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Monkey Pod tree in MA + Indian Paintbrush

Posted by vandy27 (My Page) on
Sat, Aug 13, 11 at 15:19

So I have a monkey pod tree growing in my backyard. We found it at a random store and it had no nametag but it was in the shrub section. We researched it and we are positive that its a Monkey Pod. How is this growing in MA? How should I get it to go up a little more before letting it grow out?

Second thing is I have some Wyoming Paintbrush, do I need to germinate the seeds or can I just bury them?

Thanks for any help!


Follow-Up Postings:

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RE: Monkey Pod tree in MA + Indian Paintbrush

If by monkey pod tree you mean Albizia saman, that shouldn't be possible. It is not tolerant of frost, let alone a MA winter. Perhaps you are confusing it with Honey Locust or Kentucky Coffee Tree?

Paintbrushes (Castilleja spp.) are semi-parasitic plants that typically require a host plant. For the eastern native species it is recommended that the seeds be sown in a shallow cut at the base of a suitable grass or sedge host. If the host is transplanted at the same time the cut may not be needed since some root damage will occur and that can provide a point of entry for the seedling.


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RE: Monkey Pod tree in MA + Indian Paintbrush

See that's why I'm so confused, its neither of those other trees and the flowers it gets are exactly like the ones in this webpage,

http://bnsullivanphoto.com/2008_06_01_archive.html

So it has to be something in that family. there is another one recently planted down the street. Ours in an odd location and it gets much wider than tall, so we cut back a lot of branches so it grows up. I also think its newer in stores because we found this at some local place and there were no others and I've never seen it at any other store since then. They sold it as a shrub but its definitely a tree. Is there a way to upload pictures? I have some if that would help.

And im a really amateur gardener and I'm not sure what a host plant is, if you could explain more how to do it, that would be great!


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RE: Monkey Pod tree in MA + Indian Paintbrush

If you set up an account on a photo sharing service like photobucket you can upload pictures and then copy the html code it gives you to a message here.

Regarding host plants, Castilleja gets part of its nutrition from another plant (the host). Typically it is a grass or a sedge. This aspect makes them more difficult to grow than many other plants. I do not know what plants would be suitable for use as a host for that species of Castilleja. You can try sowing the seeds with some grass seed and see if that works.


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RE: Monkey Pod tree in MA + Indian Paintbrush

vandy27, I looked at your pic, the plant in Hawaii known as Monkey Pod Tree is Samanea saman, it will not grow in New England.
The flower is very similar to Silk Tree, Albizia julibrissin which is an Asian native and very common in Eastern US. Where I am, mid-Atlantic, it is kind of weedy. You have Silk Tree AKA Mimosa

Sam


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