum.

    If you are a member, please log in.

    If you aren't yet a member, join now!


Return to the Midwest Gardening Forum

Information about Posting

  • You must be logged in to post a message. Once you are logged in, a posting window will appear at the bottom of the messages. If you are not a member, please register for an account.
  • Please review our Rules of Play before posting.
  • Posting is a two-step process. Once you have composed your message, you will be taken to the preview page. You will then have a chance to review your post, make changes and upload photos.
  • After posting your message, you may need to refresh the forum page in order to see it.
  • Before posting copyrighted material, please read about Copyright and Fair Use.
  • We have a strict no-advertising policy!
  • If you would like to practice posting or uploading photos, please visit our Test forum.
  • If you need assistance, please Contact Us and we will be happy to help.


Learn more about in-text links on this page here