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Wanted: vigorous and sweet-smelling native creeper

Posted by greentreetea 5 (My Page) on
Wed, Jun 20, 12 at 13:35

Hi,

I am looking for a vigorous and sweet-smelling native creeper to plant next to our deck to cover it eventually. Flower size, shape and color don't really matter too much - quick growth and sweet blooms are my primary concerns.

What are my options (if any) or would I be better off going for a non-native plant in this regard?

Thanks!


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Wanted: vigorous and sweet-smelling native creeper

The commercial Honeysuckle vines come to mind. They seem to use native stock, are vigorous, and have spectacular blooms.


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RE: Wanted: vigorous and sweet-smelling native creeper

The sempervirens cultivars that I've run into (including the one I have)have no scent, though. They're great, covered with flowers for months, but no sweet honeysuckle smell - you only get that with the thuggish Japanese honeysuckle. I used to have dioica (sp?), and that had a slight smell, but no repeat bloom. Canandensis is shrubby and has no or little scent. Anyone grow the others?


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RE: Wanted: vigorous and sweet-smelling native creeper

Thanks for the replies. I will do some checking around the nurseries in my area.

As a complete aside: will Jasmine grow in my area?


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RE: Wanted: vigorous and sweet-smelling native creeper

Did you say what area you are in?

Are you asking about true jasmine or carolina jasmine et al?

Carolina Jasmine is not a true jasmine (is a Gelsemium instead) and the flower nectar is toxic to bees, not recommended as our bees are already in trouble!

Autumn clematis is one of my favorites (C. paniculata is a nice sweet smelling non toxic viney plant with lovely white flowers late summer-fall in most areas of the country)


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RE: Wanted: vigorous and sweet-smelling native creeper

Clematis terniflora (Sweet autumn clematis) is a non-native. It is also invasive in many areas, including my own.


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RE: Wanted: vigorous and sweet-smelling native creeper

Carolina Jasmine is not a true jasmine (is a Gelsemium instead) and the flower nectar is toxic to bees

I believe the correct description is toxic to HONEY bees which are non-native bees. It is not toxic to native bees who evolved with it.

And even the honey bees are only affected in mostly small amounts unless they happen to take it back to the hive.


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RE: Wanted: vigorous and sweet-smelling native creeper

Commercial honeybees are hybrids, usually based on Italian strains ie, not native.

Most nectar is carried back to the hive.


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RE: Wanted: vigorous and sweet-smelling native creeper

How about phlox divaricata? It smells great, (esp. 'Blue Moon') and spreads reasonably quickly.


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